Colorado Springs Chess News

The Knights Are Better Here!

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My name is Paul Anderson (http://www.facebook.com/paul.anderson.904750), and I began the newsletter on March 1, 2004 as a way for me to receive and distribute any last minute schedule changes about local chess events and to put to use the analysis and publishing features of my Fritz 8.

However, I soon realized that I liked reporting on the results of my local club and adding some humorous comments about the games I was publishing.  So, during my chess season (typically February to August) the newsletter will contain at least a couple of articles from me (This Week In Chess and Game Of The Week). 

Every now and then, I will receive chess news, chess games, or other chess stuff from my readers, which I am more than happy to include, as I think it makes for a better newsletter.  It doesn’t matter where you are from or what the news is about (as long as it is about chess); you are welcome to contribute.

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The Millchessial

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 24, 2019 at 6:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


I have played 1000 USCF-rated games.


I knew the milestone was approaching and figured that I would publish the game.  However, there is a gap of time between when I record my game for my TD database and when I move it to my USCF database.  Due to this gap, I didn't notice that I had played 1000 games when I published it, just because I liked the ending.


https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/46752950-the-end-of-a-thing


It was fitting that my 1000th game was against my most common opponent, Mark McGough.  He is a big fan of my newsletter and is always impressed that I can tie any chess game to a verse in the Bible.  I asked him what is his favorite verse.


Which yet my soul seeketh, but I find not: one man among a thousand have I found; but a woman among all those have I not found.

Ecclesiastes 7:28 (KJV)


And since he suffered through having his endgame loss published as my actual 1000th game, I will reward him with getting his endgame win published to commemorate my pseudo-Millennial game, the Millchessial!


Event, Paul Anderson’s Lexicon Of Chess Holidays


5 years = Quinquennial

50 games = Semicenchessial

150 games = Sesquicenchessial

500 games = Quincenchessial

1000 games = Millchessial


Database of 1000 USCF-rated Games

(Rank, Name, Initial Rating, Wins/Games)


1 Anderson,Paul 1614 687.5/1000

2 Buchanan,Buck 2101 20.0/37 - MOST VICTORIES

3 McGough,Mark 1821 14.5/53 - MOST COMMON OPPONENT

4 Fox,Jeff 1874 13.5/32

5 Bloomer,Josh 2068 12.5/17

6 Wall,Brian 2214 9.0/11

7 Rountree,Brian 1781 8.5/45

8 Carson,Anthea 1477 8.0/33

9 Anderson,Renard 2242 7.0/7 -  REGULAR OWEN ALERT

10 Rea,Andy 2079 7.0/7 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

11 Freeman,Alex 1580 7.0/27

12 Herman,Daniel 1429 7.0/25

13 Brown,Dean 1442 7.0/47

14 Billaux,Eric 2136 4.5/5

15 Barlay,Imre 1997 4.0/7

16 Kondracki,Kurt 1882 4.0/7

17 MacMillan,Shaun 2005 4.0/5

18 Avery,Dan 2014 4.0/4 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

19 McGuire,Virgil 1710 3.5/8

20 Hughes,Tyler 2126 3.5/4

21 Seidler,Kevin 1828 3.5/4

22 DeJong,Calvin 1241 3.0/10

23 Langseth,Rhett 1764 3.0/9

24 Petters,Markus 2037 3.0/4

25 Wutt,Larry 1226 3.0/4

26 Canney,Randy 2225 3.0/3

27 Weissbarth,Adam 2088 3.0/3

28 Arizpe,Frank 1728 3.0/3

29 Cabrera,Dan 1391 3.0/3

30 Bozhenov,Alex 1908 2.5/8

31 Langseth,DuWayne 1824 2.5/4

32 Friedman,Joe 2215 2.5/3

33 Loving,Jason 1794 2.0/7

34 Wise,Katie 1273 2.0/7

35 Evans,Julian 1905 2.0/5

36 Wikle,Earle 1920 2.0/4

37 Cacas,Alex 1800 2.0/4

38 Bihlmeyer,Joe 1800 2.0/3

39 Check,Jason 1655 2.0/3

40 Malone,Zack 1513 2.0/3

41 Ramirez,Robert 1345 2.0/3

42 Ponomarev,Mikhail 2200 2.0/2

43 Pedry,John 1781 2.0/2

44 Farrington,Jack 1507 2.0/2

45 Mensay,Nathan 1400 2.0/2

46 Martinez,Isaac 1666 1.5/10

47 Covington,Paul 1906 1.5/8

48 Bridle,Sam 1854 1.5/4

49 Kuiper,Mike 1655 1.5/4

50 Caldwell,Jason 1987 1.5/3

51 Baffo,Jeffrey 1899 1.5/3

52 Andersen,Gunnar 1786 1.5/3

53 Earlewine,Brad 1648 1.5/3

54 Baughman,Chris 1768 1.5/2

55 Hester,Jesse 1563 1.5/2

56 Pahk,Joe 1249 1.5/17

57 Powers,James 1608 1.0/6

58 Sunderland,Gerry 1354 1.0/6

59 Meliti,David 1790 1.0/5

60 Barlay,Peter 1706 1.0/5

61 Torres,Alejandro 1653 1.0/5

62 Doykos,Ted 1458 1.0/5

63 Whinemiller 1713 1.0/4

64 Brennan,Timothy 1687 1.0/4

65 Divine,Josh 1618 1.0/4

66 Turner,Larry 1791 1.0/3

67 Gitis,Alexander 1995 1.0/2

68 Anderson,Mitch 1991 1.0/2

69 Serna,Jeffrey 1757 1.0/2

70 Johnston,Jim 1753 1.0/2

71 Lasley,Alexa 1548 1.0/2

72 St. John,Daniel 1543 1.0/2

73 Gilchrist,Jeff 1532 1.0/2

74 Myers,Jordan 1525 1.0/2

75 Sabean,Steven 1385 1.0/2

76 Cabrera,Sean 1354 1.0/2

77 Fortune,Jon 1315 1.0/2

78 Chandler,William 1266 1.0/2

79 Sharavdorj,Dashzegve 2480 1.0/1

80 McCarty,James 2315 1.0/1

81 Mo,Sage 2230 1.0/1

82 Karagianis,Pete 2200 1.0/1

83 Fordon,Robert 2196 1.0/1

84 Kaufman,Arthur 2142 1.0/1

85 Genz,Geoffrey 2129 1.0/1

86 Peterson,Chris 2120 1.0/1

87 Hamblin,James 2119 1.0/1

88 Tedla,Shravan 2093 1.0/1

89 Duesing,Tim 2084 1.0/1

90 Gaschler,Shane 2022 1.0/1

91 Shedd,Mike 2014 1.0/1

92 Sharnopolskiy,Yefim 2006 1.0/1

93 Herbst,Richard 2000 1.0/1

94 Samuels,Joshua 1990 1.0/1

95 Irwin,John 1990 1.0/1

96 Simond,Roger 1934 1.0/1

97 Morrow,Hans 1920 1.0/1

98 Ola,Nathaniel 1899 1.0/1

99 Clevenger,Chris 1848 1.0/1

100 Figlio,Gino 1769 1.0/1

101 Maynes,Jack 1766 1.0/1

102 Christie,Kyle 1763 1.0/1

103 Bhavikatti,Neil 1760 1.0/1

104 Steadman,Gregg 1743 1.0/1

105 Wheatley,Guy 1736 1.0/1

106 McKenna,James 1730 1.0/1

107 Mendoza,Aldo 1726 1.0/1

108 Pinedo,Javier 1710 1.0/1

109 Kern,Wolfgang 1704 1.0/1

110 Zax,Jacob 1674 1.0/1

111 Greenup,Randall 1628 1.0/1

112 Hoak,Don 1598 1.0/1

113 Kornienko,Alexander 1588 1.0/1

114 Abresch,Martin 1561 1.0/1

115 Torres,Michael 1559 1.0/1

116 Groves,Sean 1544 1.0/1

117 Hughes,Brian 1519 1.0/1

118 Al-Mutlaq,Omar 1501 1.0/1

119 Sohn,Inn 1431 1.0/1

120 Heath,Roy 1364 1.0/1

121 Lewis,Dain 1360 1.0/1

122 Naszodi,Laszlo 1295 1.0/1

123 Timmons,Tiffany 1278 1.0/1

124 Hagstrom,George 1261 1.0/1

125 Davies,Ann 1211 1.0/1

126 Mekonnen,Alex 1576 0.5/7

127 Cordovano,Richard 1554 0.5/7

128 Lucas,Gene 1502 0.5/5

129 Fox,Shannon 1738 0.5/3

130 Fromme,Joe 1647 0.5/3

131 Fisher,Timothy 1562 0.5/3

132 Grimm,Paul 1353 0.5/3

133 Williams,Jesse 1260 0.5/3

134 Vispute,Ayush 1098 0.5/3

135 Flores,John 1805 0.5/2

136 Martinson,Timothy 1760 0.5/2

137 Smith,Victor 1747 0.5/2

138 Neri,Gerardo 1743 0.5/2

139 Bagstad,Gary 1700 0.5/2

140 Deloslado,Edelreich 1697 0.5/2

141 MacNeil,JC 1638 0.5/2

142 Kass,Michael 1604 0.5/2

143 Motley,Chris 1575 0.5/2

144 Bartlow,Justin 1414 0.5/2

145 Tucker,Matthew 1217 0.5/2

146 Csima,Jeffrey 2018 0.5/1

147 Kulbacki,James 1932 0.5/1

148 Aandahl,Vance 1809 0.5/1

149 Szaloky,Zoltan 1781 0.5/1

150 Labencki,Mark 1760 0.5/1

151 Nguyen,Vinh 1591 0.5/1

152 Haines,Joseph 1564 0.5/1

153 Bourie,Tom 1563 0.5/1

154 Moore,Randall 1531 0.5/1

155 Kovach,Stephen 1412 0.5/1

156 Harris,Grayson 1402 0.5/1

157 Snavely,Josh 1363 0.5/1

158 Katona,John 1361 0.5/1

159 Chase,Zachary 1302 0.5/1

160 Bonifate,Gregory 1251 0.5/1

161 Ufer,Allan 1048 0.0/10 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

162 Brown,Richard 1469 0.0/7 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

163 Eads,Clint 1231 0.0/7 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

164 Smith,Mike 1545 0.0/6 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

165 Spell,Fred Eric 1203 0.0/6 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

166 Shotwell,Frank 1081 0.0/6 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

167 Filppu,Mike 1312 0.0/5 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

168 Sparks,Steve 1227 0.0/4 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

169 Delaware,Renae 1125 0.0/4 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

170 Williams,Scott 1120 0.0/4 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

171 O'Dell,Ray 1111 0.0/4 - REGULAR OWEN ALERT

172 Telinbacco,Anthony 1909 0.0/3

173 Krowczyk,Mark 1819 0.0/3

174 Santiago,Roderick 1632 0.0/3

175 Reynolds,Randy 1594 0.0/3

176 Shook,Spencer 1574 0.0/3

177 Corbett,Tom 1516 0.0/3

178 Herman,Becca 1428 0.0/3

179 Martin,Charles 1402 0.0/3

180 Herman,Sara 1284 0.0/3

181 Foster,Cory 1222 0.0/3

182 Frenzel,Gary 1075 0.0/3

183 Kaaoush,Kevin 1049 0.0/3

184 Meyer,Sam 968 0.0/3

185 Arispe,Joey 912 0.0/3

186 Hortillosa,Andy 1939 0.0/2

187 Miller,Glenn 1795 0.0/2

188 Del Conte,Koji 1791 0.0/2

189 Hornyak,Istvan 1705 0.0/2

190 Myers,Justice 1650 0.0/2

191 Anderson,Robert 1587 0.0/2

192 Walo,Max 1489 0.0/2

193 Short,Peter 1484 0.0/2

194 Stark,Nathan 1468 0.0/2

195 Robb,Morgan 1459 0.0/2

196 Aragon,Joseph 1413 0.0/2

197 Swan,Peter 1377 0.0/2

198 Inman,Ross 1367 0.0/2

199 Garcia,William 1332 0.0/2

200 Wolf,Will 1316 0.0/2

201 Feller,David 1304 0.0/2

202 Eskeldson,Derek 1270 0.0/2

203 Toth,Mike 1122 0.0/2

204 Brunn,John 1113 0.0/2

205 Pahk,Eugin 1079 0.0/2

206 Gibbs,Dale 1073 0.0/2

207 Mullikin,Tom 1070 0.0/2

208 Osborn,Larry 905 0.0/2

209 Schneider,Kathy 700 0.0/2

210 Hartsook,David 2077 0.0/1

211 Jex,Joshua 2005 0.0/1

212 Zupa,Daoud 1973 0.0/1

213 Glassman,Arthur 1912 0.0/1

214 Alexander,Charles 1863 0.0/1

215 Jablon,Stephen 1784 0.0/1

216 Massey,Scott 1783 0.0/1

217 Leotaud,Glen 1755 0.0/1

218 Johnson,Debra 1753 0.0/1

219 Laganiere,James 1738 0.0/1

220 Terrell,Darryl 1735 0.0/1

221 Perry,Silas 1733 0.0/1

222 Sbarge,Reuben 1728 0.0/1

223 Hoffacker,Dan 1699 0.0/1

224 McAdam,Mark 1683 0.0/1

225 Coker,Laurence 1678 0.0/1

226 Chen,Jackson 1672 0.0/1

227 Llacza,Jose 1667 0.0/1

228 Ohnmacht,Michael 1650 0.0/1

229 Vispute,Atharva 1647 0.0/1

230 Montgomery,Brad 1645 0.0/1

231 Wall,Chris 1637 0.0/1

232 Thigpen,Douglas 1610 0.0/1

233 Brown,Phil 1604 0.0/1

234 Hanagan,Christopher 1600 0.0/1

235 Stoneking,Jason 1593 0.0/1

236 Kohler,Robert 1588 0.0/1

237 Grigg,Peter 1586 0.0/1

238 Benedek,William 1585 0.0/1

239 Dail,Ken 1580 0.0/1

240 Wolf,William 1559 0.0/1

241 Weissbarth,Daniel 1546 0.0/1

242 Silva,David 1544 0.0/1

243 Matthews,Ben 1537 0.0/1

244 Schultz,John 1530 0.0/1

245 Galla,Chris 1526 0.0/1

246 Wright,Steve 1514 0.0/1

247 Majid,Kahhak 1504 0.0/1

248 Chow,Andrew 1492 0.0/1

249 Boyce,Bongee 1489 0.0/1

250 Kovats,Jiri 1462 0.0/1

251 Cruz,Rodney 1443 0.0/1

252 Mitchell,Dean 1441 0.0/1

253 King,John 1438 0.0/1

254 Coyle,William 1432 0.0/1

255 Staten,Bob 1423 0.0/1

256 Southard,Dan 1401 0.0/1

257 Moritz,David 1395 0.0/1

258 Guthrie,Scott 1389 0.0/1

259 Galler,Sam 1385 0.0/1

260 Blain,Blaise 1380 0.0/1

261 Lucas,Joice 1374 0.0/1

262 MacRae,Ken 1346 0.0/1

263 Madsen,Mike 1336 0.0/1

264 Nichols,Tikila 1332 0.0/1

265 Isacoff,Robert 1327 0.0/1

266 Groves,Dan 1325 0.0/1

267 Mayer,Scott 1319 0.0/1

268 Hansen,Matthew 1317 0.0/1

269 McNairy,Webster 1301 0.0/1

270 Nastri,John 1300 0.0/1

271 Conforti,Larry 1300 0.0/1

272 Mason,Suliman 1300 0.0/1

273 Buring,Alan 1295 0.0/1

274 Szymanski,Donna 1285 0.0/1

275 Maier,Jerry 1254 0.0/1

276 Davis,Boris 1245 0.0/1

277 Scott,Elizabeth 1243 0.0/1

278 Harris,Edward 1234 0.0/1

279 Bracht,Stephen 1229 0.0/1

280 Bram,Pret 1190 0.0/1

281 Nickelson,Leroi 1188 0.0/1

282 Miller,Joshua 1154 0.0/1

283 Timmons,Teanna 1145 0.0/1

284 Nica,Adrian 1140 0.0/1

285 Artis,Ray 1131 0.0/1

286 Schneider,Charles 1129 0.0/1

287 Kesler,Corey 1129 0.0/1

288 Chase,Tyler 1116 0.0/1

289 Hathorn,Larry 1111 0.0/1

290 Umana,Zach 1108 0.0/1

291 Santucci,Bernie 1097 0.0/1

292 Smythe,Steve 1097 0.0/1

293 Mihalas,Mike 1092 0.0/1

294 Hawthorn,Larry 1091 0.0/1

295 Dimiduk,Jeffrey 1089 0.0/1

296 Prutz,Dan 1059 0.0/1

297 Novik,Elena 1053 0.0/1

298 Kiechlin,Jack 1053 0.0/1

299 Richardson,Tom 1048 0.0/1

300 Sills,Scott 1048 0.0/1

301 Wheeler,William 1039 0.0/1

302 Hope,Frederick 1035 0.0/1

303 Barr,Robert 1021 0.0/1

304 McEnany,Rian 1004 0.0/1

305 Capen,Tony 980 0.0/1

306 Schiaffino,Riccardo 974 0.0/1

307 Dais,Ayman 969 0.0/1

308 Castle,Bryan 966 0.0/1

309 Rupp,Dan 965 0.0/1

310 Williams,Selah 944 0.0/1

311 Derbyshire,Sanjay 938 0.0/1

312 Kidd,Nathan 882 0.0/1

313 Veitch,James 880 0.0/1

314 Herbst,Robbie 873 0.0/1

315 Crose,Kendel Boyd 867 0.0/1

316 Rice,Sarah 842 0.0/1

317 Joy,Thomas 820 0.0/1

318 Beasley,Charles 742 0.0/1

319 Clark,Doug 379 0.0/1


Black to mate in 3


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205780361


The Millchessial

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114442


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.06.18"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Arispe, Joey"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A45"]

[WhiteElo "1259"]

[BlackElo "1857"]

[PlyCount "152"]

[EventDate "2019.06.04"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. Bf4 d5 4. Nf3 Bd6 5. Bxd6

Qxd6 6. e3 Bd7 7. Be2 O-O 8. O-O Bc6 9. Re1 Nbd7 10. Qd3 a6 11. Rad1 e5 12.

Nxe5 Nxe5 13. dxe5 Qxe5 14. Qd4 Rfe8 15. Qxe5 Rxe5 16. Rd4 Ne4 17. Nxe4 dxe4

18. Red1 h6 19. h3 Rae8 20. Kh2 g6 21. g3 Kg7 22. Rd8 Rxd8 23. Rxd8 Rd5 24.

Rxd5 Bxd5 25. a3 a5 26. b4 axb4 27. axb4 Kf6 28. g4 Ke5 29. Kg3 f6 30. h4 g5

31. hxg5 hxg5 32. c4 Be6 33. f3 b6 34. Kf2 Bd7 35. b5 Be6 36. Kg3 Bc8 37. Kf2

Bb7 38. Kg3 exf3 39. Bxf3 Be4 40. Kf2 Bd3 41. Bd5 Kd6 42. Kf3 Kc5 43. Be6 Bxc4

44. Bxc4 Kxc4 45. Ke4 Kxb5 46. Kf5 c5 47. Kxf6 c4 48. e4 c3 49. e5 c2 50. e6

c1=Q 51. e7 Qf4+ 52. Kg7 Qe5+ 53. Kf7 Qd5+ 54. Kf8 Qd6 55. Kf7 Qf4+ 56. Kg6

Qe4+ 57. Kf7 Qh7+ 58. Kf8 Qh8+ 59. Kf7 Kc5 60. e8=Q Qxe8+ 61. Kxe8 b5 62. Kf7

b4 63. Kf6 Kd6 64. Kxg5 b3 65. Kf6 b2 66. g5 b1=Q 67. g6 Qf1+ 68. Kg7 Ke7 69.

Kh7 Qh3+ 70. Kg7 Ke8 71. Kg8 Qe6+ 72. Kh7 Qf5 73. Kg7 Qf8+ 74. Kh7 Qf5 75. Kg7

Qh5 76. Kf6 Kf8 0-1


This Week In Chess


On June 18th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1950 W5 W3 W2 3.0

2 Christophe Motley 1679 W6 W5 L1 2.0

3 Mark McGough 1857 W10 L1 W4 2.0

4 Joey Arispe 1259 W11 H--- L3 1.5

5 Grayson Ed Harris 1534 L1 L2 W9 1.0

6 Richard Buchanan 2000 L2 W13 U--- 1.0

7 William Leo Wolf 1300 U--- W12 U--- 1.0

8 Peter Barlay 1906 W9 U--- U--- 1.0

9 Dean W Brown 1460 L8 D10 L5 0.5

10 Kenneth Macrae 1264 L3 D9 U--- 0.5

11 Michael Smith II 1713 L4 H--- U--- 0.5

12 Joy Sato unr. U--- L7 U--- 0.0

13 Joseph Griffin 761 U--- L6 U--- 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $30; 2nd $20; U1600/unr $13

Final Nail

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 19, 2019 at 6:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


All good things come to an end.


My Father's Day tradition for the Colorado Springs Chess News website has been to publish a win from my dad during our email match together.  We started playing in 1996, before I ever went to the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  We finished the match after 53 games in 2010.


The match was even (+12-12=9) after this game in 2003.  However, it was also the final nail in the coffin for my dad.  He had purchased Fritz 8 for me as a Christmas gift.  Now, I had a tool to go over my games.  After this point, I won ten of the last twenty games (+10-3=7) to pull ahead in the match.


Going over your own chess games is key to improvement at chess.


I was reminded of this fact recently when I stopped by the Denver Open in April.  One of the invited masters was IM Danny Rensch, who was doing a lecture and simul the night I was there.  I caught part of his lecture where he talked about how to go over your games.  He stressed turning off the computer and finding three key moments on your own.


Of course, I didn't catch the lesson perfectly, as it is never easy to retain 100% when you are not taking notes or expecting to stay for the whole lecture.  I was only in Denver to meet with family and unprepared to catch some pearls of chess wisdom.


The disciple is not above his master: but every one that is perfect shall be as his master.

Luke 6:40 (KJV)


However, here is what I gleaned from IM Daniel Rensch's 3 Point System for analyzing games without a computer.  You are to find the moves where these main elements occurred:


  1. Out of Book
  2. Turning Point
  3. Final Nail


Since this game is also the final nail in the coffin of publishing wins for my dad and doesn't have a good tactical moment, I thought I would apply the 3 Point System to this game.


First, finding the point I got out of book was pretty easy.  I had just discovered LM Brian Wall's emails and the Fishing Pole was all the rage.  Of course, some might say the Fishing Pole move was also the final nail in the coffin of winning this game.


Second, the turning point was harder to choose.  I clearly missed the explanation of this item during the lecture.


Third, the final nail is that moment when the final result is set in stone.  If you play on, you are just hoping for a miracle.  It is that time when the masters say, "The rest is technique."  Here is the position I chose for this game.  Black has given up all hope for a win, but might have one last shot at a draw.  I didn't play the move.  You just have to find a better move than 36...Rf8.


I will let you be the judge on how well I found the 3 points.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205770725


Final Nail

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114430


[Event "12-12-9"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2003.10.31"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C65"]

[PlyCount "115"]

[EventDate "2003.08.16"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Ng4 5. h3 h5 6.

d3 Bc5 7. Bg5 f6 8. Bh4 g5 9. Bg3 h4 10. Bxh4 gxh4 11. hxg4 Qe7 12. Nc3 a6 13.

Ba4 Qg7 14. Nd5 Kd8 15. Nh2 d6 16. Kh1 h3 17. g3 b5 18. Bb3 Na5 19. f3 Nxb3 20.

axb3 Bb7 21. b4 Bd4 22. c3 Bxd5 23. cxd4 Bb7 24. d5 f5 25. Qe2 fxg4 26. fxg4

Ke7 27. Rac1 Kd7 28. Rf5 Raf8 29. Qe3 Rhg8 30. Rcf1 Rxf5 31. Rxf5 Kd8 32. Rh5

Kc8 33. Rxh3 Kb8 34. Kg2 Rf8 35. g5 Rf7 36. Rh6 Rf8 37. Ng4 Rg8 38. Nf6 Qxg5

39. Qxg5 Rxg5 40. Kh3 Rg7 41. Kh4 Ka7 42. g4 Bc8 43. g5 Kb6 44. Rh8 Bh3 45. Ne8

Rxg5 46. Kxg5 Bf1 47. Rh7 Bxd3 48. Nxc7 a5 49. Na8+ Ka6 50. Kf5 a4 51. Rd7 a3

52. Rxd6+ Kb7 53. bxa3 Kxa8 54. Rc6 Kb7 55. Rc5 Kb6 56. d6 Bf1 57. Kxe5 Bh3 58.

Kf6 1-0


This Week In Chess


On June 11th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1950 W11 W4 2.0

2 Christophe Motley 1679 W5 W11 2.0

3 Joey Arispe 1259 W10 H--- 1.5

4 Mark McGough 1857 W9 L1 1.0

5 Richard Buchanan 2000 L2 W13 1.0

6 Peter Barlay 1906 W8 U--- 1.0

7 William Leo Wolf 1300 U--- W12 1.0

8 Dean W Brown 1460 L6 D9 0.5

9 Kenneth Macrae 1264 L4 D8 0.5

10 Michael Smith II 1713 L3 H--- 0.5

11 Grayson Ed Harris 1534 L1 L2 0.0

12 Joy Sato unr. U--- L7 0.0

13 Joseph Griffin 761 U--- L5 0.0

Overworked & Underpaid

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 9, 2019 at 4:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's June Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30) event.  This tournament is a month-long event with one game per week.  I like the one-game-per-week format because it is easier to direct and play.  Not easy, just easier, but I prefer playing.  I do not prefer being the tournament director (TD). 


Being a TD is a thankless job.  There is no fame.  There is no fortune.  It is just work, but I do want to keep the club going.  I feel like the Godfather.


"Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in."

Michael Corleone, The Godfather Part III


I can get most of the directing duties done at the beginning of the night and eventually focus on playing chess.  Well, at least, that is my hope.


Since this was the first Tuesday in June, it was round one.  I am always hopeful that my round one pairing will be an easy game because the first week of a tournament is more hectic as the TD.  It was not.


I was playing Grayson Harris again.  We met in the 4th round of the May Swiss 90, where he got behind in the opening, fought hard, and couldn't quite come back.  This time, it was my turn to fall behind and see if I could come back.  I used up a lot of time trying to figure out a plan to get my Pawn back.


Just when I thought I was won, Grayson pulled out Qa5.


Now, I was low on time and fighting to hold the draw.  When I reached this position, I wasn't thinking tactically and missed the killer move.  However, I held the draw as long as I could, and, with a minute left, I took a shot.


Just when I thought I was drawn, I pulled out a win.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205755011


Overworked & Underpaid

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114401


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.06.04"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Harris, Grayson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D10"]

[WhiteElo "1950"]

[BlackElo "1534"]

[PlyCount "103"]

[EventDate "2019.06.04"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. g3 dxc4 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. Nf3

Bf5 6. O-O Nbd7 7. Nbd2 Nb6 8. Nh4 Bg4 9. h3 Bh5 10. g4 Bg6 11. Nxg6 hxg6 12.

e3 Qc7 13. Qf3 e5 14. Ne4 Be7 15. Bd2 exd4 16. exd4 Nbd5 17. Rfe1 O-O 18. Rac1

b5 19. Nc3 Rad8 20. Re2 Rfe8 21. Rce1 a6 22. Bg5 Kf8 23. Re5 Rd7 24. Bxf6 gxf6

25. Nxd5 cxd5 26. Rxd5 Rxd5 27. Qxd5 Qa5 28. Qe4 Qxa2 29. Re2 c3 30. bxc3 Qa1+

31. Bf1 Qxc3 32. Qb7 Qc8 33. Qa7 Qa8 34. Qxa8 Rxa8 35. Ra2 a5 36. Bxb5 Bb4 37.

d5 Ke7 38. Kg2 Kd6 39. Bc6 Ra7 40. Kf3 Ke7 41. Ke4 Kf8 42. Kd4 Kg7 43. Kd3 Kh6

44. f4 f5 45. Ke3 fxg4 46. hxg4 f5 47. gxf5 gxf5 48. Kf3 Kh5 49. Re2 a4 50. Re6

Bf8 51. Be8+ Kh4 52. Re1 1-0


This Week In Chess


On June 6th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1950 W8 1.0

2 Peter Barlay 1906 W9 1.0

3 Mark McGough 1857 W10 1.0

4 Christophe Motley 1679 W6 1.0

5 Joey Arispe 1259 W7 1.0

6 Richard Buchanan 2000 L4 0.0

7 Michael Smith II 1713 L5 0.0

8 Grayson Ed Harris 1534 L1 0.0

9 Dean W Brown 1460 L2 0.0

10 Kenneth Macrae 1264 L3 0.0

No GOATs Allowed!

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 3, 2019 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from round three of the Colorado Springs Chess Club's May Swiss 90 event.  It was played by Chris Motley and Mark McGough.  They have faced each other six times in the past year, mostly in Quick-rated tournaments.  They are even in Quick (+2-2=1).  This time they met with Turtle Time (G/90+30), a specialty of Mark's.


This game was vying for the Game of the Week prize last week.  However, it lost, as Mark was a bit of a goat for failing to get me the pictures I requested that supplement this game quickly enough.  You see, I wanted to share the major milestone Mark has accomplished in his first year as the Colorado Springs Chess Club Treasurer:  He has re-segregated the bathrooms!



2019 Colorado Springs Chess Club Treasurer, Mark McGough, procures the key to the Men's room and reopens gender specific restroom service on May 28, 2019!


Every chess game tells a story.  Some have pictures.


The story with this game is like a fable with Mark as the Turtle and Chris as the GOAT.  One might call it, "The Tortoise and The GOAT."


Once upon a time there was a GOAT who, boasting how he could play chess better than anyone else, was forever teasing the tortoise for its slowness.  Then one day, the tortoise answered back:  “Who do you think you are?  There’s no denying you’re good, but even you can be beaten!”  The tortoise squealed with laughter.

A game was paired, and the next day at the Colorado Springs Chess Club they stood at the board.  When the clock started, the GOAT jumped out to a huge lead in position and gained a massive time advantage.

When the dust settled, the tortoise had won.  "How is this possible?" the spectators asked.

“Slowly does it every time!  Especially when your opponent is Giving-up Overwhelming Advantages with a Time lead,” the tortoise said.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205744385


Mark found himself in the position above.  Undaunted with his King's Rook seemingly locked away, Mark channeled his experience as Key Master and set about the task of gaining freedom for his King-side pieces.  Yes, it took a long time, but he was able to make due with the Queen-side facilities for the time being.


When the dust settled, Mark had the winning Endgame and was living on turtle time.  Chris was not eager to resign after having thrown away a huge positional advantage with a massive time lead.  However, Mark reminded him of the new bathroom etiquette going into effect with the newly, re-opened Men's room.


After re-opening the restroom, Mark installed a couple of signs to remind chess players that we weren't using the Women's room anymore.  Now, we have to be on good behavior.  No more Thunder Dome.  Respect for others is the rule.  This rule applies to chess as well as bathrooms.  We call it PFTP. 




There is a kind of code at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  You can use terms and phrases that may seem strange in chess, but they are quite well understood here:


  • Turtle = a chess player who thinks G/90;d/5 is blitz
  • GOAT = G iving-up, O verwhelming, A dvantages with, T ime lead
  • PFTP= Don't resign with Mate in 1


The second sign says, "No GOATs Allowed!"  I am not sure what that sign means, but Mark has threatened to close the Men's room if anyone violates it.




No GOATs Allowed!

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114386


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.05.21"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Motley, Chris"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B61"]

[WhiteElo "1662"]

[BlackElo "1823"]

[PlyCount "126"]

[EventDate "2019.05.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. Bg5 Bd7 7. Qd2 Nxd4 8. Qxd4 Qa5 9. Bd2 Qc5 10. Qxc5 dxc5 11. e5 Ng4 12. Nb5 O-O-O 13. f4 a6 14. Na3 Bc6 15. h3 Nf2 16. Rg1 Ne4 17. Ba5 Rd4 18. c3 Rd2 19. Nc4 Rf2 20. Bd3 Rxf4 21. g3 Rf3 22. Bxe4 Bxe4 23. Nd2 Rd3 24. O-O-O Bc6 25. Nc4 Rxd1+ 26. Rxd1 b5 27. Rd8+ Kb7 28. Ne3 g6 29. c4 Bg7 30. Rd2 Bxe5 31. Rf2 Bd4 32. Bd2 f5 33. Re2 Bf3 34. Re1 Be4 35. Nd5 e6 36. Ne3 h5 37. Bc3 Bxc3 38. bxc3 Rd8 39. cxb5 axb5 40. a4 bxa4 41. Nc4 Rd3 42. Kb2 Rxg3 43. h4 Rg4 44. Ne5 Rxh4 45. Nxg6 Rh2+ 46. Ka3 h4 47. Nf4 Bd5 48. Nxd5 exd5 49. Re5 Rh3 50. Rxd5 Rxc3+ 51. Kxa4 f4 52. Rh5 Kc6 53. Rxh4 Kd5 54. Kb5 Ke4 55. Kc6 c4 56. Kc5 Rc2 57. Kb4 Ke3 58. Rh8 f3 59. Re8+ Kf2 60. Rf8 Kg2 61. Rg8+ Kf1 62. Rf8 f2 63. Rf7 Ke1 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 28th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Brian Jo Rountree 1962 W5 D3 W2 W4 3.5 $27.00 1st

2 Paul D Anderson 1950 W7 W4 L1 W5 3.0 $18.00 2nd

3 Christophe Motley 1662 W12 D1 L4 W7 2.5

4 Mark McGough 1823 W10 L2 W3 L1 2.0

5 Grayson Ed Harris 1466 L1 W12 W9 L2 2.0

6 Robert Kohler 1658 H--- H--- U--- W9 2.0 $5.00 GOW

7 Ayush Vispute 1365 L2 H--- W13 L3 1.5 $12.00 U1450

8 Peter Barlay 1906 H--- W11 U--- U--- 1.5

9 Dean W Brown 1442 U--- W10 L5 L6 1.0

10 Clinton Eads 1291 L4 L9 U--- W14 1.0

11 Joey Arispe 1259 H--- L8 U--- U--- 0.5

12 Daniel Rupp 1076 L3 L5 U--- U--- 0.0

13 William Leo Wolf 1300 U--- U--- L7 U--- 0.0

14 Joy Sato unr. U--- U--- U--- L10 0.0

O Is For Overload VIII

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 29, 2019 at 8:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.   I called it the DROP Method (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.   It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.   So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.   The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 8th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/46582179-d-is-for-discovery-vii).   The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 14th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/46726130-r-is-for-removal-viii).   The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload.


Overload is a chess move that attacks a target.


The Overload is played when the player creates a threat on a target that cannot be defended.   The classic example is choosing a target and piling more attackers on it than supports the defender can muster.   When the number of attackers are greater than the number of supports, material can be won through a series of captures.   Each capture creates a new target until the final support is exhausted and an unguarded target appears.


However, the Overload is, perhaps, the most broad kind of tactic.   Not only does it use multiple attackers on one target, but also it uses a single attacker on multiple targets.  The idea is the same:  to gain a target than cannot be defended.  So, most players will become familiar with the different types of Overload:


  • Battery (Overload with multiple attackers on a file or diagonal)
  • Fork (Overload with multiple targets by the Knight)
  • Double Attack (Overload with multiple targets by the other pieces)
  • Over-Worked Piece (Overload with multiple targets)
  • Skewer (Overload with multiple targets where a high value piece is in front)


Here is a position from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's May Swiss 90 tournament.  Robert Kohler played in the Springs until 2004 and recently returned to take on his number 2 foe, Dean Brown.  Dean went after a Pawn (31. RxP), only to leave himself open to the classic Overload tactic.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205736930


O Is For Overload VIII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114366


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.05.28"]

[Round "4.4"]

[White "Brown, Dean"]

[Black "Kohler, Robert"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "1442"]

[BlackElo "1658"]

[PlyCount "62"]

[EventDate "2019.05.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Qa5 5.

Be2 Bf5 6. O-O e6 7. d3 c6 8. Nd4 Bg6 9. Nb3 Qc7 10. Bg5 Nbd7 11. Qc1 Bd6 12.

h3 h6 13. Be3 Nd5 14. Re1 Nxe3 15. Qxe3 O-O 16. Ne4 Be7 17. a4 Nf6 18. Nbd2 Nd5

19. Qf3 Nb4 20. Bd1 c5 21. c3 Nc6 22. Qe3 b6 23. Be2 Rad8 24. Rad1 f5 25. Qg3

Qxg3 26. Nxg3 Bf6 27. Bh5 Bxh5 28. Nxh5 Ne5 29. Nf4 Nxd3 30. Nxd3 Rxd3 31. Rxe6

Rfd8 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 21st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the MaySwiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Brian Jo Rountree 1962 W3 D5 W2 2.5

2 Paul D Anderson 1950 W6 W4 L1 2.0

3 Grayson Ed Harris 1466 L1 W10 W8 2.0

4 Mark McGough 1823 W11 L2 W5 2.0

5 Christophe Motley 1662 W10 D1 L4 1.5

6 Ayush Vispute 1365 L2 H--- W12 1.5

7 Peter Barlay 1906 H--- W9 U--- 1.5

8 Dean W Brown 1442 U--- W11 L3 1.0

9 Joey Arispe 1259 H--- L7 U--- 0.5

10 Daniel Rupp 1076 L5 L3 U--- 0.0

11 Clinton Eads 1291 L4 L8 U--- 0.0

12 William Leo Wolf 1300 U--- U--- L6 0.0

The End Of A Thing

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 21, 2019 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's May Swiss 90 event.  It is a month-long, slow-chess tournament.  Each week the players get one slow game.  It is the favorite of Turtles.


Turtles are chess players who can take an hour on one move, even if it is their first move.  With only one and a half hours in the entire game, turtles can flag in only two moves.  Sometimes when turtles meet, they both flag, and the game is a draw.




However, our turtles are getting better about picking up the pace at the end of the game to avoid the loss on time.


I am just the opposite.  I start fast and slow down at the end. 


Saving my time for the endgame worked out for me in this week's battle against Mark McGough.  He used his time to push for an advantage in the opening.  While I felt he was better most of the game, I just tried to be patient and hold the draw until he made a mistake.


Finally, I got something.  He allowed me to trade off his Knights and leave him with just a Bad Bishop.  Now, I felt I could hold the draw and probe for a win as well.  Of course, my thirty minute time lead dwindled down to five minutes as he kept defending well.


When I stumbled onto the position below, I knew I was going to win.  I just didn't know it was mating and the game reminded me of this verse.


Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.

Ecclesiastes 7:8 (KJV)


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205723387


The End Of A Thing

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114335


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.05.14"]

[Round "2.2"]

[White "McGough, Mark"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B15"]

[WhiteElo "1823"]

[BlackElo "1950"]

[PlyCount "150"]

[EventDate "2019.05.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 c6 2. e4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. e5 Na6 5. f4 h5 6.

Nf3 Nh6 7. Be3 Nc7 8. Bd3 Bf5 9. O-O Ne6 10. Ne2 Ng7 11. c4 Bxd3 12. Qxd3 Ngf5

13. c5 e6 14. b4 Be7 15. Nc3 Qd7 16. Rfb1 O-O 17. b5 Rfb8 18. Rb3 Kg7 19. Rab1

Qc8 20. bxc6 bxc6 21. Bd2 Bd8 22. Na4 Bc7 23. R1b2 Rxb3 24. Rxb3 Rb8 25. Rxb8

Qxb8 26. Qb3 Qc8 27. Qd3 Ng8 28. Nb2 Nge7 29. Qa3 Qb7 30. Qb3 Qb5 31. Kf2 a6

32. Bc3 Nc8 33. Qxb5 cxb5 34. a4 Na7 35. Ke2 Nc6 36. axb5 axb5 37. Nd3 Kf8 38.

Nb4 Nfe7 39. Na6 Bd8 40. Kd3 Ke8 41. Nb4 Kd7 42. Ng5 Nxb4+ 43. Bxb4 Nc6 44. Bc3

Bxg5 45. fxg5 Kc7 46. Bb2 Kb7 47. Kc3 Ka6 48. Kb3 Ka5 49. Bc3+ b4 50. Bb2 Kb5

51. Ba1 Na5+ 52. Kc2 Kc4 53. Bb2 Nc6 54. Ba1 Ne7 55. Bb2 Kb5 56. Kd3 Nf5 57.

Bc1 Ne7 58. Bb2 Nc6 59. Ba1 Na5 60. Bb2 Nc4 61. Bc1 Ka4 62. Kc2 Na5 63. Bb2 Nc6

64. Ba1 Ka3 65. Kb1 Kb3 66. Bb2 Na5 67. Bc1 Kc3 68. Bb2+ Kd3 69. Ka2 Kc2 70.

Ba1 Nc4 71. Bb2 Nxb2 72. c6 Na4 73. c7 Nc3+ 74. Ka1 b3 75. c8=N b2# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 14th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1950 W8 W5 2.0

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1962 W6 D3 1.5

3 Christophe Motley 1662 W10 D2 1.5

4 Peter Barlay 1906 H--- W9 1.5

5 Mark McGough 1823 W11 L1 1.0

6 Grayson Ed Harris 1466 L2 W10 1.0

7 Dean W Brown 1442 U--- W11 1.0

8 Ayush Vispute 1365 L1 H--- 0.5

9 Joey Arispe 1259 H--- L4 0.5

10 Daniel Rupp 1076 L3 L6 0.0

11 Clinton Eads 1291 L5 L7 0.0

R Is For Removal VIII

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 14, 2019 at 5:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).   The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 8th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/46582179-d-is-for-discovery-vii).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal.


Removal is a chess move that attacks a support.


The Removal is played when the player stops an opponent's piece from supporting the actual target.  The supporting piece will typically be of an equal or lesser value than the attacking piece.  However, the Removal can give up material, as the protection on the real target is now gone and creates a second attack that cannot be defended.


The target can be the King (Mate threat), a valuable piece (Material threat), or even a square (Mobility threat).


Different types of Removals are referred to by different names, but the idea is the same: The support of the target is removed.  Here are some names for the different types of Removal:

  • Clearance (Removal by passing support)
  • Deflection (Removal by forcing support to move)
  • Interference (Removal by interposition; Interception)
  • Undermining (Removal by capturing support; trade)
  • Sacrifice (Removal by capturing support; Exchange; Greek Gift, Desperado)

Here is an example from an email match I played with my Dad.  I think I was nervous about playing the tactic here because of Black's counter-play.  So, I tried to prepare it with 16. Re1.  Can you find the better move?


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205713395


R Is For Removal VIII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114313


[Event "2-4"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1997.05.05"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D43"]

[PlyCount "109"]

[EventDate "1997.03.07"]

[TimeControl "0"]

 

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nc3 e6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 Be7 6. e3 O-O 7. c5

b6 8. b4 Nbd7 9. Bd3 a5 10. a3 h6 11. Bh4 Bb7 12. O-O b5 13. Bc2 Nh7 14. Bxe7

Qxe7 15. e4 e5 16. Re1 axb4 17. axb4 Rxa1 18. Qxa1 Ng5 19. Nxe5 Nxe5 20. dxe5

Rd8 21. exd5 cxd5 22. Nxb5 Ne6 23. Nd6 Bc6 24. Qd1 Qg5 25. b5 Bxb5 26. Nxb5

Nxc5 27. Nd6 Ne6 28. Bh7+ Kf8 29. Qxd5 g6 30. Rf1 Kg7 31. f4 Qe7 32. f5 Kxh7

33. fxe6 fxe6 34. Qe4 Qa7+ 35. Kh1 Rd7 36. h3 Rg7 37. Qf4 g5 38. Qf6 Qd7 39.

Qf7 Qxf7 40. Rxf7 Rxf7 41. Nxf7 Kg6 42. Nd6 g4 43. Kh2 Kg5 44. g3 gxh3 45. Kxh3

h5 46. Nc4 Kf5 47. Kh4 Kg6 48. Nd6 Kh6 49. Nf7+ Kg6 50. Ng5 Kf5 51. Kxh5 Kxe5

52. Kg4 Kf6 53. Ne4+ Ke5 54. Kf3 Kf5 55. g4+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 7th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Brian Jo Rountree 1962 W5 1.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1950 W6 1.0

3 Mark McGough 1823 W7 1.0

4 Christophe Motley 1662 W8 1.0

5 Grayson Ed Harris 1466 L1 0.0

6 Ayush Vispute 1365 L2 0.0

7 Clinton Eads 1291 L3 0.0

8 Daniel Rupp 1076 L4 0.0

CSCC vs AFACC

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 7, 2019 at 12:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's (CSCC) team challenge against the Air Force Academy Chess Club (AFACC).  We haven't played in a team tournament since 2007 when we beat the Fort Collins Chess Club to win the Mountain States Chess Club Match Champions trophy:


https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/2929373-too-deep


Back then, we brought our top 8 players to face off against Fort Collins' top 8 players.  This time, the AFACC didn't have as many players and most were not USCF-rated.  So, we tried out a different format.  However, we still put our trophy on the line.  If their team could score more point versus the field of entrants than our team, they would take home the prize.




The AFACC team was made up of Erik Svoboda, Ben Oldemeyer, Hannah Schroeder, Daniel Soto, Hunter Street, and James Stefo.




The CSCC team was made up of our top 6 Supporting Members:  Earle Wikle, Mike Smith, Ayush Vispute, Clint Eads, Paul Anderson, and Mark McGough.




Fortunately, our Supporting Members were up to the task by scoring 16.5 points to out pace the higher-rated, unaffiliated players (12.0) and the AFACC (9.5).  Thanks to all who participated and made this special event a success.  See you in 12 years!


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205700387


CSCC vs AFACC

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114293


[Event "CSCC vs AFACC"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.04.30"]

[Round "2.3"]

[White "Barlay, Peter"]

[Black "Svoboda, Erk"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C44"]

[WhiteElo "1735"]

[BlackElo "1400"]

[PlyCount "17"]

[EventDate "2019.04.30"]

[WhiteTeam "None"]

[BlackTeam "AFACC"]

[TimeControl "900"]


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. e5

Nd5 6. Qb3 Nde7 7. Bc4 d6 8. Bxf7+ Kd7 9. Qe6# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 30th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a team challenge against the Air Force Academy Chess Club (4SS, G/15; d/5).


Standings. CSCC vs AFACC


# Name Rtng Team Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1891 NONE W14 W6 W2 D3 3.5

2 Earle P Wikle 1888 CSCC W17 W9 L1 W7 3.0

3 Paul D Anderson 1939 CSCC D16 W10 W13 D1 3.0

4 Michael Smith II 1576 CSCC W18 W15 L7 W13 3.0

5 Clinton D Eads 1071 CSCC W8 L13 W18 W14 3.0

6 Mark McGough 1631 CSCC W19 L1 W12 D9 2.5

7 Hunter Sco Street 1099 AFACC D13 W20 W4 L2 2.5

8 Peter Barlay 1735 NONE L5 W16 D14 W15 2.5

9 Christophe Motley 1526 NONE W20 L2 W19 D6 2.5

10 John Pletcher unr. AFACC H--- L3 W20 W17 2.5

11 Ayush Pan Vispute 920 CSCC L15 L14 W16 W19 2.0

12 Grayson Ed Harris 1181 NONE U--- W19 L6 W18 2.0

13 Matthew Washington 1754 NONE D7 W5 L3 L4 1.5

14 Ben Oldemeyer 1400 AFACC L1 W11 D8 L5 1.5

15 Daniel Soto 1652 AFACC W11 L4 D17 L8 1.5

16 Erik Svoboda 1400 AFACC D3 L8 L11 W20 1.5

17 William Leo Wolf 1311 CSCC L2 W18 D15 L10 1.5

18 Hannah Schroeder 1000 AFACC L4 L17 L5 L12 0.0

19 James Stefo 1050 AFACC L6 L12 L9 L11 0.0

20 Shiva Aditya unr. NONE L9 L7 L10 L16 0.0


Team Roster and Scores. CSCC vs AFACC


Code Name Score

1 CSCC Colorado Springs Chess Club (1569.3) 16.5

2 NONE (1617.4) 12.0

3 AFA Air Force Academy Chess Club (1266.8) 9.5

Bobby Has Left The Springs

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 24, 2019 at 7:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


One of the biggest chess controversies in Colorado Springs is whether or not Bobby Fischer ever played here.  On one side is the 1st Colorado Springs City Chess Champion (Francis Mason).  On the other side is the 22nd Colorado Springs City Chess Champion (NM Buck Buchanan). 


Francis Mason claims to have played Bobby Fischer when he came to Colorado Springs.  As he was sharing the game of Kings with his son, Curtis Mason, he included his encounter with the King of Kings in his chess war stories.  Of course, Curtis passed along this information with any chess player who was willing to listen. 


"No!" Buck shook his head gruffly.  "Never happened.  Bobby has never been to Colorado Springs." 


Now, on the 55th anniversary, new evidence has appeared that proves once and for all that Bobby Fischer was in Colorado Springs in 1964.


This article appeared on page 1 of the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph from September 2nd, 1972 and recounts the events of the 1964 Bobby Fischer Simul at the Broadmoor.




"Juan, President of the Colorado Springs Chess Club for many years, was ranked as one of the strongest players in Colorado.

In the Fischer-Reid game below, players will note that Reid was a pawn up and in a strong position at move thirty.  But he believed that Bobby's vast experience would beat him in the end game and so he offered a draw.  The international grandmaster accepted instantly, with a grin."

Marshall Sprague, Colorado Springs Sun




White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205683755


Bobby Has Left The Springs

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114257


[Event "1964 Broadmoor Simul"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1964.04.28"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Fischer, Bobby"]

[Black "Reid, Juan"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "C41"]

[PlyCount "60"]

[EventDate "1964.04.28"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 exd4 5. Nxd4

Be7 6. f3 Nbd7 7. Be3 Ne5 8. Qd2 c5 9. Bb5+ Bd7 10. Nf5 O-O 11. Bxd7 Qxd7 12.

O-O-O Nc4 13. Qe2 Nxe3 14. Qxe3 Rfd8 15. g4 Bf8 16. e5 Ne8 17. Ne4 Qc7 18. exd6

Nxd6 19. Nexd6 Bxd6 20. Nxd6 Rxd6 21. Rxd6 Qxd6 22. Rd1 Qxh2 23. Qe7 Qb8 24.

Rd7 Qf4+ 25. Kb1 g6 26. Qe2 b6 27. a3 a6 28. Qd3 b5 29. Qd5 Re8 30. Ka2 Re5

1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On April 23rd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Gunnar Andersen 2102 W13 W7 W3 W8 D2 W4 5.5 $37.00 1st

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 1891 L9 W5 W8 W3 D1 W7 4.5 $25.00 2nd

3 Paul D Anderson 1939 W6 W4 L1 L2 W9 W8 4.0

4 Mitchell Anderson 1887 W12 L3 W13 W7 W5 L1 4.0

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1669 H--- L2 W11 W9 L4 W13 3.5

6 Joel Brown 1334 L3 W12 L7 D10 W15 W11 3.5 $16.00 U1500

7 Mark McGough 1722 W11 L1 W6 L4 W12 L2 3.0

8 Earle P Wikle 1888 W15 W9 L2 L1 W10 L3 3.0

9 Ayush Vispute 1228 W2 L8 W14 L5 L3 W12 3.0

10 Christophe Motley 1526 H--- H--- H--- D6 L8 W15 3.0

11 Jonathan Brown unr. L7 D14 L5 W15 W13 L6 2.5 $5.00 GOW

12 Grayson Ed Harris 1007 L4 L6 W15 W13 L7 L9 2.0

13 Dean W Brown 1400 L1 W15 L4 L12 L11 L5 1.0

14 William Leo Wolf 1311 U--- D11 L9 U--- U--- U--- 0.5

15 Clinton Eads 1027 L8 L13 L12 L11 L6 L10 0.0

I Like Quick

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 18, 2019 at 6:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's April Quick Six event.  We have 8 slow chess months and 4 special chess months each year on the club's calendar.  The slow months are G/90+30, month-long tournaments.  The special events are the Speed Chess Championship (January), Cabin Fever Reliever (April), July Mating Game (July), and City Championship (October).  Since the Cabin Fever Reliever and July Mating Game are only two week events, we fill in the extra Tuesdays with these Quick events.


Some of our Turtles don't like quick.  They take a break in April and July.  Some players like quick.  They come out in April and July.  Well, sometimes.


I like quick.


When I was a kid growing up in the suburbs of Chicago (Naperville), I would come home from school and make myself a glass of milk and add Nestle Quik.  Nestle Quik was a chocolate powder to turn ordinary milk into a magical potion!  My favorite thing to do was add the powder and then freeze the drink.  It turned into a type of fudgesicle that I would eat with a spoon, as I watched the Cubbies play.


So, these tournament are like turning chess into a magical dessert for me.  You can't have them all the time, but every once in a while, they are a nice treat.


Our newcomer, Jonathan Brown, enjoyed his treat by getting his first rated draw against Will Wolf.  However, he had a big advantage in this position and could have gotten the win if he found the surprising best move.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205668375


I Like Quick

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114222


[Event "April Quick Six"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.04.16"]

[Round "2.7"]

[White "Brown, Jonathan"]

[Black "Wolf, Will"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "C45"]

[WhiteElo "1"]

[BlackElo "1311"]

[PlyCount "52"]

[EventDate "2019.04.16"]

[TimeControl "1440"]


1. e4 Nc6 2. d4 e5 3. Nf3 exd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5.

Nxc6 bxc6 6. Nc3 d6 7. Bg5 Be7 8. Bd3 Rb8 9. Rb1 Nd7 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 11. O-O Ne5

12. Re1 Nxd3 13. cxd3 O-O 14. h3 Qg5 15. Re3 f5 16. Rg3 Qh6 17. Qa4 Qd2 18. Qd4

Rf7 19. b3 fxe4 20. Nxe4 Qc2 21. Re1 Bf5 22. Nf6+ Kh8 23. Nh5 Bg6 24. Qxa7 Rbf8

25. Nxg7 Rxg7 26. Qd4 Qc5 1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On April 16th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Gunnar Andersen 2102 W10 W5 W2 3.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1939 W9 W7 L1 2.0

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 1891 L4 W8 W6 2.0

4 Ayush Vispute 1228 W3 L6 W13 2.0

5 Mark McGough 1722 W12 L1 W9 2.0

6 Earle P Wikle 1888 W14 W4 L3 2.0

7 Mitchell Anderson 1887 W11 L2 W10 2.0

8 Brian Jo Rountree 1669 H--- L3 W12 1.5

9 Joel Brown 1334 L2 W11 L5 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1400 L1 W14 L7 1.0

11 Grayson Ed Harris 1007 L7 L9 W14 1.0

12 Jonathan Brown unr. L5 D13 L8 0.5

13 William Leo Wolf 1311 U--- D12 L4 0.5

14 Clinton Eads 1027 L6 L10 L11 0.0

Guys In Costumes

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 14, 2019 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Tim Brennan


There is a YUGE event this week that millions of people around the world have been looking forward to for years!  No, not the final season of Game of Thrones!  I'm talking about the 15th year of Tim Brennan Week in the Colorado Springs Chess Club Newsletter!


Thanks Paul for inviting me back for the 15th year!  I'm honored!  Kudos to Paul for keeping his newsletter going for this long as well!  That is a great accomplishment!


Although I do not play as much chess as I used to, chess is always in my heart.


I got to spend some time with Paul this past summer at the Renaissance Festival in Larkspur, which is always a good time. As usual, we were dressed as monks, and played the public for one dollar a game.  If we win, we keep the dollar.   If they win, they get a prize.  Our goal is always to give out zero prizes!




My funniest story from this past year was a guy who came up to me, and confidently said something to me like, "I hope you are ready to lose," in a thick Russian accent (like Ivan Drago in Rocky IV).   I smiled and then proceeded to checkmate him in about 8-10 moves, using about one second per move.  He was shocked!  He said, "I thought you were just guys in costumes!"  :lol:


Right now, I am excited about the upcoming Denver Open!  It takes place April 26-28 at the Embassy Suites in the Denver Tech Center.   Full details here: https://caissachess.net/online-registration/index/471


Brian Wall and the Denver Chess Club have been recruiting strong players from all over the country to attend this tournament. Here are some of the strong players who have registered already:


  1. 14958890 2635 CORRALES JIMENEZ
  2. 12077910 2584 ALEXANDER FISHBEIN
  3. 13215196 2583 ANDREW TANG
  4. 15229287 2562 ANDREY GOROVETS
  5. 12442362 2543 JESSE KRAAI
  6. 16083805 2520 PRASANNA RAGH RAO
  7. 12659833 2489 DANIEL M RENSCH
  8. 12851435 2462 TATEV ABRAHAMYAN
  9. 12445752 2443 DEAN IPPOLITO
  10. 12426279 2410 DAVID VIGORITO
  11. 12563733 2332 LIOR CHAIM LAPID
  12. 10373638 2292 JOHN L WATSON


Wow!  I think that is really exciting!  This will be the strongest tournament in Colorado since the Edward Levy tournaments in the early aughts. I'm signed up, and ready to go!


One other thing I am excited about these days is a new interactive online Tactics Time chess course that just came out on the website chessable.com. The funny thing is:  I had no idea that this was in the works!


Someone sent me an email last month asking about one of the positions that was in the this course, because he was one of the beta-testers.  I wrote back that I had no clue what he was talking about.   He got me in touch with the creator of the site, and I discovered that this was all legitimate, and New in Chess had set the whole thing up.  The course just came out recently.  You may have seen the ad for it in the April 2019 issue of the Colorado Chess Informant.


I think it is really cool.  The whole thing is based on "spaced repetition."  Similar to using "flash cards."  I am really impressed with chessable in general, and it is worth checking out!  You can checkout the new online Tactics Time course here:  https://www.chessable.com/tactics-time-1/course/21108/


Below is one of my favorite games. It comes from the Millionaire Chess 2 tournament, which was held at the Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas.   I had an amazing time at the tournament.  Joel Johnson published this game in one of his Attacking books (which are highly recommended!).


Thanks again Paul for all of your hard work!


Hope to see everyone at the Denver Open! 


Your Friend,

Tim


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205663670


Guys In Costumes

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114194


[Event "Millionaire Chess Open 2"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2015.10.10"]

[Round "6"]

[White "Brennan, Tim"]

[Black "Aregbeyen, Aigboje"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "1800"]

[BlackElo "1944"]

[PlyCount "35"]


1. e4 d6 2. Nc3 g6 3. f4 Bg7 4. Bc4 Nd7 5. Nf3 e6 6. d3 a6 7. a4 Ne7 8. O-O O-O

9. Qe1 b6 10. Qh4 h6 11. f5 exf5 12. Bxh6 fxe4 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. Ng5 Nf6 15.

Rxf6 Nf5 16. Rxf7+ Rxf7 17. Qh7+ Kf6 18. Ncxe4+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 9th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45; d/10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Mitchell Anderson 1970 W8 W4 W3 L2 3.0 $28.00 1st

2 Christophe Motley 1582 W10 L3 W6 W1 3.0 $28.00 1st + $5.00 GOW

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W9 W2 L1 D4 2.5

4 Mark McGough 1822 W7 L1 W9 D3 2.5

5 Ayush Vispute 1307 H--- U--- W7 W9 2.5 $14.00 U1450

6 Grayson Ed Harris 1471 W11 L9 L2 W10 2.0

7 Clinton Eads 1301 L4 W10 L5 D8 1.5

8 William Leo Wolf 1303 L1 W11 U--- D7 1.5

9 Dean W Brown 1421 L3 W6 L4 L5 1.0

10 Earle Macenulty 1118 L2 L7 X11 L6 1.0

11 Colum Ashlin unr. L6 L8 F10 U--- 0.0

D Is For Discovery VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 8, 2019 at 5:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery.


Discovery is a chess move that attacks with two pieces.


The Discovery is played when a player is going to make an attack with the piece that he moves, but also he will make an attack with another piece that was blocked by the piece that he moves.  When the Discovery is successful, the opponent can only avoid one of the attacks.   This means that the other attack will gain material or mate.  The second attack is often a check on the King, which is called a Discovered Check.


"Discovered check is the dive bomber of the Chessboard."

(Reuben Fine)


Here is a position from a game played between Chris Motley and Asher MacEnulty in the Cabin Fever Reliever from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night April tournament.



Spectators gather at the final board of the night in the Cabin Fever Reliever.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205654701


The Discovery is played by capturing the Bishop on h6.  This move is an attack on the White King, the Discovered Check.  White has to move the King.  However, when the Discovery is added into the mix, the attack is even better.  The Bishop capture reveals an attack on the White Queen.


The first attack is a capture and check of the King.   The second attack is a capture of the Queen.  White has to defend the King by the rules of the game.  The Bishop and Queen loss puts Black back in control of the game.


So, by just being observant, a player can find these Discovery opportunities and salvage a bad position.


D Is For Discovery VII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114170


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.04.02"]

[Round "1.4"]

[White "Motley, Chris"]

[Black "MacEnulty, Asher"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C23"]

[WhiteElo "1582"]

[BlackElo "1118"]

[PlyCount "57"]

[EventDate "2019.04.02"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 c5 3. Qh5 g6 4. Qxe5+ Qe7 5. Qxh8

Qxe4+ 6. Be2 Qxg2 7. Bf3 Qg5 8. Qxg8 h6 9. Nc3 Qe5+ 10. Nge2 d6 11. d4 Qf6 12.

Bd5 Be6 13. Bxh6 Nd7 14. Bxb7 Rb8 15. Bc6 Ke7 16. Bxd7 Kxd7 17. O-O-O Bxh6+ 18.

Kb1 Rxg8 19. dxc5 Kc6 20. Rxd6+ Kxc5 21. Ne4+ Kb5 22. Nxf6 Kc5 23. Ne4+ Kb5 24.

Nd4+ Ka5 25. Nc6+ Kb5 26. Nxa7+ Ka5 27. a3 Bg7 28. b4+ Ka4 29. Ra6# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 2nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45; d/10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W4 W5 2.0

2 Mitchell Anderson 1970 W6 W3 2.0

3 Mark McGough 1822 W8 L2 1.0

4 Dean W Brown 1421 L1 W7 1.0

5 Christophe Motley 1582 W9 L1 1.0

6 William Leo Wolf 1303 L2 W10 1.0

7 Grayson Ed Harris 1471 W10 L4 1.0

8 Clinton Eads 1301 L3 W9 1.0

9 Earle Macenulty 1118 L5 L8 0.0

10 Colum Ashlin unr. L7 L6 0.0

The Scandinavian

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 3, 2019 at 6:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the March Swiss 90, round 4.  It was played by Alex Bozhenov and Jesse Williams.  They have played 36 times before.  27 in the past year!  They are on pace to break my personal best of 87 USCF-rated games against Mark McGough.


This time Jesse tried the Scandinavian Defense:  1.e4 d5


I can't remember ever playing this opening myself.  However, I am curious about trying it, as I am 1/4th Swedish and 1/8th Norwegian (37.5% Scandinavian).  Also, my son just took a genetic test and found out he is 20.6% Scandinavian.


I have played the English, but if there are other openings you think I should try, let me know.  Here are my genetic proclivities:


3/8th German

1/4th Swedish

3/16th English

1/8th Norwegian

1/16th Irish (just a wee bit Irish)


I am guessing that Jesse has very little Scandinavian DNA, as he did little justice to this defense against Bozhenov's attack.  It was like the Russians pulling the Swedish King out of Finland in 1809.


White to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205646963


The Scandinavian

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114150


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.03.26"]

[Round "4.2"]

[White "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Black "Williams, Jesse"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "1980"]

[BlackElo "1731"]

[PlyCount "37"]

[EventDate "2019.03.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 4. d4 Bf5 5. Nf3

Nf6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O Be7 8. Bb3 a6 9. Ne5 Nbd7 10. Qf3 c6 11. Nxf7 Bg4 12. Nxd8

Bxf3 13. Nxe6 Bd5 14. Nc7+ Kd8 15. N3xd5 cxd5 16. Nxd5 Rc8 17. Nxe7 Kxe7 18.

Re1+ Kd8 19. Bf4 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 26th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1985 W10 D4 W5 D3 3.0 $19.00 1st

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W12 L5 W4 W8 3.0 $19.00 1st

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1869 W13 H--- W8 D1 3.0 $19.00 1st

4 Christophe Motley 1599 W11 D1 L2 W10 2.5

5 Josh S Bloomer 2323 W9 W2 L1 U--- 2.0

6 Grayson Ed Harris 1490 W14 L8 W7 U--- 2.0 $15.00 u1500 + $5.00 GOW

7 Mark McGough 1863 H--- H--- L6 W12 2.0

8 Jesse Williams 1731 H--- W6 L3 L2 1.5

9 Ross Inman 1481 L5 D12 W11 U--- 1.5

10 Dean W Brown 1444 L1 L11 W12 L4 1.0 $5.00 GOW

11 Scott Ch Williams 1225 L4 W10 L9 U--- 1.0 $5.00 GOW

12 Gerald Mena 1362 L2 D9 L10 L7 0.5

13 Clinton Eads 1307 L3 H--- U--- U--- 0.5

14 Nick A Curott 1161 L6 U--- U--- U--- 0.0

Father And Son

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 26, 2019 at 4:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the March Swiss 90, round 3.  It was played by Grayson Harris and Mark McGough.  They have met four times before with Mark getting the upper hand every time.  However, Grayson has been improving rapidly.


Grayson started at the Colorado Springs Chess Club in September 2017 as a beginner.  He has continued to come back and play as often as he can.  He took Mike Madsen's chess class at Air Academy High School.  He takes lessons from LM Josh Bloomer.  So, it is no wonder he is getting good.


So far, Grayson has been published by me twice.  Both losses.  This is not uncommon when you are starting out since you have more losses than wins to get chosen.  I even published a game where Mark beat Grayson last year. 


Now, it was time for revenge.  After getting a draw against me earlier this year, Grayson was ready to notch his highest rated victory, surpassing his quick-win over Jeff Fox at 1849.


I have two games in my USCF database against a Harris:  the  father [2004] and the son [2018].  Grayson has already surpassed his father by drawing me at 1953 while his dad got a loss when I was 1782 and his dad was 1234.  He has even passed his dad's higest victory versus a 1719. 


I was similar.  I started coming to the Colorado Springs Chess Club to get better than my father.  So, I figured I would share some fatherly advice to Grayson to help him when he finds himself in a position like this.


I was once like you are now, and I know that it's not easy,

To be calm when you've found something going on

But take your time, think a lot...

Cat Stevens


White to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205635828


Father And Son

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114091


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.03.19"]

[Round "3.4"]

[White "Harris, Grayson"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A45"]

[WhiteElo "1490"]

[BlackElo "1863"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2019.03.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 d6 3. Nc3 g6 4. e4 Bg7 5. Qd2 c6

6. Bh6 O-O 7. O-O-O b5 8. f3 b4 9. Na4 Qa5 10. b3 Ba6 11. Kb1 Bxf1 12. Bxg7

Kxg7 13. Rxf1 Nbd7 14. g4 c5 15. Nb2 cxd4 16. Qxd4 Qc5 17. Qd1 a5 18. Na4 Qe5

19. Nb2 Nb6 20. Nd3 Qb5 21. Ne2 e5 22. Qd2 Rfe8 23. h4 d5 24. h5 dxe4 25. hxg6

fxg6 26. Qh6+ Kg8 27. fxe4 Nbd7 28. g5 Nh5 29. Rxh5 gxh5 30. g6 Re7 31. Ng3 Rg7

32. Nf5 Rxg6 33. Ne7+ Kh8 34. Nxg6+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 19th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1985 W10 D6 W3 2.5

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1869 W13 H--- W7 2.5

3 Josh S Bloomer 2323 W8 W4 L1 2.0

4 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W12 L3 W6 2.0

5 Grayson Ed Harris 1490 W14 L7 W11 2.0

6 Christophe Motley 1599 W9 D1 L4 1.5

7 Jesse Williams 1731 H--- W5 L2 1.5

8 Ross Inman 1481 L3 D12 W9 1.5

9 Scott Ch Williams 1225 L6 W10 L8 1.0 $5.00 GOW

10 Dean W Brown 1444 L1 L9 W12 1.0 $5.00 GOW

11 Mark McGough 1863 H--- H--- L5 1.0

12 Gerald Mena 1362 L4 D8 L10 0.5

13 Clinton Eads 1307 L2 H--- U--- 0.5

14 Nick A Curott 1161 L5 U--- U--- 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $34.00; 2nd $23.00; U1500 $15.00

Scottch ROOM Attack

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 18, 2019 at 6:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the March Swiss 90, round 2.  It was played by Dean Brown and Scott "Scottch" Williams.  They have faced each other 14 times in rated chess.  Scottch needed this game to pull even with a +7-7=1 score.


Dean helped out with Scottch's quest by getting his Bishop trapped and going down material.  However, Scottch didn't just trade down to a winning endgame.  He kept looking for the best moves when he ran across a nice attack in this position.


Black to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205624273


I came up with a method to simplfy the list of tactics called the DROP Method.  Each letter in the acronym stands for each of the different basic kinds of tactics:  D = Discovery, R = Removal, O = Overload, and P = Pin.


Getting good at chess means combining the basic tactics into a pattern that is hard to comprehend and wins material or mates.


These tactial combinations often get a new name, as if they are a brand new tactic.  However, it is just the same stuff in a different wrapper.


The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.


Ecclesiastes 1:9 (KJV)


So, here is my new wrapper:  The Scottch ROOM attack.


This tactical combination comes from "Scottch" Williams who took the above position and added a few basic tactics to come up with a new brew.


19...Bxh2+!! starts the newly minted Scottch ROOM attack with a Removal = R

20.Kxh2 Qh4+ an Overload occurs by the Queen attacking the King and Pawn = O

21.Kg1 Qxf2+ another Overload occurs when 2 pieces attack a once-guarded piece = O

22.Kh2 Rf5 a Mating Attack forces the material gain = M

23.Qxf5 exf5


And please turn out the lights out after leaving the ROOM.


Scottch ROOM Attack

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114061


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.03.12"]

[Round "2.5"]

[White "Brown, Dean"]

[Black "Williams, Scott"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C10"]

[WhiteElo "1444"]

[BlackElo "1225"]

[PlyCount "46"]

[EventDate "2019.03.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 a6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 Be7

6. Bxf6 Bxf6 7. e5 Be7 8. Bd3 c5 9. O-O Nc6 10. Ne2 c4 11. Bxc4 dxc4 12. c3 O-O

13. Qd2 f6 14. exf6 Bxf6 15. Rad1 Ne7 16. Rfe1 Nd5 17. Ne5 Bg5 18. Qc2 Bf4 19.

Nxc4 Bxh2+ 20. Kxh2 Qh4+ 21. Kg1 Qxf2+ 22. Kh2 Nf4 23. Ne3 Rf6 0-1


This Week In Chess


On March 12th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2323 W9 W6 2.0

2 Christophe Motley 1599 W8 D3 1.5

3 Paul D Anderson 1985 W12 D2 1.5

4 Jesse Williams 1731 H--- W7 1.5

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1869 W11 H--- 1.5

6 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W10 L1 1.0

7 Grayson Ed Harris 1490 W13 L4 1.0

8 Scott Ch Williams 1225 L2 W12 1.0

9 Ross Inman 1481 L1 D10 0.5

10 Gerald Mena 1362 L6 D9 0.5

11 Clinton Eads 1307 L5 H--- 0.5

12 Dean W Brown 1444 L3 L8 0.0

13 Nick A Curott 1161 L7 U--- 0.0

Forty Stripes Save One

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 11, 2019 at 7:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the March Swiss 90, going on at the Colorado Springs Chess Club this month.  My opponent was Dean Brown.  We have played 65 rated games over the years.  He used to be my "whipping boy" until Mark McGough passed him up for the most losses from one opponent in 2016.


However, when you look at just standard-rated games, Dean is still the "standard whipping boy."  He had 38 losses to me, with Mark McGough and Brian Rountree tied at 36.  So, you might think that I would feel confident about getting the victory against him.  Such is not the case.


I am still the highest rated player Dean has beaten.  I was rated 2042 in 2012 the last time he got me in a standard game.  But, he almost got me last month.


So, I was trying to play better this time and get to thirty-nine.  However, I might be close to my limit.  I don't know how many more times I can beat Dean without him getting mad at me.


Forty stripes he may give him, and not exceed: lest, if he should exceed, and beat him above these with many stripes, then thy brother should seem vile unto thee.


Deuteronomy 25:3 (KJV)


White to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205614998


Forty Stripes Save One

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=114018


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.03.05"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Brown, Dean"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A60"]

[WhiteElo "1985"]

[BlackElo "1444"]

[PlyCount "69"]

[EventDate "2019.03.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. d5 exd5 5. cxd5

Bd6 6. e4 Bc7 7. Nf3 d6 8. Bb5+ Bd7 9. O-O O-O 10. Bf4 Nh5 11. Bg5 f6 12. Be3

g6 13. Be2 a6 14. a4 Bg4 15. h3 Bxf3 16. Bxf3 Ng7 17. Be2 Ba5 18. Qb3 b6 19.

Na2 Nd7 20. f4 Qe7 21. Bf3 Kh8 22. Rad1 Rac8 23. Qc4 f5 24. e5 dxe5 25. d6 Qf6

26. Bb7 Rcd8 27. b4 cxb4 28. Nxb4 Bxb4 29. Qxb4 a5 30. Qb2 Rfe8 31. Bc6 exf4

32. Bd4 Qf8 33. Rfe1 Rxe1+ 34. Rxe1 Qf7 35. Re7 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 5th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2323 W7 1.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1985 W8 1.0

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 1980 W9 1.0

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1869 W10 1.0

5 Christophe Motley 1599 W11 1.0

6 Grayson Ed Harris 1490 W12 1.0

7 Ross Inman 1481 L1 0.0

8 Dean W Brown 1444 L2 0.0

9 Gerald Mena 1362 L3 0.0

10 Clinton Eads 1307 L4 0.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1225 L5 0.0

12 Nick A Curott 1161 L6 0.0

White Pieces' Burden

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 4, 2019 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Speed King III


Monday, March 4th, 2019


I am back for another season of chess news and games.  Last year, I suffered another down year rating-wise.  This makes three down years in a row.  Ouch!  I have never had three bad years in a row before.


However, while the rating is on the skids, the championships are still cruising along.  I defended my title and am the Speed King again.  Long live the King!


I picked up my third Colorado Springs City Speed Chess Championship in January.  It is the first time I have won it in back-to-back years, moving into the category with LM Josh Bloomer (2005 & 2006) and Dan Avery (2000 & 2001; 2011 & 2012).  Also, it moved me into third place for the total number of crowns behind Josh (7) and Dan (6).


Here is the music that inspired me:


You need Adobe Flash Player to view this content.



Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the January One Night Quick.  It is a one-night event.  All the games in the tournament are completed in one evening.  Players enter the event, play all their games, collect their prizes, and get their ratings updated in less than 24 hours.


This kind of event works well to fill an extra Tuesday, like the 5th Tuesday of a month.  They occur a couple times each year and are the source of the main controversy at the Colorado Springs Chess Club's annual meeting.  Every year, attendees meet to take care of club business and fight over who gets control of the 5th Tuesday:  the Turtles or the Hares.


This year the Turtles won.  However, it was a hollow victory, as the 5th Tuesdays don't fall on any of the months we have our month-long, slow tournaments (G/90+30).


So, we still need some kind of quick events to fill the 5th Tuesdays in April and July.


I don't mind the quick events, as they make for some crazy games.  In fact, the past couple of quicker tournaments have provided games that qualify for the Jim Burden Award.


You can view the winners here:


https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/4007078-for-such-a-time-as-this


The Jim Burden Award can be earned by submitting a game to LM Brian Wall where you drop your Queen, refuse to resign, and get the win.


It has become my burden to keep this award going when Brian drops the ball and forgets to pick a winner.  Typically, I send him every blitz game I win, where I make a colossal mistake with my Queen.  I am more likely to resign when I drop a Rook than a Queen.  However, every now and then I suggest someone else's game.


I suggested the winners in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2016, and 2018.  Now, I am shooting for the 2019 winner.  The award is supposed to be announced April 1st, and this year, Brian should be able to make the announcement on time, thanks to this gem.


It was the classic battle of tortoise versus hare during our 5th Tuesday event:  the January One Night Quick.  Clint Eads decided to play in our quick tournament (G/20; d/5) since our Supporting Members get a free entry to these kinds of events.


Clint knew his chances to get a win were slim, as he typically takes 20 minutes for his first couple of moves.  However, he took his time and took advantage of some opening mistakes to get the lead.


Then he found himself in this position with his clock rapidly dwindling down.  Could he handle the burden of having the superior force but limited time?  Could any white player manage this burden?


Sometimes good fortune is too much to handle.


White to move



You can view the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205600685


White Pieces' Burden

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=113980


[Event "January One Night Quick"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.01.29"]

[Round "4.3"]

[White "Eads, Clint"]

[Black "Motley, Chris"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B00"]

[WhiteElo "1027"]

[BlackElo "1528"]

[PlyCount "96"]

[EventDate "2019.01.29"]

[TimeControl "1200"]


1. e4 g5 2. d4 b5 3. Nc3 b4 4. Nce2 h6 5. Ng3 d6

6. h3 Nf6 7. Bc4 Bg7 8. f3 Nc6 9. Bb5 Bb7 10. d5 a6 11. dxc6 axb5 12. cxb7 Rb8

13. Nf5 Bf8 14. Bd2 e6 15. Ne3 c5 16. c3 d5 17. Qe2 Rxb7 18. exd5 Nxd5 19. Nxd5

Qxd5 20. a4 Qb3 21. axb5 Qxb2 22. Ra8+ Ke7 23. Bxg5+ hxg5 24. Qxb2 Bg7 25. Rxh8

Bxh8 26. Ne2 Rxb5 27. O-O c4 28. Ra1 b3 29. Nd4 Bxd4+ 30. cxd4 Rb7 31. Ra6 Rc7

32. Ra5 c3 33. Qxb3 c2 34. Ra1 c1=R+ 35. Rxc1 Rxc1+ 36. Kh2 Rc7 37. Qb4+ Kf6

38. g4 Kg6 39. Qb5 Re7 40. h4 f6 41. f4 gxh4 42. Qh5+ Kg7 43. Qxh4 Rf7 44. g5

Kg8 45. Qg4 f5 46. Kg3 fxg4 47. Kxg4 Rf5 48. Kh5 Kg7 0-1


This Week In Chess


On February 26th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its February Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. February Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Brian Jo Rountree 1833 W5 H--- W6 W3 3.5 $40.00 1st

2 Gerald Mena 1362 L4 W18 W10 W9 3.0 $27.00 2nd

3 Paul D Anderson 1985 W9 D6 W7 L1 2.5

4 Mark McGough 1876 W2 L7 W14 D6 2.5

5 Ayush Vispute 1319 L1 W19 D9 W14 2.5 $18.00 U1700

6 Jesse Williams 1729 W15 D3 L1 D4 2.0

7 Ross Inman 1481 W10 W4 L3 U--- 2.0

8 Peter Barlay 1903 W14 U--- U--- W15 2.0

9 Dean W Brown 1469 L3 W16 D5 L2 1.5

10 Richard Buchanan 2000 L7 H--- L2 W21 1.5

11 Daniel J Rupp 986 L12 H--- W20 U--- 1.5 $12.00 U1300

12 Christophe Motley 1605 W11 H--- U--- U--- 1.5

13 Michael Smith II 1724 W17 H--- U--- U--- 1.5

14 Grayson Ed Harris 1406 L8 W15 L4 L5 1.0

15 Clinton D Eads 1268 L6 L14 W17 L8 1.0

16 Jonathan Reinhard 836 H--- L9 U--- U--- 0.5

17 Darren Walker 1167 L13 U--- L15 U--- 0.0

18 Donald Hillman 1005 U--- L2 U--- U--- 0.0

19 Joseph Griffin 725 U--- L5 U--- U--- 0.0

20 Kenneth Macrae 1306 U--- U--- L11 U--- 0.0

21 William Leo Wolf 1300 U--- U--- U--- L10 0.0

Game Of The Year XV

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 19, 2018 at 9:35 PM Comments comments (0)

End Of The Season

Thursday, September 20, 2018


Well, another chess season has come to a close for me.  It is time for me to move on to managing the website for my other hobby (https://spamfootball.webs.com/), but I will return after the football season ends.  Before I go, I wanted to clean up some loose ends.


Of course, you can still send in news items or articles during the off-season, and I will email them along to the subscribers.  Any games I receive will be stored at the Colorado Springs Chess News’ Yahoo! group (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/cs_chess/info).  You can also join the group to keep receiving chess games all year round.


So, before I finish typing my chess thoughts for another year, I want to thank all the people who sent in games and articles, all the people who took the time to tell me something nice about the newsletter, and all the people who take the time to read this.


Game Of The Year


Usually at this time, I look over the past year's statistics to see if it was a good or bad year for me.  Looking over the statistics helps me get past the bad feelings that linger from my losses.  They bring me back into balance and force me to look at what I did right and what I did wrong.  While the past couple of years have been off and 2018 isn't looking much better, I still have time to improve 2018.   Here is how it is going so far:


2045 peak USCF rating (record: 2015 - 2102)

2067 peak BLITZ rating (record: 2017 - 2067)

2055 peak CLUB rating (record: 2013 - 2127)


77.08% USCF winning percentage (record: 2012 - 79.31%)

79.07% CLUB winning percentage (record: 2013 - 87.86%)


12 projected prizes won (record: 2014 - 20)

25 projected USCF-rated wins (record: 2013 - 75.5)

0 upsets (record: 2001 - 6)


Peak Rating Report


Year, Peak Rating, Gain


1998 1680 +

1999 1580 -

2000 1567 -

2001 1695 +

2002 1757 +

2003 1772 +

2004 1805 +

2005 1864 +

2006 1882 +

2007 1897 +

2008 1962 +

2009 2003 +

2010 1977 -

2011 2000 +

2012 2043 +

2013 2058 +

2014 2098 +

2015 2102 +

2016 2053 -

2017 2048 -

2018 2039 ?


Total: 15 positive years and 5 negative years


So, what happened in 2015 when my rating started to tumble back down from my peak?


I started directing tournaments for the Colorado Springs Chess Club in 2015.  It is not easy to direct and play well.  I still haven't figured out how to find the balance between focusing on my game and taking care of the event duties.


However, directing hasn't been all bad.


Directing tournaments for the Colorado Springs Chess Club is a nice way to give back to the club I have enjoyed for 20 years.  My largest pay day for chess was while I was a tournament director.  I get a lot of material for my newsletter.  And every once in a while, I get to see a game that just makes my year.


Larry Osborn provided me with the most enjoyable game of the year.  Since I play and direct, I didn't get any time to watch his game.  However, my Vice President, Peter Barlay saw the ending and told me, "You are going to love this!"  I went over the score sheet at IHOB, as I was uploading the ratings report to USCF at 2:00 am in the morning.


I burst into laugher when I saw 14. Qh5+!!! 


It was not because of the blunder.  It was because I knew Larry had won.  It was not just an upset of a higher rated player.  It was a comeback against a higher rated player after hanging his Queen! 


It was the chess equivalent of a hail mary pass.  Instead of the "Minnesota Miracle," it was the Colorado Springs Miracle!


I go over hundreds of games each year just hoping to find a game like this so that I can send LM Brian Wall a legitimate contender for the Jim Burden Award rather than my crappy, blitz blunders (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/4007078-for-such-a-time-as-this).


Here is my nomination for the 2018 Jim Burden Award.


White to move


See diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205323436


Game Of The Year XV

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=113145


[Event "July Mating Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.07.24"]

[Round "4.3"]

[White "Osborn, Larry"]

[Black "Eskeldson, Derek"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D30"]

[WhiteElo "949"]

[BlackElo "1341"]

[PlyCount "49"]

[EventDate "2018.07.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. a3 Nf6 4. e3 c6 5. Bd3 Bd6

6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O Nbd7 8. Nbd2 b6 9. e4 dxe4 10. Nxe4 Nxe4 11. Bxe4 Bb7 12.

Bxh7+ Kxh7 13. Ng5+ Kg6 14. Qh5+ Kxh5 15. f4 Be7 16. d5 cxd5 17. h3 dxc4 18.

g4+ Kh4 19. Kh2 Bd6 20. Be3 Bc5 21. Rf3 Ne5 22. b4 Nxf3+ 23. Nxf3+ Bxf3 24.

bxc5 Qd3 25. Bf2# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On September 19th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the September Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. September Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Laurence Rob Wutt 1948 W14 W7 W2 3.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1989 W4 W9 L1 2.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1885 H--- H--- W11 2.0

4 Ross Inman 1367 L2 W15 W9 2.0

5 Clinton D Eads 1268 L8 W14 W13 2.0

6 Scott J Walsh 1642 H--- H--- D7 1.5

7 Grayson Ed Harris 1111 W13 L1 D6 1.5

8 Peter Barlay 1936 W5 U--- U--- 1.0

9 Mark McGough 1849 W15 L2 L4 1.0

10 William Leo Wolf 1425 W16 U--- U--- 1.0

11 Dean W Brown 1400 U--- W12 L3 1.0

12 Michael Smith II 1610 H--- L11 U--- 0.5

13 Christophe Motley 1584 L7 H--- L5 0.5

14 Scott Ch Williams 1293 L1 L5 U--- 0.0

15 Joey Arispe 1231 L9 L4 U--- 0.0

16 Sam Hays unr. L10 U--- U--- 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $34.00; 2nd $23.00; U1400 $15.00

Parable Of The Good Chess Player

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 27, 2018 at 7:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


Good evening, my fellow chess players. 


One month and five days ago, in a moment of tragedy and trauma, the duties of this office fell upon me.  I asked then for your help, and God’s that we might continue Colorado chess on its course binding up our wounds, healing our history, moving forward in new unity to clear the chess agenda and to keep the chess commitment for all of our players.  United we have kept that commitment.  And united we have enlarged that commitment.  And through all time to come, I think chess will be a stronger sport, a more just activity, a hobby of greater opportunity and fulfilment because of what we have all done together in this month of unparalleled achievement:


1.  I have written a new chess parable:


A tournament director (TD) was going down from Colorado Springs to St. Louis, when he was attacked by a disgruntled chess player.  She stripped him of his clothes and beat him with a club!!  A Monk happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the TD, he passed by on the other side.  So too, a Secretary in the Army, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side.  But a Good Chess Player, as he traveled, came where the TD was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him.  He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine.  Then he put the TD on his own donkey, brought him to the 2018 Sinquefield Cup and took care of him.  The next day the TD had recovered.  ‘What!!?,’ he said, ‘you're not going to pay the entry fee too!!?’


2. I have created a new chess variant:


Covington Random Chess

  • No rules about how the pieces are set up
  • No rules about how the pieces move & capture
  • Winner is determined by who resigns first
  • Any dispute is settled by the TD claiming both players are wrong and punishing no one
  • All prizes are $3.00


3.  I have found this new chess tactic:


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205287315


With chess players in the clubs far away, with chess players’ future under challenge right here at home, with our hopes and the world’s hopes for peace in the balance every day, I do not believe that I should devote an hour or a day of my time to any personal partisan causes or to any duties other than the awesome duties of this office: the vice presidency of your association.


Accordingly, I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my association for another term as your Vice President.


Thank you for listening. Good night and God bless all of you.


Parable Of The Good Chess Player

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=113053


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Site "Colorado Springs"]

[Date "2018.08.21"]

[Round "3.3"]

[White "Parker, Justin"]

[Black "Bridle, Sam"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B08"]

[WhiteElo "1"]

[BlackElo "1826"]

[PlyCount "75"]

[EventDate "2018.08.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 Nc6 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 g6 5. Bc4

Bg7 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 O-O 8. O-O g5 9. Bg3 Bg4 10. Be2 Nh5 11. Ne1 Nxg3 12. hxg3

Bxe2 13. Nxe2 f5 14. c3 Kh8 15. d5 Ne5 16. exf5 c5 17. dxc6 Nxc6 18. g4 Qb6 19.

Nf3 Ne5 20. Ned4 Nxg4 21. Nxg5 Nf6 22. Nge6 Rf7 23. Qe2 Kh7 24. Rad1 Rg8 25.

Rd3 Bf8 26. Rh3 Qa5 27. Qe3 Ng4 28. Qf4 Qe5 29. Ng5+ Rxg5 30. Qxg5 Qg7 31. Ne6

Qg8 32. f3 Ne5 33. Kf2 Rf6 34. f4 Nd7 35. Qg3 Rxf5 36. Nxf8+ Qxf8 37. Qd3 Kg6

38. g4 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 21st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the August Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1989 W13 W2 W6 3.0

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1893 W11 L1 W7 2.0

3 Ayush Vispute 1362 L9 W8 W12 2.0

4 Justin Parker unr. L7 W14 W10 2.0

5 Peter Barlay 1931 W14 D6 U--- 1.5

6 Mark McGough 1855 W12 D5 L1 1.5

7 Michael Smith II 1635 W4 D10 L2 1.5

8 Scott Ch Williams 1246 H--- L3 W14 1.5

9 Laurence Rob Wutt 1948 W3 U--- U--- 1.0

10 Sam Bridle 1826 H--- D7 L4 1.0

11 Joey Arispe 1140 L2 D12 U--- 0.5

12 Grayson Ed Harris 1111 L6 D11 L3 0.5

13 William Leo Wolf 1515 L1 U--- U--- 0.0

14 Clinton D Eads 1268 L5 L4 L8 0.0

Rook Sac Guy

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 20, 2018 at 6:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Round 2 of the Colorado Springs Chess Club's August Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30) and Round 6 of this year's match-ups with Brian Rountree.  We have faced-off in February (regular), April (quick), twice in May (regular), July (quick), and now in August (regular).  He is my most common opponent in the past year (+8-1=0). 


It is getting harder to beat him consistently.  I have to throw everything I have at him plus the kitchen sink.  Fortunately, I have found that throwing my Rook at him works the best. 


In the past three games with Brian, I have used a Rook Sacrifice to win the game.  Sometimes it is a good move.  During the second May match-up, I found myself in this position.


White to move



I played 28.Rxh7+ Kxh7 29.Rh3# for a nice finish.


However, sometimes it is a bad move.  During the July matchup, we were playing with a quick time-control, and I didn't have enough time to work out my second attempt to sacrifice my Rook in two games against Brian.  I figured I had to go for it but missed the Only-Move that refuted my choice.  Fortunately, Brian missed it too, and I was 2-for-2 on my Rook Sacrifices versus Brian.


My third chance to sacrifice my Rook came in our third straight meeting.  This time I had the knowledge that I had been right one time and wrong the other time.  The time I was wrong was a quick game, and I had the safety net of time pressure.  This time we were back to turtle mode, and Brian is the Master Turtle.


Would it work?


White to move



See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205273381


Rook Sac Guy

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=113037


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.08.14"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Rountree, Brian"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A23"]

[WhiteElo "1989"]

[BlackElo "1893"]

[PlyCount "75"]

[EventDate "2018.08.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. g3 c6 4. Bg2 Bb4 5. a3

Bxc3 6. dxc3 d6 7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O Qe7 9. Qc2 Be6 10. b3 h6 11. Bb2 Nbd7 12.

Rfd1 Ne8 13. Nh4 Qf6 14. a4 g5 15. Nf3 Bf5 16. Qd2 Nc5 17. Ra3 Rd8 18. b4 Ne6

19. Qe3 b6 20. Nd2 d5 21. cxd5 cxd5 22. Nf3 Be4 23. c4 Bxf3 24. Bxf3 d4 25. Qc1

Nd6 26. c5 bxc5 27. bxc5 Rc8 28. c6 Nf5 29. Qc4 Nd8 30. Rc1 Ne7 31. Qa6 Ndxc6

32. Rb3 Qe6 33. Rb7 e4 34. Bg2 Nd5 35. Ba3 Rfe8 36. Bh3 Qxh3 37. Rxc6 e3 38.

Rg6+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 14th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the August Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1989 W13 W6 2.0

2 Peter Barlay 1931 W14 D3 1.5

3 Mark McGough 1855 W12 D2 1.5

4 Michael Smith II 1635 W9 D7 1.5

5 Laurence Rob Wutt 1948 W8 U--- 1.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1893 W11 L1 1.0

7 Sam Bridle 1826 H--- D4 1.0

8 Ayush Vispute 1362 L5 W10 1.0

9 Justin Parker unr. L4 W14 1.0

10 Scott Ch Williams 1246 H--- L8 0.5

11 Joey Arispe 1140 L6 D12 0.5

12 Grayson Ed Harris 1111 L3 D11 0.5

13 William Leo Wolf 1515 L1 U--- 0.0

14 Clinton D Eads 1268 L2 L9 0.0


Shirley Herman Hearing


The CSCA Board has released the following letter to notify Shirley Herman of the upcoming hearing:


August 17, 2018


Mrs. Herman,


On July 23, 2018, the Board of Directors for the Colorado State Chess Association (CSCA) voted to have a hearing to investigate if any violation of the CSCA Code of Conduct occurred by you while a member of the CSCA.  The Board received complaints from members, chess clubs, tournament directors, and event organizers.


The hearing will take place at 3 pm on Saturday, August 25, 2018:


East Library

Meeting room E1

5550 N. Union Blvd.

Colorado Springs, CO 80918


You have the right to attend the hearing and to call witnesses on your behalf.


The nature of the complaints alleges a pattern of behavior unbecoming a member of the CSCA in regards to Article III, Section 4 of the CSCA By-Laws.  I have broken the Code of Conduct in to three parts:


  • Chess players and observers will treat each other, tournament directors, and event organizers with the utmost respect.
  • Will not engage in any form of un-sportsmanlike conduct.
  • Uncivil conduct to include any form of behavior disruptive to the chess playing environment.


The written letter of complaint received by the Board can be provided upon request.


Sincerely,

Earle P. Wikle, President of the CSCA


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