Colorado Springs Chess News

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My name is Paul Anderson (http://www.facebook.com/paul.anderson.904750), and I began the newsletter on March 1, 2004 as a way for me to receive and distribute any last minute schedule changes about local chess events and to put to use the analysis and publishing features of my Fritz 8.

However, I soon realized that I liked reporting on the results of my local club and adding some humorous comments about the games I was publishing.  So, during my chess season (typically February to August) the newsletter will contain at least a couple of articles from me (This Week In Chess and Game Of The Week). 

Every now and then, I will receive chess news, chess games, or other chess stuff from my readers, which I am more than happy to include, as I think it makes for a better newsletter.  It doesn’t matter where you are from or what the news is about (as long as it is about chess); you are welcome to contribute.

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There's Only One Way To...

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 13, 2018 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's August Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30).  It is the beginning of our turtle season at the club when we have five straight months of slow chess.


This game features Grayson Harris against Mark McGough.  Mark was on the losing side of last week's Game Of The Week and was not happy that I forgot to tell the newsletter readers that he did buy me beer after our blitz matches at Target.  He didn't want anyone to get the impression that he is a lazy, freeloader.


So, when his game went the longest in the first round, I decided to make it up to him by picking his game for the Game Of The Week prize ($5.00).  He told me that Grayson had a draw but pushed too hard and gave away the game.  I figured I would use that position for my weekly chess diagram.


I thought I had found the position when the computer said there was only one drawing move.  Can you find the computer move?


White to move



See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205259521


43.a4!


Looks like it might draw. 


43...b6 44.Kc7 Ke8 45.Kb7 Kd7 46.Kxa7 Kc6 47.Ka6


However, Black really has the only move, and it wins!


There's Only One Way To...

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112997


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.08.07"]

[Round "1.5"]

[White "Harris, Grayson"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D38"]

[WhiteElo "1111"]

[BlackElo "1855"]

[PlyCount "122"]

[EventDate "2018.08.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Nf3 d5 5. cxd5

exd5 6. a3 Be7 7. Bf4 c6 8. Qd3 O-O 9. h4 Re8 10. Ng5 Nbd7 11. f3 Nf8 12. e4

dxe4 13. fxe4 Nd5 14. Nxd5 cxd5 15. e5 Bg4 16. Qg3 Qd7 17. Rc1 Rac8 18. Rxc8

Rxc8 19. Bb5 Qxb5 20. Qxg4 Qd7 21. Qxd7 Nxd7 22. Kd2 Bxg5 23. Bxg5 Rc4 24. Kd3

h6 25. b3 Rc6 26. Be7 Nf8 27. Re1 Ne6 28. g4 Nf4+ 29. Kd2 Rc7 30. Bd6 Rc6 31.

Rc1 Rxc1 32. Kxc1 Ne2+ 33. Kd2 Nxd4 34. Kd3 Nxb3 35. Kc3 Na5 36. Kd4 Nc6+ 37.

Kxd5 Nd8 38. h5 Kh7 39. Be7 Nc6 40. Kd6 Nxe7 41. Kxe7 Kg8 42. Kd7 Kf8 43. e6

fxe6 44. Kxe6 Ke8 45. Kd6 Kd8 46. a4 b6 47. Ke6 Ke8 48. Ke5 a6 49. Kd6 b5 50.

axb5 axb5 51. Kc5 Kf7 52. Kxb5 Kf6 53. Kc4 Kg5 54. Kd4 Kxg4 55. Ke4 Kxh5 56.

Kf4 Kh4 57. Kf3 Kh3 58. Kf2 g5 59. Kg1 g4 60. Kh1 g3 61. Kg1 g2 0-1


This Week In Chess


On August 7th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the August Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1989 W7 1.0

2 Laurence Rob Wutt 1948 W8 1.0

3 Peter Barlay 1931 W9 1.0

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1893 W10 1.0

5 Mark McGough 1855 W11 1.0

6 Michael Smith II 1635 W12 1.0

7 William Leo Wolf 1515 L1 0.0

8 Ayush Vispute 1362 L2 0.0

9 Clinton D Eads 1268 L3 0.0

10 Joey Arispe 1140 L4 0.0

11 Grayson Ed Harris 1111 L5 0.0

12 Justin Parker unr. L6 0.0

Mate To Two, Too

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 6, 2018 at 6:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's July One Night Quick event (3SS, G/20; d/5).  The idea behind the tournament was to honor a motion made by members at our annual meeting and attract a different type of chess player.  Since we play slow chess (G/90+30) nine months of the year, it was a chance for quick players to come out and get three rated games. 


Also, the night ended earlier than normal.  So, the early risers could come out, play some chess, and get home before ten o'clock.  So far, the attendance has not matched our slow nights, and there has been some murmurings about getting rid of the quick event.


I can't complain.  I got to play two of the highest rated players in the event.  I took first place.  And I didn't have to direct the tournament. 


In addition, I got a little revenge on Mark McGough.  Ever since I called him my whipping boy (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/43998232-whipping-boy) in 2016, he has stepped up his game against me and has taken back a big chunck of the rating points I had gotten from him.  In fact, this year we are even (+3-3=1) in the seven USCF-rated games we have played.


However, this game put me back on the winning track and moved my total USCF-rated beats on Mark to 61.  Now, I am only 6 more beats away from tying FM Isay Golyak's 67 beats on Mark.


Of course, it isn't helping that Mark and I play a ton of blitz games together.  He is one of my weasel-students.  We play so often that he sees all my secrets and never pays me a dime.  I even buy him pizza at Target's food court before our blitz matches.


However, I think the pizza paid some dividends in this event.  I started using LM Brian Wall's Fishing Pole tricks against Mark and found a bit of an achilles' heel.  Mark can lose sight of the f2 pin in time pressure and give up some miracle mates.


In this position, I was so used to the Fishing Pole style mate that I didn't realize there are two ways to get to mate with two moves.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205247163


Mate To Two, Too

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112967


[Event "July One Night Quick"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.07.31"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "McGough, Mark"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A20"]

[WhiteElo "1734"]

[BlackElo "1916"]

[PlyCount "46"]

[EventDate "2018.07.31"]

[TimeControl "1200"]


1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 Bc5 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e3

Nc6 6. Nge2 d6 7. O-O a6 8. Rb1 Qe8 9. b4 Ba7 10. d3 Bf5 11. Re1 Qd7 12. Nd5

Nxd5 13. cxd5 Ne7 14. Nc3 Bh3 15. Bh1 f5 16. a4 Ng6 17. b5 axb5 18. Rxb5 Bb6

19. Qb3 f4 20. exf4 exf4 21. Ne4 fxg3 22. hxg3 Qg4 23. Ng5 Qxg3+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On July 31st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the July One Night Quick (3SS, G/20;d/5).


Standings. July One Night Quick


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1916 W8 W3 W2 3.0 $9.00 1st

2 Jeffrey Fox 1780 W10 W4 L1 2.0

3 Mark McGough 1734 W5 L1 W6 2.0

4 Michael Smith II 1546 W7 L2 W8 2.0

5 Tristan Cruz 832 L3 W10 W9 2.0 $6.00 u1500/unr

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1714 D9 W7 L3 1.5

7 Joey Arispe 1277 L4 L6 W10 1.0

8 Gerardo Cruz 1222 L1 W9 L4 1.0

9 Zachary Anguiano unr. D6 L8 L5 0.5

10 Ayush Vispute 1131 L2 L5 L7 0.0

P Is For Pin VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 30, 2018 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples. The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 10th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45574844-d-is-for-discovery-vi). The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 14th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45654476-r-is-for-removal-vii).  The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload, which I revisited on June 18th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45755144-o-is-for-overload-vii).


The fourth kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Pin.


Pin is a chess move that immobilizes an opponent's piece.


The Pin is different from the other kinds of tactics in that it does not create multiple threats.  Its main function is to prevent a piece from moving.  A Pin on a target allows that target to be attacked by a lower value piece.  A Pin on a support allows the capture of the piece the support is guarding.


"The defensive power of a pinned piece is only imaginary."

(Aaron Nimzovich)


The Pin works by threatening a low value piece that has a higher value piece (or an ungarded piece) behind it.  The low value piece is stuck (as if with a pin) to the higher value piece due to the loss of material should the low value piece move and allow the capture of the higher value piece.


If the higher value piece is the King, the low value piece is absolutely immobilized, as the rules of Chess do not allow moves where the King could be captured.  Otherwise the Pin is relative, as the opponent can actually move the low value piece if he is willing to accept the loss of material.  The other types of Pins are rare:


  • Absolute (Pins a target to the King)
  • Relative (Pins a low value target to a higher value piece)
  • Cross (Multiple Pins on one piece)
  • Cross-check (blocks check and counter-checks)


Here is an example from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night event:  July Mating Game.  Erasmus Eskeldson, who is closing in on his 50th standard-rated tournament game, got his Bishop pinned to his Queen.


However, Erasmus realized that a Pin against the Queen is not Absolute.  It is a Relative Pin.  The pinned piece can move, and, in this case, it can create a Discovery to get out of the Pin and win material!


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205236332


P Is For Pin VII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112942


[Event "July Mating Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.07.24"]

[Round "3.3"]

[White "Arispe, Joey"]

[Black "Eskeldson, Erasmus"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "1216"]

[BlackElo "1341"]

[PlyCount "64"]

[EventDate "2018.07.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 Nf6 3. c3 e6 4. Nf3 c5 5. h3 Nbd7

6. e3 g6 7. Bd3 Bg7 8. O-O O-O 9. Nbd2 b6 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. Rfe1 Nb8 12. b3 Na6

13. Rad1 Rc8 14. Qb1 Nd7 15. e4 cxd4 16. cxd4 Nb4 17. Bd6 Nxd3 18. Qxd3 dxe4

19. Nxe4 Re8 20. Bh2 Bxe4 21. Qxe4 Nf6 22. Qb7 Re7 23. Qa6 Nd5 24. a3 Rd7 25.

Ne5 Rdc7 26. Nc4 Re7 27. Bd6 Rd7 28. Bh2 Nc7 29. Qxa7 Bxd4 30. Nd6 Rxd6 31.

Bxd6 Qxd6 32. Re4 Bxf2+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On July 24th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the July Mating Game (4SS, G/45;d/10).


Standings. July Mating Game


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1999 W10 W9 W2 W4 4.0 $37.00 1st

2 Mark McGough 1791 W11 W5 L1 W6 3.0 $25.00 2nd

3 Lawrence R Osborn 949 H--- U--- W8 W5 2.5 $16.00 U1300/unr

4 Michael Smith II 1642 L6 W7 W10 L1 2.0

5 Erasmus Eskeldson 1341 W7 L2 W6 L3 2.0 $5.00 GOW

6 Joey Arispe 1216 W4 W11 L5 L2 2.0 $5.00 GOW

7 Ross Inman unr. L5 L4 W11 W10 2.0

8 David Argaez unr. H--- U--- L3 W11 1.5

9 William Leo Wolf 1552 W12 L1 U--- U--- 1.0

10 Nick J Derosier 1312 L1 W12 L4 L7 1.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1254 L2 L6 L7 L8 0.0

12 Braiden Denny 381 L9 L10 U--- U--- 0.0

Flip The Script

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 23, 2018 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the July Mating Game (4SS, G/45; d/10) at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  It is a two-week event with two games each night.  Each player starts with 45 minutes on his clock.  So, it is medium, as far as chess speed is concerned.


The only player to score an upset during the first half of the tournament was Joey Arispe.  He has been coming to the club for almost a year now.  And it looks like he is improving.


Joey's best win was in February when he knocked off his highest rated opponent, Austin Harbach.


That was until the July Mating Game when he face Mike Smith II in the first round.  In violation of club rules, Mike resigned with Mate In 1 on the board.


Now, Joey was facing Scott Williams in the second round.  This time it was not going well.  Joey was going on the attack, but the counterplay was giving Scott a nice material advantage.  However, Joey hung in there and waited for the script to flip. 


Black to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205218166


Flip The Script

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112916


[Event "July Mating Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.07.17"]

[Round "2.3"]

[White "Williams, Scott"]

[Black "Arispe, Joey"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C02"]

[WhiteElo "1254"]

[BlackElo "1216"]

[PlyCount "47"]

[EventDate "2018.07.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. Nf3 cxd4 5. Nxd4

Bc5 6. c3 Nc6 7. Bb5 Nge7 8. O-O a6 9. Qa4 Bd7 10. Nxc6 Nxc6 11. Bxc6 Bxc6 12.

Qg4 Qb6 13. b3 O-O-O 14. Kh1 Bb5 15. Rd1 Bxf2 16. Nd2 Qe3 17. Nc4 Qxc3 18. Bd2

Qc2 19. Rac1 Qxa2 20. Nd6+ Kb8 21. Nxf7 Rc8 22. Nxh8 Rxc1 23. Bxc1 Be2 24. Rd2

0-1


This Week In Chess


On July 17th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the July Mating Game event (4SS, G/45;d/10).


Standings. July Mating Game


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1999 W7 W5 2.0

2 Mark McGough 1791 W8 W6 2.0

3 Joey Arispe 1216 W4 W8 2.0

4 Michael Smith II 1642 L3 W10 1.0

5 William Leo Wolf 1552 W9 L1 1.0

6 Derek Eskeldson 1341 W10 L2 1.0

7 Nick J Derosier 1312 L1 W9 1.0

8 Scott Ch Williams 1254 L2 L3 0.0

9 Braiden Denny 381 L5 L7 0.0

10 Ross Inman unr. L6 L4 0.0

Theoretical vs Practical

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 17, 2018 at 5:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Matt Grinberg


You probably think the title is a reference to theoretical chess versus practical chess.  Actually, I mean the theoretical physicist, Albert Einstein, developer of the theories of special and general relativity, versus the more practical physicist, Robert Oppenheimer, who was the scientist who directed the development of the atomic bomb with the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, New Mexico.


There is a chess game they played against each other in 1933 at Princeton University where Einstein had taken a position after leaving Germany.  It is known that Einstein played chess.  In fact, he was friends with Emanuel Lasker. 


It is not known for sure whether or not Oppenheimer had an interest in chess.   The following is one of only two games known played by Einstein, and it is the only game known played by Oppenheimer.  There is some question as to the authenticity of this game.  Some claim that White was actually Hans Einstein, Albert's son, and the location was the University of California, Berkeley, where he and Oppenheimer were both professors in the late 1940's.   Others claim that Black was really Max Oppenheimer, the artist.


On the other hand, nobody has proved that the game was not played by Albert Einstein against Robert Oppenheimer.  So, here it is - the theoretical physicist versus the practical physicist.


Einstein, Albert vs Oppenheimer, Robert – 1-0

Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, 1933

Ruy Lopez


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4


Einstein is definitely following theory. 4... b5 This is not bad, but it is a bit unusual. Perhaps Oppenheimer is taking a practical approach by avoiding theory?

[The theoretical line is the Closed Ruy Lopez. 4... Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 White has a small edge]


5. Bb3 Nf6 6. O-O


[White could also try 6. Ng5 like a Two Knights Defense. 6... d5 7. exd5 Nd4! (Not 7... Nxd5? 8. Nxf7! like the Fried Liver Variation of the Two Knights, but better. 8... Kxf7 9. Qf3 Ke6 10. Nc3 Nce7 (10... Ncb4?! as in the Fried Liver Variation is useless here because White's bishop defends c2. 11. a3 Black is forced to return the knight) 11. d4 Bb7 12. Bg5 c6 13. O-O-O Black's king will die before it ever finds an escape) 8. O-O Nxb3 9. axb3 h6 10. Nf3 Bg4 11. d3 Qxd5=]


6... Nxe4!?


This definitely takes the game out of theoretical lines. Taking the pawn with Black's king uncastled and White ready to play Re1 is risky.

[6... Be7 7. Re1 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 transposes again to the Closed Ruy Lopez]


7. Re1


[7. d4 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. c3 transposes to the Open Defense of the Ruy Lopez]


7... d5 8. a4N?


A novelty and Einstein's only bad move of the game.

[8. Nc3 worked nicely in the following game. 8... Nxc3 9. dxc3 Be6 10. a4 Rb8? (10... b4 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Rxe5 White is better) 11. axb5 axb5 12. Ra6 Qd7 13. Rxc6 Qxc6 14. Nxe5 Qc5 15. Nxf7 Kxf7 16. Qf3 Ke7 17. Bxd5 Rb6 18. Bg5 Kd7 19. Bxe6 Rxe6 20. Qf7 Re7 21. Bxe7 Bxe7 22. Qe6 1-0, Esserman, Marc (USA) 2394 - Simpson, Ronald (USA) 2304 , Internet 9/ 8/2009 US Chess League]


8... b4?


Oppenheimer is so worried about what Einstein is up to with a4, that he misses his one chance of the game.

[White is embarrassed after 8... Bc5! 9. Re2 Nxf2 10. Rxf2 Bxf2 11. Kxf2 e4 12. Qe2 O-O 13. Ne1 Material is even, but White's pieces are bottled up and his king is exposed. Black should win]


9. d3 Nc5?


Oppenheimer begins his slide into oblivion.

[The knight is needed for defense. 9... Nf6 10. Bf4 Be7 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5 O-O 13. Nd2 Be6=]


10. Nxe5 Ne7


[Or 10... Nxe5 11. Rxe5 Be6 12. Bxd5 when White is a pawn up]


11. Qf3 f6??


It is tempting to stop mate and at the same time counter attack against White's knight, but this is very bad because it exposes Black's king on the h5-e8 diagonal.

[11... Be6 12. Nd2 White is better, but Black still has good chances]


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205209891


12. Qh5! g6


Evidently Oppenheimer thought this would refute Einstein's attack because now he is threatening two of Einstein's pieces. But he overlooked that the knight on e7 and the h-pawn are both pinned.


13. Nxg6! hxg6 14. Qxh8 Nxb3 15. cxb3 Qd6??


A second horrific blunder, effectively ending the game.

[After 15... Kf7 16. Qh7 Bg7 17. Bh6 Nf5 Black is down an exchange for nothing, but still has some chances]


16. Bh6 Kd7


There is no way to save the bishop.


17. Bxf8 Bb7 18. Qg7 Re8 19. Nd2 c5 20. Rad1 a5


21. Nc4!


A nice way to wind up the game. Black has no way to hold e7 and save his queen. His position falls apart. 21... dxc4 22. dxc4 Qxd1 23. Rxd1 Kc8 24. Bxe7 Black resigns. [1:0]


Theoretical vs Practical

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112872


[Event "Princeton University"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1933.??.??"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Einstein, Albert"]

[Black "Oppenheimer, Robert"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C78"]

[PlyCount "47"]

[EventDate "1933.??.??"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 b5 5. Bb3

Nf6 6. O-O Nxe4 7. Re1 d5 8. a4 b4 9. d3 Nc5 10. Nxe5 Ne7 11. Qf3 f6 12. Qh5+

g6 13. Nxg6 hxg6 14. Qxh8 Nxb3 15. cxb3 Qd6 16. Bh6 Kd7 17. Bxf8 Bb7 18. Qg7

Re8 19. Nd2 c5 20. Rad1 a5 21. Nc4 dxc4 22. dxc4 Qxd1 23. Rxd1+ Kc8 24. Bxe7

1-0


This Week In Chess


On July 10th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the July Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. July Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1789 W10 L4 W7 W2 W8 W9 5.0 $43.00 1st

2 Earle P Wikle 1933 W16 W13 W6 L1 W10 L3 4.0 $14.00 2nd

3 Paul D Anderson 1893 H--- W12 H--- U--- W7 W2 4.0 $14.00 2nd

4 Josh S Bloomer 2209 W7 W1 W11 U--- U--- U--- 3.0

5 Sara Herman 1848 W12 W17 W16 U--- U--- U--- 3.0

6 Jeffrey Fox 1813 W8 L11 L2 L7 W12 W10 3.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 1703 L4 W8 L1 W6 L3 W14 3.0 $16.00 U1750

8 Gerardo Cruz 1113 L6 L7 W18 W12 L1 W15 3.0 $16.00 U1750

9 Mark McGough 1713 H--- U--- U--- W15 W14 L1 2.5

10 Tristan Cruz 708 L1 D15 W17 X13 L2 L6 2.5

11 Daniel Herman 1969 W15 W6 L4 U--- U--- U--- 2.0

12 Derek Eskeldson 1221 L5 L3 W15 L8 L6 W17 2.0

13 Laurence Rob Wutt 1769 W18 L2 H--- F10 U--- U--- 1.5

14 Michael Smith II 1567 H--- U--- U--- W17 L9 L7 1.5

15 Dean W Brown 1400 L11 D10 L12 L9 W17 L8 1.5

16 Joey Arispe 1279 L2 W18 L5 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

17 Lawrence R Osborn 961 H--- L5 L10 L14 L15 L12 0.5

18 Shaun Pat Creamer 559 L13 L16 L8 U--- U--- U--- 0.0

A Horse With No Game

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 12, 2018 at 4:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the July Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5) at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  It was the creation of the club's Vice President, Peter Barlay. 


One of the jobs the officers do for the club is make the schedule each year.  The current board has added a lot of slow chess (9 months).  However, some events were given to us from past boards like the Colorado Springs City Speed Chess Championship in January.


One of the historic events given to the current board from past members at an annual meeting is our July Mating Game (see our ad in Chess Life).  It is coming up next Tuesday.  Since it is just a two week tournament, we had a hole in the calendar to fill.  So, Peter suggested the July Quick Six event.



Round 4 of the July Quick Six, Mark McGough vs Dean Brown


I was not planning to play in the tournament.  I was going to direct and take care of club business.  Directing gives me more time to do other things like taking pictures.  I was eager to try out some of the features on my phone's camera.  The above photo was a test of the zoom feature.  The camera also has a panoramic setting.




Unfortunately, when Larry Wutt didn't show up, my job as photographer was over.  I jumped into the tournament to keep the number of players even and prevent someone from not getting to play a game each round.


However, chess at the Colorado Springs Chess Club can be brutal.  It is like riding through the desert.


After two games in the desert sun

My skin began to turn red

After three games in the desert fun

I was looking at a basic mate

And the story it told of a rook that flowed

Made me sad to think it was late


You see I've been through the desert on a horse with no game

It felt good not to use my brain

In the desert you can't remember your move

'Cause there ain't no one for to give you no groove


I won all three of my games in the tournament.  However, I wasn't playing well.  I guessed on a Rook Sacrifice against Brian Rountree, and he missed the saving move.  I found the wrong move against Earle Wikle, but he was nice enough to give me another shot at finding it. 


I was glad to get out of there and catch the end of the 78th Annual Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo Parade!  I met an Indian with a horse who could play chess (but not well) and told them I played 26...R8e4.  They just stared at me.




See if you can find the right move.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205200785


A Horse With No Game

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112849


[Event "July Quick Six"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.07.10"]

[Round "6.1"]

[White "Wikle, Earle"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A22"]

[WhiteElo "1933"]

[BlackElo "1893"]

[PlyCount "54"]

[EventDate "2018.07.03"]

[TimeControl "1440+5"]


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. g3 Bc5 4. Bg2 O-O 5. e3

Nc6 6. Nge2 d6 7. a3 a5 8. d4 exd4 9. exd4 Bb6 10. O-O Re8 11. Rb1 Bf5 12. Ra1

Ne4 13. Nxe4 Bxe4 14. f3 Bg6 15. Kh1 Qf6 16. d5 Nd4 17. Nxd4 Qxd4 18. Re1 Bd3

19. f4 Bxc4 20. Bd2 Bxd5 21. Bc3 Bxg2+ 22. Kxg2 Qxd1 23. Rexd1 Re2+ 24. Kh3

Rae8 25. Rd5 f6 26. g4 R8e4 27. Rf1 R4e3+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On July 3rd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the July Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. July Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2209 W10 W6 W4 3.0

2 Earle P Wikle 1933 W11 W7 W9 3.0

3 Sara Herman 1848 W12 W15 W11 3.0

4 Daniel Herman 1969 W14 W9 L1 2.0

5 Paul D Anderson 1893 H--- W12 H--- 2.0

6 Aleksand Bozhenov 1789 W8 L1 W10 2.0

7 Laurence Rob Wutt 1769 W16 L2 H--- 1.5

8 Tristan Cruz 708 L6 D14 W15 1.5

9 Jeffrey Fox 1813 W13 L4 L2 1.0

10 Brian Jo Rountree 1703 L1 W13 L6 1.0

11 Joey Arispe 1279 L2 W16 L3 1.0

12 Derek Eskeldson 1221 L3 L5 W14 1.0

13 Gerardo Cruz 1113 L9 L10 W16 1.0

14 Dean W Brown 1400 L4 D8 L12 0.5

15 Lawrence R Osborn 961 H--- L3 L8 0.5

16 Shaun Pat Creamer 559 L7 L11 L13 0.0

Mobility Move

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 5, 2018 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from Tristan Cruz.  He is a newcomer to the Colorado Springs Chess Club on Tuesday nights.  He started chess back in 2014 as a youngster.  However, he didn't stick with it and took a 4 year break.  Now, he is in Colorado and looking to establish his rating.


Most of the time, I pick a Game Of The Week because of a tactical position I find in the game and can use as a chess diagram.  This week is different.


Chess Tactics are moves that can be played in one move and create a special pattern to cause a threat or threats that will result in a gain of material.  Sometimes these moves have to be strung together in a series of moves to actually realize the gain in material.  Then I call them Tactical Combinations.


However, these patterns can be used with Chess Strategy as well.  I simplify Chess Strategy into three kinds:  Mate, Material, and Mobility.  I call it the 3Ms of Chess.  Mobility refers to the speed and scope of your pieces (open files, open diagonals, outposts, etc.).


So, as I looked over Tristan's game, I thought that this position is not really a tactic but rather a strategic move that wins material.  See if you can find the Mobility Move.


Hint:  Mobility Moves can not only increase your pieces' Mobility but also decrease your opponents' Mobility.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205190212


Mobility Move

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112813


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.06.26"]

[Round "4.12"]

[White "Arispe, Joey"]

[Black "Cruz, Tristan"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C02"]

[WhiteElo "1192"]

[BlackElo "745"]

[PlyCount "86"]

[EventDate "2018.06.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Nf3 f6 6.

Bb5 Qb6 7. Bxc6+ Qxc6 8. Bf4 cxd4 9. cxd4 Bb4+ 10. Nbd2 b6 11. Rc1 Qb5 12. Qc2

Ba6 13. Qc6+ Qxc6 14. Rxc6 Bc8 15. O-O Bd7 16. Rc7 g5 17. Be3 g4 18. Ne1 Bb5

19. Rg7 f5 20. Nc2 Bxf1 21. Nxb4 Bb5 22. Bg5 Rc8 23. Nb1 h6 24. Be3 a5 25. a4

Be2 26. Na2 Rc2 27. Nac3 Bd3 28. Na3 Rxb2 29. Nab5 Bxb5 30. axb5 a4 31. Rc7 Rc2

32. Nxd5 Rxc7 33. Nxc7+ Ke7 34. Na6 Kd7 35. Kf1 Ne7 36. Nb4 Nd5 37. Nxd5 exd5

38. Bc1 Ra8 39. Ba3 Ra5 40. Ke2 Rxb5 41. Kd2 Rb3 42. Bd6 a3 43. Kc2 a2 0-1


This Week In Chess


On June 26th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finised the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W17 W4 W3 W5 4.0 $46.00 1st

2 Daniel Herman 2051 W15 L5 W18 W8 3.0 $8.00 2nd

3 Sara Herman 1971 W11 W8 L1 W9 3.0 $8.00 2nd

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W12 L1 W10 W13 3.0 $8.00 2nd

5 Mark McGough 1779 W20 W2 W6 L1 3.0 $8.00 2nd

6 Paul D Anderson 2032 D10 W14 L5 W18 2.5

7 Peter Barlay 1927 W19 W9 U--- U--- 2.0

8 Michael Smith II 1635 W22 L3 W20 L2 2.0

9 Dean W Brown 1571 W13 L7 W12 L3 2.0 $7.00 U1600/unr

10 Ayush Vispute 1207 D6 D15 L4 W14 2.0 $7.00 U1600/unr

11 Joey Arispe 1192 L3 L20 W22 W21 2.0 $7.00 U1600/unr

12 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L4 W21 L9 W17 2.0 $7.00 U1600/unr

13 Joel Hicks unr. L9 W19 W17 L4 2.0 $7.00 U1600/unr

14 Scott Ch Williams 1243 H--- L6 W15 L10 1.5 $5.00 GOW

15 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L2 D10 L14 W20 1.5 $5.00 GOW

16 William Leo Wolf 1580 W21 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

17 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W22 L13 L12 1.0

18 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- L2 L6 1.0

19 Shirley Herman 1105 L7 L13 L21 W22 1.0

20 Daniel J Rupp 973 L5 W11 L8 L15 1.0

21 Tristan Cruz 745 L16 L12 W19 L11 1.0 $5.00 GOW

22 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L8 L17 L11 L19 0.0

A Tale Of The Scottch Tape

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 27, 2018 at 6:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Scott Williams.  He has been a regular on Tuesday nights since 2015. 


One of our scholastic players, Ayush "Panda" Vispute, gave him the nickname "Scottch," and I have embraced it.


His dedication to chess is unquestioned.  He will forsake all bathroom stops on his long drive from Pueblo West just so he can check in on time.  Therefore, he has become the key master for our restroom at the club.  No one gets to use the facilities until Scottch shows up and unlocks the door.


We are the first club to implement the new transgender policy from the USCF that has banned gender-specific bathrooms.  We had to board up the Men's restroom to get in compliance since the urinal was offensive to some non-gender-specific humans who have a hard time making use of that appliance.


Scottch has yet to break the 1400 barrier, but I felt like he has been streching his patience level in our last game.  He didn't throw away a decent position on a spectulative attack like he had in our past encounters.  He continued to find good moves until he got under 10 minutes.  Then he missed a tactic shot.


A little more practice on seeing tactics quicker and Scottch should rocket past 1400 and possibly meet me somewhere in the middle of our current ratings.  So, here is a position where Scottch found the 2nd best move.


"If you find a good move, look for a better one"

2nd World Champion Emanuel Lasker


White to move


 

See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205167570


A Tale Of The Scottch Tape

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112794


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.06.19"]

[Round "3.8"]

[White "Williams, Scott"]

[Black "Cruz, Gerardo"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "1243"]

[BlackElo "1214"]

[PlyCount "71"]

[EventDate "2018.06.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 d6 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bg4 4. Bc4 Nbd7 5. d4

c5 6. h3 cxd4 7. Ng5 e6 8. Qxd4 Bh5 9. O-O e5 10. Qe3 h6 11. Nf3 a6 12. Be2 Nc5

13. Ne1 Bg6 14. Bf3 Ne6 15. Nd5 Rc8 16. Nxf6+ Qxf6 17. Qb3 Qe7 18. Be3 f5 19.

exf5 Bxf5 20. Bxb7 Rc7 21. Bxa6 Bxh3 22. Bd3 Bg4 23. Bg6+ Kd8 24. Bb6 Be2 25.

Bxc7+ Nxc7 26. Qb8+ Kd7 27. Bf5+ Ne6 28. Qb7+ Kd8 29. Qb3 Bxf1 30. Kxf1 g6 31.

Bxe6 Qc7 32. Rd1 Be7 33. Nf3 Rf8 34. Qd5 Qa7 35. Qc6 Qc7 36. Qa8+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On June 19th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W13 W6 W4 3.0

2 Mark McGough 1779 W18 W3 W10 3.0

3 Daniel Herman 2051 W20 L2 W14 2.0

4 Sara Herman 1971 W16 W7 L1 2.0

5 Peter Barlay 1927 W21 W8 U--- 2.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W17 L1 W15 2.0

7 Michael Smith II 1635 W22 L4 W18 2.0

8 Dean W Brown 1571 W9 L5 W17 2.0

9 Joel Hicks unr. L8 W21 W13 2.0

10 Paul D Anderson 2032 D15 W11 L2 1.5

11 Scott Ch Williams 1243 H--- L10 W20 1.5

12 William Leo Wolf 1580 W19 U--- U--- 1.0

13 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W22 L9 1.0

14 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- L3 1.0

15 Ayush Vispute 1207 D10 D20 L6 1.0

16 Joey Arispe 1192 L4 L18 W22 1.0

17 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L6 W19 L8 1.0

18 Daniel J Rupp 973 L2 W16 L7 1.0

19 Tristan Cruz 745 L12 L17 W21 1.0

20 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L3 D15 L11 0.5

21 Shirley Herman 1105 L5 L9 L19 0.0

22 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L7 L13 L16 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $46.00; 2nd $31.00; U1600/unr $20.00; U1200 $13.00

O Is For Overload VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 18, 2018 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 10th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45574844-d-is-for-discovery-vi).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 14th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45654476-r-is-for-removal-vii).  The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload.


Overload is a chess move that attacks a target.


The Overload is played when the player creates a threat on a target that cannot be defended.  The classic example is choosing a target and piling more attackers on it than supports the defender can muster.  When the number of attackers are greater than the number of supports, material can be won through a series of captures.  Each capture creates a new target until the final support is exhausted and an unguarded target appears.


However, the Overload is, perhaps, the most broad kind of tactic.  Not only does it use multiple attackers on one target, but also it uses a single attacker on multiple targets.  The idea is the same:  to gain a target than cannot be defended.   So, most players will become familiar with the different types of Overload:


  • Battery (Overload with multiple attackers on a file or diagonal)
  • Fork (Overload with multiple targets by the Knight)
  • Double Attack (Overload with multiple targets by the other pieces)
  • Over-Worked Piece (Overload with multiple targets)
  • Skewer (Overload with multiple targets where a high value piece is in front)


It is my Father's Day tradition to publish a win (over me) from my dad.  This game occurred early in our email match when my dad had the upper hand.  However, neither of us was good enough to catch the mistake in this position.


Black to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205146606


O Is For Overload VII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112776


[Event "1-3"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1997.01.14"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A45"]

[PlyCount "124"]

[EventDate "1996.10.04"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 Ne4 3. Bh4 d5 4. f3 Nd6 5. Nc3 c6 6. e4 Qa5 7.

Qd2 h6 8. Bd3 e6 9. e5 Nc4 10. Bxc4 dxc4 11. a3 b5 12. Nge2 Qc7 13. Qf4 Be7 14.

Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Qe4 Bb7 16. Qe3 O-O 17. O-O Nd7 18. Ne4 Nb6 19. Nd6 a5 20. c3 Ba6

21. f4 f5 22. Ng3 Nc8 23. Nxc8 Rfxc8 24. Nh5 Qh4 25. Qf3 Bb7 26. g3 Qh3 27.

Rad1 Rc7 28. g4 Qxg4+ 29. Qxg4 fxg4 30. Kf2 Rd8 31. Rg1 Kf8 32. Rxg4 c5 33. Rg3

cxd4 34. cxd4 b4 35. axb4 axb4 36. Rg6 c3 37. bxc3 bxc3 38. Ke3 c2 39. Rc1 Bd5

40. Rg3 Bb3 41. Rg2 Rc3+ 42. Kd2 Rc4 43. Nxg7 Rdxd4+ 44. Ke3 Rd1 45. Rcxc2 Rxc2

46. Nxe6+ Kf7 47. Rxc2 Bxc2 48. Nd4 Bb1 49. Nf3 Rh1 50. Kf2 Be4 51. Nd4 Rxh2+

52. Ke3 Bh7 53. f5 Rh5 54. Ke4 Rh4+ 55. Ke3 Rxd4 56. Kxd4 Bxf5 57. Ke3 Kg6 58.

Kf4 h5 59. Kf3 Kg5 60. Kg3 h4+ 61. Kf3 h3 62. Kg3 Bg4 0-1


This Week In Chess


On June 12th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W11 W7 2.0

2 Sara Herman 1971 W18 W8 2.0

3 Peter Barlay 1927 W19 W10 2.0

4 Mark McGough 1779 W14 W6 2.0

5 Paul D Anderson 2032 D12 W16 1.5

6 Daniel Herman 2051 W17 L4 1.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W13 L1 1.0

8 Michael Smith II 1635 W20 L2 1.0

9 William Leo Wolf 1580 W21 U--- 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1571 W15 L3 1.0

11 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W20 1.0

12 Ayush Vispute 1207 D5 D17 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L7 W21 1.0

14 Daniel J Rupp 973 L4 W18 1.0

15 Joel Hicks unr. L10 W19 1.0

16 Scott Ch Williams 1243 H--- L5 0.5

17 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L6 D12 0.5

18 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L14 0.0

19 Shirley Herman 1105 L3 L15 0.0

20 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L8 L11 0.0

21 Tristan Cruz 745 L9 L13 0.0

Cruz Control

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 12, 2018 at 4:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's June Swiss 90 event.  The tournament is one of two slow time control, monthly events the club does each quarter.  The first month of a quarter is scheduled for the club's special events, which are typically much faster time controls.


However, even with the slower time control (G/90+30), some games end well before the allotted time.  This can mean that someone who comes with another person then has to wait until the other person finishes his game.  And these games can go three to five hours, depending on the number of moves.


This week, I ran into another problem.  My game was played on another player's set, which looked similar to the club sets.  This player finished quickly while my game was the last to finish.  The player who was done wanted his set to leave.


I decided to offer the player an extra game.  Therefore, I would not have to interrupt my opponent to replace the board.  Of course, the only player available to play an extra game was Tristan Cruz, who was willing to play.  However, his father finished his game just after I got Tristan started on an extra game.


Now, Tristan's father would have to wait for his son to finish his second game of the night.  So, I arranged another extra game for Tristan's father, Gerardo Cruz. 


It worked out well for Gerardo as he got to kill the time during Tristan's game with a victory of his own when he found the winning move in this position.

 

Black to move



See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205135082


Cruz Control

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112754


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.06.05"]

[Round "1.12"]

[White "Herman, Shirley"]

[Black "Cruz, Gerardo"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A53"]

[WhiteElo "1105"]

[BlackElo "1214"]

[PlyCount "88"]

[EventDate "2018.06.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 h6 4. Qb3 Nbd7 5. Bf4

c5 6. Nf3 g5 7. Bg3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Nc5 9. Qc2 e5 10. Nf3 Bg7 11. Rd1 Be6 12. Nxe5

O-O 13. b4 Na6 14. a3 Qe7 15. Nf3 Rfd8 16. e4 Rac8 17. Nb5 d5 18. Nxa7 Nxb4 19.

axb4 Qxb4+ 20. Qd2 Qxd2+ 21. Rxd2 Ra8 22. Bc7 Nxe4 23. Bxd8 Nxd2 24. Nxd2 Rxd8

25. Be2 Bc3 26. Nb5 Bb4 27. Bd3 dxc4 28. Nc7 Rxd3 29. Nxe6 fxe6 30. Ke2 Rxd2+

31. Ke3 c3 32. Ra1 Bc5+ 33. Ke4 c2 34. Rf1 Rd1 35. Ke5 Rxf1 36. h4 gxh4 37. g3

hxg3 38. f4 Rxf4 39. Kxe6 Kh7 40. Ke5 c1=Q 41. Ke6 Qe3+ 42. Kd7 Rd4+ 43. Kc8

Qe7 44. Kb8 Rd8# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On June 5th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W12 1.0

2 Daniel Herman 2051 W13 1.0

3 Sara Herman 1971 W14 1.0

4 Peter Barlay 1927 W15 1.0

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W16 1.0

6 Mark McGough 1779 W17 1.0

7 Michael Smith II 1635 W18 1.0

8 William Leo Wolf 1580 W19 1.0

9 Dean W Brown 1571 W20 1.0

10 Paul D Anderson 2032 D11 0.5

11 Ayush Vispute 1207 D10 0.5

12 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 0.0

13 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L2 0.0

14 Joey Arispe 1192 L3 0.0

15 Shirley Herman 1105 L4 0.0

16 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L5 0.0

17 Daniel J Rupp 973 L6 0.0

18 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L7 0.0

19 Tristan Cruz 745 L8 0.0

20 Joel Hicks unr. L9 0.0

That's Your Excuse!

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 5, 2018 at 4:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


Brian Rountree burned up the competition at the May tournament of Club Chess like Kilauea throught the Hawaiian islands.  The damage was so complete there was no one left to stop him.  Well, that is until I got the call.  A Black Knight appeared in the sky, and I rushed over to the crime scene to put an end to Brian's devastation.



Paul Anderson (left) goes over the game with Brian Rountree (right)


This week's game comes from Brian Rountree and his chess blog:


https://linuxguyonfics.wordpress.com/2018/05/31/last-round-surprise/


"I know the local readership of this blog’s typical reaction 'Oh, look, that’s your excuse!'"


"I would have already made Expert if it weren't for playing Expert Paul Anderson.


My record against Paul is a shocking 5 wins, 34 losses and no draws (nearly all of these games, if not all played against him, I was a Class A player)!


In my last game against him, I was +2 as Black and still lost.  He practically makes me regurgitate my advantages against him in time-pressure (he also plays better in the later stages of a game).  I don't care how one does the math, if I had never played Paul I am a walking Expert.


It doesn't help to think about rating points like that, it's a total distraction.  It's almost a cliche the number of players who have made Expert, only to slam back down to their 1800 floor.  This happens at many levels.


In Canada, there are no floors, people make Expert and then can go below 1700 - I've seen this happen to a friend of mine.  Imagine going from 2034 to under 1700 at some point, and then starting the assault back to the top.


Experts, don't get to stay Experts, unlike Masters who stay Masters.  Most Experts in CO have figured out that the real goal, therefore, is to make Master.


For someone to casually hold an Expert rating, year after year, against lower-rated players, would suggest that they are still under-rated, particularly when they do beat Masters when given the opportunity (e.g., Paul A.)."


White to Mate In 2


See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205118504


That’s Your Excuse!

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112727

 

[Event "Club Chess May Classical"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.30"]

[Round "5.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Rountree, Brian"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "2017"]

[BlackElo "1870"]

[PlyCount "57"]

[EventDate "2018.05.30"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. Nf3 c5 5. e3 Nc6

6. O-O Be7 7. b3 O-O 8. Bb2 b6 9. Nbd2 Bb7 10. Re1 Rc8 11. c3 Qc7 12. Rc1 Rfd8

13. Bf1 e5 14. Bh3 e4 15. Bxc8 Bxc8 16. Nh4 Bg4 17. f3 exf3 18. Nhxf3 Ne4 19.

Kg2 Bd6 20. Qc2 Bxg3 21. Rf1 Bxh2 22. Nxe4 Bxf3+ 23. Rxf3 dxe4 24. Qxe4 Ne7 25.

Rh1 f5 26. Qe6+ Kh8 27. Rxh2 Rd6 28. Rxh7+ Kxh7 29. Rh3# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 29th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held its May One Night Quick event (4SS, G/20;d/5).


Standings. May One Night Quick


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1899 W6 W10 D2 W5 3.5 $10.50 1st

2 Mark McGough 1682 W9 W4 D1 W8 3.5 $10.50 1st

3 Michael Smith II 1572 L7 W11 W6 W4 3.0

4 Dean W Brown 1400 W14 L2 W7 L3 2.0

5 Larry Turner 1652 L13 W7 W8 L1 2.0

6 Joey Arispe 1272 L1 W12 L3 W11 2.0 $2.50 U1300

7 Clinton D Eads 985 W3 L5 L4 W14 2.0 $2.50 U1300

8 Calvin P Dejong 1588 W11 W13 L5 L2 2.0

9 Erasmus Eskeldson 1233 L2 W14 L10 W12 2.0

10 William Leo Wolf 1418 W12 L1 W9 U--- 2.0

11 Gerardo Cruz 1055 L8 L3 W13 L6 1.0

12 Tristan Cruz 456 L10 L6 W14 L9 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1127 W5 L8 L11 U--- 1.0

14 Douglas N Clark 445 L4 L9 L12 L7 0.0

The Tortoise And The Raccoon

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 26, 2018 at 5:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


Once upon a time there was a tortoise who, boasting how he could play chess better than anyone else, was forever teasing the raccoon for its ludicrous middle-game tactics.  Then one day, the raccoon answered back:  “Who do you think you are?  There’s no denying you’re good, but even you can be beaten!”  The raccoon squealed with laughter.


A game was planned, and the next day at the Colorado Springs Chess Club they stood at the board.  When the clock was winding down, the tortoise fell asleep because he was trying to stay at two minutes.


When the tortoise awoke, it was Mating.  "How is this possible?" the tortoise asked.


“The rabid raccoon makes King's Gambit players go insane and sacrifice pieces wildly!” LM Brian Wall said.


This week's game comes from Brian Rountree and his chess blog:


https://linuxguyonfics.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/the-raccoon/


"I have to give credit to Mark, he can defend, and likes to combine attack with defense;  in almost any irrational position, he whips up a defense and is quick to defend first.  Mark is more at home, when positions break down, than am I."


Black to Mate In 4


See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205095791


The Tortoise And The Raccoon

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112702


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.22"]

[Round "4.2"]

[White "Rountree, Brian"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C34"]

[WhiteElo "1868"]

[BlackElo "1770"]

[PlyCount "72"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 h5 4. Bc4 h4 5. d4 g5

6. Nc3 Bb4 7. O-O Bxc3 8. bxc3 d6 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Nxg5+ Qxg5 11. Bxf4 Qh5 12.

Qd3 Kg6 13. Qc4 Nf6 14. e5 Ne8 15. exd6 Nxd6 16. Qxc7 Nf5 17. Rae1 Nc6 18. Bd2

Rh7 19. Qf4 Bd7 20. d5 Nce7 21. c4 Rc8 22. Re4 a6 23. Rb1 b5 24. d6 Ng8 25. c5

Rxc5 26. c3 Nf6 27. Re7 Nxe7 28. dxe7 Rxe7 29. Qd6 Qe5 30. Qd3+ Bf5 31. Qf1

Bxb1 32. Qxb1+ Qe4 33. Qb3 Rd5 34. Qb2 Rxd2 35. Qxd2 Qe3+ 36. Qxe3 Rxe3 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 22nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Daniel Herman 2056 W8 D9 W4 D2 3.0 $26.75 1st

2 Sara Herman 1995 W15 W3 D5 D1 3.0 $26.75 1st

3 Mark McGough 1770 W21 L2 W14 W5 3.0 $26.75 1st + $5.00 GOW

4 Michael Smith II 1617 W13 W19 L1 W8 3.0 $26.75 1st + $5.00 GOW

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W18 W6 D2 L3 2.5

6 Paul D Anderson 2032 W14 L5 D9 W13 2.5

7 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W11 H--- U--- W10 2.5

8 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W21 W13 L4 2.0

9 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W16 D1 D6 U--- 2.0

10 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- W17 L7 2.0

11 Christophe Motley 1541 L7 H--- W20 U--- 1.5

12 Ross Inman unr. H--- U--- U--- W19 1.5

13 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L4 W16 L8 L6 1.0 $3.75 U1300

14 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L6 W18 L3 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300

15 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L17 W21 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300

16 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L9 L13 W18 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300 + $5.00 GOW

17 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W15 L10 U--- 1.0

18 Shirley Herman 1174 L5 L14 L16 D20 0.5

19 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L4 U--- L12 0.5

20 Dean W Brown 1598 U--- U--- L11 D18 0.5

21 Daniel J Rupp 973 L3 L8 L15 U--- 0.0

Revengers Insanity War

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 21, 2018 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (3)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the May Swiss 90 event at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  It was won by my new hero, the Panda! 


For some reason, the Swiss Sys pairing program has to shorten players names, especially those who registered with a middle name.  In this case, it abbreviated Ayush Vispute's middle name to Pan. 


Ayush wanted me to know that was not his real middle name.  I took a stab in the dark and made a guess at what his name could be:  Panda.  It is an inside joke, as many of the abbreviations are quite comical.  Ayush noticed that Scott Williams looked like "Scottch" Williams, and I always think Brian Rountree is from Petticoat Junction, as his name is listed as "Brian Jo" Rountree.


I hope Ayush doesn't mind my nickname for him.  It makes him seem like a super hero to me.  Kind of like Ant Man, only with the power to eat bamboo.


Well, this super hero just took down the club's nemesis, Shirley Herman.  Shirley is the chess equivalent of Thanos The Mad Titan in Marvel Comic's "Avengers:  Invinity War."  She is on a mission to kill half of the chess clubs in the universe, abuse half the tournament directors (TDs), destroy half the volunteers, and make half the children cry.


We thought we were in the half to be killed when she was suspended from the Colorado Springs Chess Club  for a profanity-lace rant in 2016.  However, we may have gained a reprieve, as the Denver Chess Club's board voted to suspend  her on May 15th, and she is already on hostile terms with Club Chess!!, who she actively attacks on social media.


Now, she is going after volunteer TD, Earle Wikle.


In time, you will know what it's like to lose, to feel, so desperately, that you're right, yet to fail all the same.  Dread it!  Run from it!  Destiny still arrives!


However, it is my hope that I can assemble the revengers and come to Earle's aid.


Evacuate the playing hall!  Engage all suspensions!  And get this man a shield!




The first blow was struck by the Panda, but it may take more united action to end this threat to half the chess clubs.  God be with us!


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205084817


Revengers Insanity War

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112687

 

[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.15"]

[Round "3.9"]

[White "Vispute, Ayush"]

[Black "Herman, Shirley"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B15"]

[WhiteElo "1185"]

[BlackElo "1174"]

[PlyCount "33"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Bc4 Bf5 5. f3 e6

6. fxe4 Bg6 7. Nf3 Bb4 8. Qd3 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Nf6 10. Qe3 Bxe4 11. Ng5 Bxg2 12.

Nxf7 Qe7 13. Rg1 Kxf7 14. Rxg2 Nbd7 15. Ba3 Qxa3 16. Qxe6+ Kf8 17. Qf7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 15th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Sara Herman 1995 W13 W6 D3 2.5

2 Daniel Herman 2056 W7 D4 W5 2.5

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W19 W9 D1 2.5

4 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W16 D2 D9 2.0

5 Michael Smith II 1617 W12 W17 L2 2.0 $5.00 GOW

6 Mark McGough 1770 W18 L1 W14 2.0

7 Clinton D Eads 1310 L2 W18 W12 2.0

8 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- W15 2.0

9 Paul D Anderson 2032 W14 L3 D4 1.5

10 Christophe Motley 1541 L11 H--- W20 1.5

11 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W10 H--- U--- 1.5

12 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L5 W16 L7 1.0

13 Joey Arispe 1192 L1 L15 W18 1.0

14 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L9 W19 L6 1.0

15 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W13 L8 1.0

16 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L4 L12 W19 1.0

17 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L5 U--- 0.5

18 Daniel J Rupp 973 L6 L7 L13 0.0

19 Shirley Herman 1174 L3 L14 L16 0.0

20 Dean W Brown 1598 U--- U--- L10 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $44.00; 2nd $29.00; U1800 $19.00; U1300 $13.00

R Is For Removal VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 14, 2018 at 4:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 10th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45574844-d-is-for-discovery-vi).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal.


Removal is a chess move that attacks a support.


The Removal is played when the player stops an opponent's piece from supporting the actual target.  The supporting piece will typically be of an equal or lesser value than the attacking piece.  However, the Removal can give up material, as the protection on the real target is now gone and creates a second attack that cannot be defended.


The target can be the King (Mate threat), a valuable piece (Material threat), or even a square (Mobility threat).


Different types of Removals are referred to by different names, but the idea is the same: The support of the target is removed.  Here are some names for the different types of Removal:

  • Clearance (Removal by passing support)
  • Deflection (Removal by forcing support to move)
  • Interference (Removal by interposition; Interception)
  • Undermining (Removal by capturing support; trade)
  • Sacrifice (Removal by capturing support; Exchange; Greek Gift, Desperado)


Here is an example from an email match I played with my Dad.  I am a Pawn ahead in Material.  However, one Pawn doesn't guarantee success.  Can you find the killer move?


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205070405


R Is For Removal VII

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112651


[Event "12-10-6"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2002.10.01"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D30"]

[PlyCount "101"]

[EventDate "2002.07.26"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. a3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 O-O 6.

e3 h6 7. Bh4 b6 8. Nf3 Bb7 9. Bd3 Nbd7 10. O-O Ne4 11. Bxe7 Qxe7 12. cxd5 exd5

13. Qc2 c5 14. Rac1 Rac8 15. Qa4 a6 16. Rfe1 Bc6 17. Qc2 b5 18. dxc5 Ndxc5 19.

Nxe4 Nxd3 20. Neg5 f6 21. Qxd3 fxg5 22. Nd4 Bb7 23. Qd2 Rc4 24. b3 Rcc8 25. Qb2

g4 26. Rxc8 Rxc8 27. Rc1 Rxc1+ 28. Qxc1 Qd7 29. Qc5 h5 30. Qb6 Kh7 31. Ne6 Qc6

32. Qxc6 Bxc6 33. b4 Bb7 34. Nc5 Bc8 35. f4 gxf3 36. gxf3 g5 37. Kf2 Kg6 38.

Nb3 h4 39. Nd4 Kf6 40. f4 g4 41. Nb3 Kf5 42. Ke2 g3 43. hxg3 h3 44. Kf3 Kg6 45.

Nd4 Bg4+ 46. Kf2 Bd7 47. Nf3 Kf5 48. g4+ Ke4 49. f5 Bxf5 50. Ng5+ Ke5 51. gxf5

1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 8th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Michael Smith II 1617 W9 W13 2.0

2 Sara Herman 1995 W15 W8 2.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W16 W7 2.0

4 Daniel Herman 2056 W10 D5 1.5

5 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W17 D4 1.5

6 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W14 H--- 1.5

7 Paul D Anderson 2032 W11 L3 1.0

8 Mark McGough 1770 W18 L2 1.0

9 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L1 W17 1.0

10 Clinton D Eads 1310 L4 W18 1.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L7 W16 1.0

12 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W15 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L1 0.5

14 Christophe Motley 1541 L6 H--- 0.5

15 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L12 0.0

16 Shirley Herman 1174 L3 L11 0.0

17 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L5 L9 0.0

18 Daniel J Rupp 973 L8 L10 0.0

Extra Credit

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 8, 2018 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Mike Smith II.  This time, the game was created with the help of Joey Arispe at the May Swiss 90 tournament.  Joey started at the Colorado Springs Chess Club in August 2017, and he has almost established a USCF rating.


I guess it takes 26 games to establish a rating with the USCF.  Before that, you are considered provisionally rated.  That means different rules apply to you in regards to calculating your rating and playing in matches.


Joey and Mike have never faced each other before.  It was a close game until Mike deployed his usual "throw-away-any-kind-of-positional-advantage-to-sacrifice-a-piece-for-a-cheap-mate-shot" strategy.  And it worked!


Of course, he missed the mate.


Black to mate



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205058797


Extra Credit

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112632


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.01"]

[Round "1.9"]

[White "Arispe, Joey"]

[Black "Smith, Mike"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A47"]

[WhiteElo "1192"]

[BlackElo "1617"]

[PlyCount "84"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 b6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Nbd2 Be7 5. h3

O-O 6. e3 Nd5 7. Bh2 f5 8. Bd3 Nb4 9. Be2 Bb7 10. a3 Nd5 11. c4 Nf6 12. b4 Ne4

13. Nxe4 fxe4 14. Nd2 Bh4 15. O-O Qf6 16. Bg3 d6 17. Bg4 Bg5 18. Qc2 Qg6 19.

Qb3 h5 20. Bd1 Nd7 21. Bc2 Nf6 22. f3 Bxe3+ 23. Qxe3 Qxg3 24. Nxe4 Bxe4 25.

Bxe4 Rae8 26. Bc6 Re7 27. a4 Nh7 28. Bd5 Ng5 29. Kh1 c6 30. Bxc6 Nxh3 31. a5

Rf4 32. axb6 axb6 33. Ra8+ Kf7 34. Be8+ Kf6 35. Bxh5 g6 36. Bg4 Ng5 37. Rf8+

Nf7 38. c5 Kg7 39. cxd6 Ra7 40. Re8 Ra2 41. Bh3 Rh4 42. Kg1 Rxh3 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 1st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W9 1.0

2 Daniel Herman 2056 W10 1.0

3 Paul D Anderson 2032 W11 1.0

4 Sara Herman 1995 W12 1.0

5 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W13 1.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W14 1.0

7 Mark McGough 1770 W15 1.0

8 Michael Smith II 1617 W16 1.0

9 Christophe Motley 1541 L1 0.0

10 Clinton D Eads 1310 L2 0.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L3 0.0

12 Joey Arispe 1192 L4 0.0

13 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L5 0.0

14 Shirley Herman 1174 L6 0.0

15 Daniel J Rupp 973 L7 0.0

16 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L8 0.0

What's Your Name

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 30, 2018 at 9:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Mike Smith II.  His name is so common that he needs a number to set himself apart.  Mike joined the Colorado Springs Chess Club in 2017 and started with a 1255 rating.  He quickly shot up 400 rating points as he adjusted to tournament chess.  However, he has been up and down ever since.


At the Cabin Fever Reliever, the story stayed the same.


He was supreme in his first two rounds, with 2 wins.  Then he landed on board 1 against NM Buck Buchanan.  He had already beaten Buck in the City Championship last year and had his best shot to earn his inaugural 1st place. 


However, the down side was about to rear its ugly head again.  Mike crashed and burned in the next 2 games, with 2 devastating losses.  It was so bad he talked about changing his name.


Of couse, it is not unusual for chess players to change their name.  Most chess players have done so, at one time or another, for various reasons.  In fact, every player who played in the 2018 Colorado Closed Championship this year had already changed their name.



Colorado Closed, Round 1 - NM Lior Lapid vs CM Kevin Seidler


2018 Colorado Closed Championship


Place, Score, Name, Original Name


1st  4.0  NM Lior Lapid - Lior Smith

2nd 3.5  IM Michael Mulyar - Michael Johnson

2nd 3.5  FM Nikhilesh Kunche - Nikhilesh Williams

4th 2.0  NM Gunnar Andersen - Gunnar Anderson

4th 2.0  LM Richard Shtivelband - Richard Brown

5th 0.0  CM Kevin Seidler - Kevin Jones


So, it is understandable that Mike would want to change his name.  Who would want to be associated with this position.  This is the Jeff Gillooly of chess positions.  Coincidentally, Jeff Gillooly changed his name to Mike Smith III.


Black to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205039746


What's Your Name

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112602


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.04.24"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Smith, Mike"]

[Black "Buchanan, Richard"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C44"]

[WhiteElo "1641"]

[BlackElo "2010"]

[PlyCount "70"]

[EventDate "2018.04.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. c3

d3 6. Qxd3 d6 7. b4 Bb6 8. b5 Nce7 9. Bb3 Nf6 10. Bb2 O-O 11. O-O Ng6 12. c4

Nf4 13. Qd2 Ne6 14. Nc3 Nc5 15. Bc2 Be6 16. Qe2 Re8 17. Rad1 Qc8 18. Ng5 Bg4

19. Nf3 Qe6 20. Rfe1 Ncd7 21. Qd3 Bxf3 22. gxf3 Ne5 23. Qe2 Qh3 24. Rd3 Nxd3

25. Bxd3 Re5 26. Bc1 Ba5 27. Qe3 Rh5 28. Bb1 Qxh2+ 29. Kf1 Qh1+ 30. Ke2 Qg2 31.

c5 Rxc5 32. Bd2 Re8 33. Rf1 Bxc3 34. Bxc3 Nd5 35. Qd3 Nf4+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 24th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45d10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Richard Buchanan 2010 W9 W2 W3 W4 4.0 $26.00 1st

2 Mark McGough 1795 W7 L1 W5 W3 3.0 $17.00 2nd

3 Michael Smith II 1641 W10 W4 L1 L2 2.0

4 Supreme King 1972 W5 L3 W8 L1 2.0

5 Gilber Gaxiola Jr 1317 L4 W10 L2 W7 2.0 $11.00 U1500

6 Paul D Anderson 2039 H--- H--- U--- W10 2.0

7 Ayush Pan Vispute 1179 L2 D9 W10 L5 1.5

8 Larry Turner 1745 W11 H--- L4 U--- 1.5 $5.00 GOW

9 Dean W Brown 1425 L1 D7 U--- U--- 0.5

10 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L3 L5 L7 L6 0.0

11 Grayson Ed Harris 1034 L8 U--- U--- U--- 0.0

One Good Turner Deserves Another

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 23, 2018 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Larry Turner.  Larry is a long-time, Colorado chess player.  His tournament results stretch back into the early nineties and, possibly, even further.  However, he doesn't get to play a lot of games, only racking up 164 regular-rated games since 1991.  In comparison, Dean Brown has 3,257 since 1992.


He does stop by the club when he can and drop off candy and chess books.  He is the chess equivalent of the Easter Bunny.  If all the members of the club have been good over the past year, we get a bag of candy and a new chess book for our library.  If any member has been harassing TDs or bullying other players on social media, we get a glass of straight vinegar.


This year's book has been especially popular.  When all our members showed up on the good list for the second year in a row, Larry brought us The Triangle System by Ruslan Scherbakov.  It has jumped to the top of our hot check-out list!


So, when I ran across this crazy, tactical position in Larry's only game this year, it seemed fitting to return the gesture and award him with the Game Of The Week.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205023516


One Good Turner Deserves Another

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112564


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.04.17"]

[Round "1.4"]

[White "Turner, Larry"]

[Black "Harris, Grayson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E01"]

[WhiteElo "1745"]

[BlackElo "1034"]

[PlyCount "71"]

[EventDate "2018.04.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 c5 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 e6 5. O-O Nf6

6. c4 Bd6 7. Nc3 dxc4 8. Qa4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 O-O 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bxc6 Bd7 12.

Rd1 Qc7 13. Bxd7 Nxd7 14. Nb5 Qb8 15. Nxd6 Nb6 16. Qc2 Nd5 17. Nxc4 Rc8 18. b3

Nb6 19. Bf4 e5 20. Be3 Qc7 21. Bxb6 axb6 22. Rac1 b5 23. Ne3 Qxc2 24. Rxc2 Rxc2

25. Nxc2 f6 26. Nb4 Kf7 27. Rd7+ Kg6 28. Rb7 Rc8 29. Rxb5 Kg5 30. f4+ Kg4 31.

fxe5 Kf5 32. exf6+ Ke4 33. Kf2 Rf8 34. Rb6 gxf6 35. a4 Kd4 36. Nd3 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 17th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45d10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Richard Buchanan 2010 W7 W5 2.0

2 Michael Smith II 1641 W9 W4 2.0

3 Larry Turner 1745 W10 H--- 1.5

4 Supreme King 1972 W6 L2 1.0

5 Mark McGough 1795 W8 L1 1.0

6 Gilber Gaxiola Jr 1317 L4 W9 1.0

7 Dean W Brown 1425 L1 D8 0.5

8 Ayush Pan Vispute 1179 L5 D7 0.5

9 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L2 L6 0.0

10 Grayson Ed Harris 1034 L3 U--- 0.0

Puncher's Chance

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 17, 2018 at 5:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Tim Brennan


Thanks Paul for inviting me back for another Tim Brennan week in the Colorado Springs Chess Newsletter!


Today I would like to share my experience playing in the Colorado vs New Mexico team match last fall.  The Colorado vs New Mexico matches go back a few years, and I believe the idea was started by Paul Covington (although it might have been Klaus Johnson).  Each year the event is hosted by a different state.


Last year (2017), it was held in Santa Fe, which is the capital of New Mexico.  Santa Fe is also home of my favorite author George R. R. Martin who wrote the Game of Thrones books.  GRRM is also a life member of the USCF!


I was the TD for the Colorado vs New Mexico match a few years ago when it was held in Trinidad.  So, I was pretty familiar with the format and knew the event was a lot of fun.  These tournaments are similar to the Scholastic Closed, where there are always last minute drop outs and no shows.


For the 2017 tournament, it was announced that it was going to be held in the capital building, which I thought sounded very exciting.  I love tournaments that are held in nice and exotic locations.


They were holding a side event that was open to everyone.  So, I decided I would drive down to Santa Fe and play in that.  I had done nothing to qualify in the team tournament, and didn't even play in the class championship, which determines who represents Colorado.  As I was driving down that Friday, Brian Wall texted me to let me know that Chris Peterson, who was supposed to play board one, dropped out at the last minute. Brian wanted to know if I could take Chris's place on the team.


Of course, Chris is a much stronger player than I am, but when you are man short you have to take any warm body that you can find!  Much like when the Chicago Blackhawks signed a 36 year old accountant earlier this year to be their backup goalie - and he ended up in the game!


The day of the tournament I ended up on board 2, the "master/expert" board, even though my brief tenure as an "expert" ended faster than a Britney Spears Vegas marriage.  I found out I was paired against Philip Bauer (rated 2102).  Brian sat next to me on board 1.


The event was absolutely beautiful! We sat right in the middle of the capital in a circle under the domed ceiling.  They had flags and nice boards for us to play on.


Round 1, Brian and I both lost, but the team score was 5-5.


After round 1, everyone went out for a nice lunch at a Mexican restaurant which was great.  That night was the Connor McGregor vs Floyd Mayweather fight, which I really wanted to watch.  Most people predicted that Mayweather would win, but McGregor had a "puncher's chance."  I felt the same way going into my second round game.


In round 2, I was able to get my pieces on some active squares, and then my opponent let down his guard and allowed me a sucker punch.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205008223


After the dust settled in round 2, Colorado came out a game ahead and won the match 11-9.  I was happy that I was able to contribute and put Colorado over the top with my 300 point upset win!  That night Brian, Philip (my opponent in the match) and I all watched the McGregor fight, which was a blast!


Thank you to the fine folks in New Mexico who put on such an awesome event! This will be a tournament and weekend I will never forget.


Puncher's Chance

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112502


[Event "NM vs CO"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.08.26"]

[Round "2.2"]

[White "Brennan, Tim"]

[Black "Bauer, Philip"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B18"]

[WhiteElo "1821"]

[BlackElo "2102"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2017.08.26"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Bc4 e6 7. N1e2 Nf6 8.

O-O Nbd7 9. f4 b5 10. Bb3 a5 11. c3 a4 12. Bc2 Bxc2 13. Qxc2 Bd6 14. f5 e5 15.

Bg5 h6 16. Bh4 Qb6 17. Kh1 exd4 18. Nxd4 O-O 19. Ne4 Nxe4 20. Qxe4 c5 21. Nf3

Rfe8 22. Qg4 Re2 23. f6 Nxf6 24. Bxf6 Bf8 25. Bh4 Rae8 26. Rae1 c4 27. a3 R8e6

28. Nd4 Rxe1 29. Rxe1 Rg6 30. Qc8 Qa6 31. Qxa6 Rxa6 32. Re8 g5 33. Bg3 f6 34.

Re6 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 10th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Peter Barlay 1617 W8 L3 D11 W6 W2 W4 4.5 $36.00 1st

2 Mark McGough 1648 W6 W4 W7 W3 L1 L5 4.0 $6.00 2nd

3 Paul D Anderson 1930 W11 W1 W5 L2 L4 W6 4.0 $6.00 2nd

4 Michael Smith II 1508 W12 L2 W10 W5 W3 L1 4.0 $6.00 2nd

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1643 W13 W10 L3 L4 W7 W2 4.0 $6.00 2nd

6 Scott Ch Williams 1294 L2 W12 W13 L1 W10 L3 3.0 $8.00 U1500

7 Supreme King 1889 L10 W13 L2 W8 L5 W12 3.0

8 Grayson Ed Harris 1011 L1 L11 W12 L7 W13 W10 3.0 $8.00 U1500

9 Joey Arispe 1208 H--- U--- U--- L10 W12 W13 2.5

10 Dean W Brown 1409 W7 L5 L4 W9 L6 L8 2.0

11 William Leo Wolf 1477 L3 W8 D1 U--- U--- U--- 1.5

12 Lawrence R Osborn 986 L4 L6 L8 W13 L9 L7 1.0

13 Clinton D Eads 1052 L5 L7 L6 L12 L8 L9 0.0

D Is For Discovery VI

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 10, 2018 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics. It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery.


Discovery is a chess move that attacks with two pieces.


The Discovery is played when a player is going to make an attack with the piece that he moves, but also he will make an attack with another piece that was blocked by the piece that he moves.  When the Discovery is successful, the opponent can only avoid one of the attacks.  This means that the other attack will gain material or mate.   The second attack is often a check on the King, which is called a Discovered Check.


"Discovered check is the dive bomber of the Chessboard."

(Reuben Fine)


Here is a position from a game played between Larry Osborn and  Ayush "Panda" Vispute in the March Swiss 90 from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night monthly tournament.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204991018


The Discovery is played by moving the Rook to c1.  This move is an attack on the White King, the Discovered Check.  White has to move the King.  However, when the Discovery is added into the mix, the attack is unstoppable.  The Rook move reveals an attack on the White Bishop.


The first attack is a check of the King.  The second attack is a capture of the Bishop. White has to defend the King by the rules of the game.  The Bishop has been lost along with the hopes of winning a close endgame.


So, by just being observent, a player can find these Discovery opportunities and save that point.


D Is For Discovery VI

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112459

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.20"]

[Round "3.7"]

[White "Osborn, Larry"]

[Black "Vispute, Ayush"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D30"]

[WhiteElo "974"]

[BlackElo "1209"]

[PlyCount "78"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Nf3 b6

6. g3 Bb7 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Nbd2 Nbd7 10. Re1 a6 11. Ng5 b5 12. b3 h6

13. Ngf3 Nb6 14. Ne5 g5 15. dxc5 Nxc4 16. Nexc4 gxf4 17. Nb6 fxe3 18. Rxe3 Bxc5

19. Nxa8 Bxe3 20. fxe3 Qxa8 21. Qf3 Ne4 22. Qg4+ Kh7 23. Nxe4 f5 24. Nf6+ Rxf6

25. Qd4 Rg6 26. Rc1 Rg7 27. Qe5 Re7 28. Qf6 Qe8 29. Qh4 Rg7 30. Bf3 Qe7 31. Qd4

e5 32. Qb6 Rg6 33. Rc7 Rxb6 34. Rxe7+ Kg6 35. Rxe5 Kf6 36. Re8 Rc6 37. Bxd5

Rc1+ 38. Kf2 Bxd5 39. h4 Rc2+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 3rd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 1648 W5 W4 W10 3.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1930 W7 W6 W3 3.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1643 W11 W8 L2 2.0

4 Michael Smith II 1508 W12 L1 W8 2.0

5 Scott Ch Williams 1294 L1 W12 W11 2.0

6 Peter Barlay 1617 W9 L2 D7 1.5

7 William Leo Wolf 1477 L2 W9 D6 1.5

8 Dean W Brown 1409 W10 L3 L4 1.0

9 Grayson Ed Harris 1011 L6 L7 W12 1.0

10 Supreme King 1889 L8 W11 L1 1.0

11 Clinton D Eads 1052 L3 L10 L5 0.0

12 Lawrence R Osborn 986 L4 L5 L9 0.0

A Time Of Testing

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 3, 2018 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's March Swiss 90 tournament.  It was unusual in that I was not a tournament director (TD) in any way for this event.  My TD certification had expired.  Fortunately, we have a number of authorized TDs for the club, and Peter Barlay stepped in as Chief TD.


It is hard to believe it has been 3 years since I became a TD to help save the Colorado Springs Chess Club on Tuesday nights.  The USCF gives you 3 years before your certification expires.  However, they don't do much else.  I didn't get an email reminder that my time was up.  I didn't get a letter in the mail saying, "Thanks for your service!  We want you back.  Here is how to renew."  Nothing.  They just lock you out of the TD website.


The rule book mentions that a test is required after 3 years to continue being a TD.  However, it doesn't say much else.  I wasn't told when to take the test.  I wasn't told where to take the test.  Nothing.  They just lock you out of the TD website.


Well, I had to do a little digging, but I found where to get the test.  It is funny because I also have to take a test to continue my insurance license and they both are due in April.  It will be a month of tests and taxes.  How fun!


Of course, I was surprised to see that the government does a better job than the USCF does in helping you take their tests.  Although the government is just as bad in regards to helping you with taxes.  I ordered my tax forms in January and just got them in March.  I guess that is the difference between State and Federal.


Anyway, this tournament needed a TD ruling.  So, Peter jumped in to give his certified opinion.  On move 26, Chris played Bh6, jumping over a Pawn in the process.  Peter awarded Mike 2 minutes for Chris' infraction.  Mike declined the time, and the game resumed.  Peter was worried about the fact that he did not tell Chris that touch move still applies.


He came to me for my uncertified opinion.  I tend to be a laissez-faire TD and told him to wait until the players make another request for a ruling.  They never did.  Luckily, the player, who made the illegal move, moved the touched piece legally and went on to win.  However, he did miss this mating line.


White to mate


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204974973


A Time Of Testing

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112429


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.27"]

[Round "4.4"]

[White "Motley, Chris"]

[Black "Smith, Mike"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B10"]

[WhiteElo "1556"]

[BlackElo "1644"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 d4 4. Ne2 c5 5. c3 Nc6

6. cxd4 cxd4 7. Qa4 Bd7 8. Nexd4 e5 9. Nxc6 Bxc6 10. Bb5 Bd6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12.

Qxc6+ Kf8 13. O-O Ne7 14. Qa4 h5 15. d4 Ng6 16. dxe5 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Bxe5 18. Rd1

Qh4 19. g3 Qg4 20. f4 h4 21. Rd5 hxg3 22. Qa3+ Bd6 23. Qxg3 Bc5+ 24. Rxc5 Qd1+

25. Kf2 Qh1 26. Bd2 Qxa1 27. Bc3 Rh7 28. Rg5 g6 29. f5 Qh1 30. Bb4+ Kg7 31.

Rxg6+ fxg6 32. Qxg6+ Kh8 33. Bc3+ Rg7 34. Qxg7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 27th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90

# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2353 H--- W8 W6 W2 3.5 $44.00 1st

2 Paul D Anderson 2045 W14 D3 W5 L1 2.5 $10.00 2nd

3 Calvin P Dejong 1837 W16 D2 W15 U--- 2.5 $10.00 2nd

4 Edward D Boldt 1836 H--- L11 W13 W6 2.5 $10.00 2nd

5 Michael St Filppu 1654 W20 H--- L2 W7 2.5 $19.00 U1800

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1854 W7 W15 L1 L4 2.0

7 Scott Ch Williams 1203 L6 W20 W16 L5 2.0 $13.00 U1205

8 Dean W Brown 1422 W21 L1 U--- W13 2.0

9 Christophe Motley 1556 H--- H--- U--- W10 2.0 $5.00 GOW

10 Michael Smith II 1644 H--- L12 W14 L9 1.5 $5.00 GOW

11 Daniel Herman 2107 H--- W4 U--- U--- 1.5

12 Sara Herman 1942 H--- W10 U--- U--- 1.5

13 Joey Arispe 1123 L15 W17 L4 L8 1.0 $5.00 GOW

14 Clinton D Eads 1250 L2 L19 L10 W20 1.0

15 Mark McGough 1804 W13 L6 L3 U--- 1.0

16 Joseph Reininger 1193 L3 W21 L7 U--- 1.0

17 Ayush Pan Vispute 1209 L18 L13 W21 U--- 1.0

18 Peter Barlay 1925 W17 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

19 Shirley Herman 1115 U--- W14 U--- U--- 1.0

20 Grayson Ed Harris 1002 L5 L7 U--- L14 0.0

21 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L8 L16 L17 U--- 0.0


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