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Timothy's 1st Epistle To Paul

Posted by Matthew Anderson on February 20, 2010 at 10:20 PM

Game Of The Week

By Timothy Brennan

 

Hey Paul,

 

I am honored that it is Tim Brennan week again (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/2929363-tiny-tim)! That is really cool!

 

I'm a big fan of your newsletter, as you know. Here are some brain ramblings:

 

One thing I like is how obsessed you are about statistics. I love when you write stuff like "I have a record of 7 wins, 3 loses, 1 draw by repetition, 1 forfeit win, 1 loss on time, and 1 stalemate in games against players who are rated between 1324 and 1591, who don't play 1. g4, on even numbered days of the month, in years where Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow."

 

It is interesting to me because I think people try to find "meaning" in the things that they do. Or if they don't try to find meaning, they will at least backwards rationalize *why* they do something. Lately, some of my thoughts have been along the lines of "Why have I spent so much time on chess the last couple of years? What am I getting out of this?"

 

There have been a lot of other things I could have been doing - learning a new skill, making money, go bowling with Barrack Obama, etc.

 

One book I read recently is called "The Power of Now" by Eckhart Tolle. Apparently, Madonna said this was her favorite book, for those of you that are fans of "Madge". In this book, Tolle talks about how so few of us are really living in the "Now". We are stuck on the past, or worrying about the future. But really all that we ever have is "NOW". It is never not "now".

 

I think that one thing I really like about chess is it forces you to be in the now. It allows you to mentally do something that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi calls "Flow" in his book "Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience". It basically is an activity that can allow you to take a timeout from the crazy world we now live in with crackberrys, ipods, cellphones, email, internet and 100+ different tv channels. Man didn't really evolve in such a crazy and insane type of environment with constant stimulation and distraction. I think this is part of the reason that activities like yoga are becoming more popular.

 

So that is why I play - I enjoy the "flow" and "now" that chess provides and the timeout from all the craziness of the world we now inhabit.

 

Now for a game:

 

I thought it was interesting in the last Colorado Chess Informant how Randy Reynolds said that he thought the "heart" had moved from Denver to Colorado Springs the last couple of years. It is probably just a coincidence that Anthea Carson and I both moved to Colorado Springs from Denver in the last couple of years.

 

When I lived in Denver, my big "rival" was Paul Grimm (and also one of my best friends). Now that I live in Colorado Springs, Anthea has become my big "rival", and also a best friend. I know you are big on "rivalries", so I am trying to speak your language. ;-)

 

My games with Anthea are all over the map. One game she will destroy me with something absurd like "The Crab" and laugh. The next game I will come back from behind a piece, and she won't talk to me for two weeks. One game I win in 5 moves (1.f3 e5 2.Kf2 Bc5+ 3.e3 d5 4.c4 dxc4 5.Bxc4 Qh4+ 0–1). The next game, she will crush me without having to think (like at the Denker Fundraiser).

 

Anthea and I both play odd openings (she literally wrote a book about them), and we both play different openings in every game (which is very rare for some reason - I think more people should do this - everything you want is outside your comfort zone). I never know what she will do, and she never knows what I will do. She is better than me at most aspects of the game, but I think I have better tactics. She sometimes gets distracted or emotional, which helps me as well. But we are evenly matched.

 

This game was very satisfying to me. She was on a "crab" kick. She completely violated me in the opening - and was up a PIECE. I went into Rambo mode - "NOTHING IS OVER!! NOTHING" and fought back with some "De la Maz's", as I like to call them after Michael De La Maza, who wrote the brilliant (MUST READ) "How to gain 400 points in 400 days" articles that changed my life (http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skittles148.pdf  and http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skittles150.pdf).

 

After this game Anthea stormed out of Poor Richard's and didn't talk to me for a week or so, and I got a rush winning it. One other note is that most of the last 30 moves of the game were played with less than 5 minutes on my clock, and it was a G/30 extra rated game to begin with. Having a monroi made it much easier to notate all the moves, even in time trouble.

 

Keep up the great work!

 

Cheers,

Tim

 

Timothy's 1st Epistle To Paul

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=94890

 

[Event "Poor Richard's Extra Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2008.02.27"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Carson, Anthea"]

[Black "Brennan, Tim"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A00"]

[WhiteElo "1691"]

[BlackElo "1685"]

[PlyCount "110"]

[EventDate "2008.02.27"]

 

1. h4 e5 2. a4 d5 3. e3 c5 4. c3 f5 5. d4 e4 6. Nh3 Qxh4 7. g3 Qf6 8. Nf4 Ne7

9. dxc5 Be6 10. Na3 Nd7 11. Nb5 Kf7 12. Nc7 Nxc5 13. Nxa8 Nc6 14. Nc7 Bd6 15.

Ncxe6 Nxe6 16. Nxd5 Qg5 17. Bc4 Ne5 18. Nf4 Nxc4 19. Nxe6 Kxe6 20. Qb3 Rc8 21.

a5 Ke7 22. Qxb7+ Rc7 23. Qd5 Rc5 24. Qd1 h6 25. b4 Rc8 26. Rh5 Qf6 27. Qb3 Ne5

28. Ra2 Rxc3 29. Qb2 Rxc1+ 30. Ke2 Re1+ 31. Kxe1 Nd3+ 32. Kf1 Nxb2 33. Kg2 Qc3

34. Rxf5 Nd3 35. b5 Ne1+ 36. Kh3 Qc8 37. g4 g6 38. Rd5 h5 39. Rg5 Kf6 40. f4

Nf3 41. Rxg6+ Kxg6 42. f5+ Kg5 43. Rg2 Bc5 44. b6 axb6 45. a6 Qa8 46. gxh5+

Kxh5 47. Rg7 b5 48. Rh7+ Kg5 49. a7 Bxa7 50. Rg7+ Kxf5 51. Rh7 Bxe3 52. Rh5+

Ke6 53. Rh7 Qg8 54. Rh6+ Kd5 55. Rd6+ Kc4 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

 

On April 8th, the CSCC had 9 members in attendance. The participants were paired into teams with combined ratings less than 3400 for a single, round robin Team tournament (G15). The higher rated of one team played the higher rated of the other team while the lower rated players did the same, and the combined score of the teammates was used for the results. The team of David Meliti and Justin Luebbe survived as the top team. Here are the results:

 

Team, Score

 

David Meliti & Justin Luebbe 4.5

Paul Anderson & Gary Frenzel 3.0

Buck Buchanan & Kathy Schneider 2.5

Ken Dail & Dean Brown 2.0

 

Comments From Email

 

Reynolds, Randy, Tuesday, April 08, 2008 5:28 PM

 

Ha ha ha! The Bxc7 move that Tom pointed out just makes the game so much more priceless!! But congrats, Tom; all the best on a fun miniature!

 

[Comment is about this newsletter: (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/2929125-elk-hunter)]

 

Upcoming Events

 

4/15 G/15 tournament, 4-SS, CSCC

4/19 DCC April Showers Tour Event, CSCA

4/22 Josh Bloomer simul, CSCC

4/26 2008 Spring is Sprung One-Day Rated Tournament, CSCA

4/26 14th Annual Pir Maleki Memorial, April 26, NMCO

4/29 Fischer Random tournament: 4-SS, G/15, not rated, CSCC

 

For event details and additional events, see the following websites:

 

Colorado Springs Chess Club: CSCC (http://springschess.org/)

Boulder Chess Club: BCC (http://www.geocities.com/boulderchessclub/)

Colorado State Chess Association: CSCA (http://colorado-chess.com/)

Wyoming Chess Association: WCA (http://www.wyomingchess.com/)

Kansas Chess Association: KCA (http://www.kansaschess.org/)

New Mexico Chess Organization: NMCO (http://www.nmchess.org/)

Categories: 2008, Tim Brennan Week

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