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Who Needs The King Anyway

Posted by Matthew Anderson on February 20, 2010 at 11:10 PM

Game Of The Week

 

This weekend I played in the Colorado Springs Open. I was hoping to get a good game from the tournament to publish this week, but I was not really fond of any of my games. I asked Randy Canney for one of his, but I just received a couple from him today and won’t have time to Fritz them until next week. So, you have that to look forward to.


Anyway, as I was putting my weekend’s games into my Fritz database, I was struck by the fact that my win against Renae Delaware went 43 moves without a check from me. I thought that was unusual. I wondered how often I had won games that lasted past 40 moves without ever checking the opponent’s king.


At first, I noticed I had a handful under 20 moves, but that seemed to make sense; If you play enough games someone is bound to blunder big time in the opening and resign without any checks. But the longer the game goes the less and less likely it seems the game could last without eventually running into the king.


So I counted. As white, I found 9 games, and as black, I found 4 (out of 362 total games). That is about 4%. I did find one against Frank Shotwell that lasted 40 moves without any checks and ended in mate, but I decided not to count any contact with the king. I also found one of the white ones that lasted 40 moves against Andy Hortillosa (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/2929730-biggest-upset) where neither side checked.


But my record is 63 moves in a win without any checks by the victor. See if you can beat that (I have gone 66 moves without a check but the game continued with a check later). Honestly, I think my percentage is higher than most players would find. I tend to find myself often forgetting about the king and just trying to find a way to promote a pawn.


Such was the case against Renae. I was hearing so much about her exploits in beating Lube Master Brian Wall over email that her legend was growing larger and larger in my mind. Then, in front of the entire chess club, I have my meager natural chess ability demonstrated on the same night Renae draws the Wall/Bloomer combo as I go down in a flaming wreck.


So, I thought there was no way I could last against her tactically. I decided I would play ultra safe and look to win in a long, drawn-out endgame. After playing twelve book moves, her aggressive nature took over, and she sacrificed a knight. With the material advantage in hand, I figured I could slowly grind things down to a won endgame without even a first thought about getting to her king.

 

Who Needs The King Anyway

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=92918


[Event "Colorado Springs Open"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2006.03.05"]

[Round "5.6"]

[White "Delaware, Renae"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B18"]

[WhiteElo "1446"]

[BlackElo "1793"]

[PlyCount "86"]

[EventDate "2006.03.04"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Nf3 Nf6 7. h4 h6 8. h5

Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 e6 11. Ne5 Bd6 12. Bf4 Qc7 13. Nxf7 Kxf7 14. Qg6+ Kg8

15. Bxd6 Qxd6 16. O-O-O Nbd7 17. Kb1 Rd8 18. Rhe1 Nf8 19. Ne4 Qf4 20. Nxf6+

Qxf6 21. Qe4 Rd5 22. g4 g5 23. Rf1 Qf4 24. f3 Rh7 25. c4 Rd8 26. Rd3 Rhd7 27.

Rfd1 Qxe4 28. fxe4 Rf7 29. d5 exd5 30. exd5 cxd5 31. cxd5 Rfd7 32. Kc2 Rd6 33.

Kc3 Nd7 34. Re1 Nf6 35. Red1 Nxg4 36. Re1 Nf6 37. Re5 Rxd5 38. Rdxd5 Rxd5 39.

Re6 Kf7 40. Re3 Nxh5 41. Kc4 Rd7 42. Kc5 Nf4 43. Rb3 h5 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

Tuesday March 7, 2006

 

On February 28, the CSCC had 25 members in attendance. Before the start of the simultaneous exhibition, Brian Wall organized a demonstration involving four chess players from different rating levels. The group included Tom Mullikin representing the 1200 crowd, Bob Weber representing the 1500 crowd, Paul Anderson representing the 1800 crowd, and Josh Bloomer representing the 2100 crowd.


The object of the demonstration was to illustrate natural chess ability by completing a knight’s tour of a chessboard in less than 10 minutes. The knight starts at a1 and has to move to the next adjacent square using any number of legal knight moves while avoiding the squares that four pawn are resting on (c3, f3, c6, f6) and attacking (b2, d2, e2, g2, b5, d5, e5, g5).


Once the knight makes it to the next square, it continues the process until it has landed on each square of the row where it moves up to the next row and back across each row (skipping those squares mentioned) until it arrives at a8.


Of course, Josh finished first within three minutes, but Bob finished in four minutes right behind him illustrating how much untapped natural ability Bob has in reserve.


The only remaining question was whether the 1800 could finish before the 1200 with 8 minutes already off the clock. Well, I am happy to report that I did not disappoint my peers. I clobbered the 1200 by four seconds clearly demonstrating that my natural ability is slightly above the 1200 level.


After the demonstration, seventeen members played in the simultaneous exhibition given by Brian Wall and Josh Bloomer. They alternated moves, without consultation, and allowed players to choose their color and have two passes. Here are the order of finish and results:

 

Player

Moves

Result

 

Jenna Bloomer

16

0.5

 

Jerry Maier

17

0.0

 

Chris McCarty

17

0.0

 

Bob Weber

27

0.0

 

Virgil McGuire

30

0.0

 

Bill Whinemiller

31

0.0

 

Scott Hontz

32

0.0

 

Danny Diekman

32

0.0

 

Michael Voight

33

0.0

 

Renae Delaware

37

0.5

 

Tom Mullikin

37

0.0

 

Dan St. John

40

0.5

 

Paul Anderson

47

0.0

 

Michael Filppu

49

0.0

 

Joe Pahk

50

0.0

 

Cindy Langseth

58

0.0

 

Dwayne Langseth

59

0.0

 

Colorado Springs Open Prizes

By Buck Buchanan

 

Player

Score

Place

$

 

Josh Bloomer

5.0

1st

175

 

Randy Canney

4.5

2nd

125

 

Arthur Glassman

3.5

U2000

25

 

Shaun MacMillan

3.5

U2000

25

 

Paul Anderson

3.5

U2000

25

 

Larry Wutt

3.5

U2000

25

 

Joe Fromme

3.5

U1800

85

 

Nathan Stark

3.0

U1500

70

 

Michael Filppu

2.5

U1300

60

 

Daniel Gonzales

2.0

U1100/UNR

25

 

Kyle Leeds-Tilley

2.0

U1100/UNR

25

 

About Buchanan-Bloomer Game

By Martin Deschner

 

I was just looking at this drawn game. Looks like3....g5 might have been worth a shot. Then, if 4.Bg3Nxg3. Later, you could back up the g5 pawn with theh6 move. Worth a thought...Martin Deschner in Denver

 

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/2929521-help-i-ve-fallen-and-got-silver

 

Upcoming Events

 

3/7 Speed Tournament, CSCC

3/11 DCC March Quick, DCC

3/14 King’s Gambit Thematic - 2-game matches, G/30, opening 1 e4 e5 2 f4, exf4, CSCC

3/25-4/2 Colorado Chess Festival, CSCA

4/8 DCC Daylight Savings Special, DCC

4/29-30 Utah Quick Chess, Bughouse and Random Chess Championships, CSCA

 

Colorado Springs Chess Club: CSCC

Denver Chess Club: DCC

Colorado State Chess Association: CSCA

Categories: 2006

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