Colorado Springs Chess News

The Knights Are Better Here!

Newsletters

My name is Paul Anderson, and I began the newsletter on March 1, 2004 as a way for me to receive and distribute any last minute schedule changes about local chess events and to put to use the analysis and publishing features of my Fritz 8.

However, I soon realized that I liked reporting on the results of my local club and adding some humorous comments about the games I was publishing.  So, during my chess season (typically February to August) the newsletter will contain at least a couple of articles from me (This Week In Chess and Game Of The Week). 

Every now and then, I will receive chess news, chess games, or other chess stuff from my readers, which I am more than happy to include, as I think it makes for a better newsletter.  It doesn’t matter where you are from or what the news is about (as long as it is about chess); you are welcome to contribute.

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40 Move Challenge

Posted by Paul Anderson on October 8, 2020 at 10:30 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Honorary Medal Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Jose Llacza and Paul Anderson.


I picked this game to publish because it was the end of my 40 move challenge.  Sort of.


The 40 Move Challenge is a LM Brian Wall creation.  He may have written about the history and rules in his emails.  However, since Yahoo! killed their archive of his emails, it is hard to find any details about things he has written online.  I did run across his book, How To Play Chess Like An Animal, on Amazon, which has increased in value dramatically.  I may have to start an account and sell my copy as the paperback is currently listed for:  2 Used from $902.81, and 1 New from $809.67!


Without the actual rules for the 40 Move Challenge, I just did my own thing in the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Sunday Night Corona Olympics. 


We meet every Sunday Night at 7pm Mountain on Chess.com for a couple hours since the Coronavirus has shuttered the physical location.  I never thought we'd be closed this long and needed something to amuse myself.  The 40 Move Challenge seemed just like the remedy for my quarantine hangover.


My goal was to play all 40 possible opening moves for White and Black before my chess blogging season ended.  I failed.


My 40 Move Challenge


Move Result

A3 0.5

A4 1.0

B3 1.0

B4 0.5

C3 1.0

C4 0.5

D3 0.0

D3 1.0

D4 1.0

D4 0.0

E3 1.0

E4 0.0

F3 1.0

F4 0.0

G3 1.0

G4 1.0

H3 0.0

H4 1.0

Na3 0.0

Nc3 0.5

Nf3 0.0

Nh3 0.0

A6 1.0

A5 0.0

B6 0.0

B5 1.0

C6 1.0

C5 0.5

D6 1.0

D5 0.0

E6 1.0

E5 1.0

F6 0.0

F5 1.0

G6 1.0

G5 1.0

H6 0.0

H5 1.0

Na6 DNP

Nc6 DNP

Nf6 DNP

Nh6 DNP


I just made a list of all the moves and tried to play them in order.  This is difficult when you are on the b5 opening and your opponent plays 1. e4.  So, I skipped a couple moves here and there, and came back to them when I could.


Another problem was we didn't always get 4 rounds for our events, and I came up 2 games short of my goal.  I also got paired as White 22 times versus 16 times as Black.  So, I replayed 2 White openings I lost (winning the second time) and didn't play any Black Knight openings.


I scored 22.5 points out of 38 games for a winning percentage of 59.21%.  However, I was surprised to see where the wins came from.  I did the best with Black's King Pawns (75%) and worst with the Knight openings (12.50%).


The challenge made the online events more interesting, as I had to focus from move one, and it was thrilling to finally get to play b5 and g5 without being down a Pawn (and winning too).


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206318741


40 Move Challenge

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115844


[Event "CSCC Honorary Medal Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.09.27"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Llacza, Jose"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A10"]

[WhiteElo "1686"]

[BlackElo "1647"]

[PlyCount "100"]

[EventDate "2020.09.27"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. c4 g5 2. Nc3 Bg7 3. d4 h6 4. e4 d6 5. Be3 Nd7 6. Bd3 Ngf6 7. h3 b6 8. Nge2

Bb7 9. Qc2 e5 10. d5 Nc5 11. Bxc5 bxc5 12. Qa4+ Qd7 13. Qb3 Rb8 14. Qc2 a5 15.

O-O O-O 16. a3 Nh5 17. Qd2 Nf4 18. Nxf4 exf4 19. f3 Bd4+ 20. Kh2 Qe7 21. Nb5

Be5 22. Rab1 Ra8 23. a4 Rfb8 24. b3 Ba6 25. Nc3 Qf6 26. Nb5 Bxb5 27. cxb5 Bc3

28. Qe2 Qe5 29. Kh1 Kg7 30. Qc2 Bb4 31. Bc4 Rf8 32. Rfd1 f5 33. exf5 Rxf5 34.

Bd3 Rf6 35. Be4 Re8 36. Qd3 h5 37. Qe2 Rh6 38. Kg1 Kf6 39. Qb2 g4 40. Qxe5+

Rxe5 41. hxg4 hxg4 42. Kf2 g3+ 43. Ke2 Rh2 44. Rh1 Reh5 45. Rxh2 Rxh2 46. Rg1

Bc3 47. Rb1 Rxg2+ 48. Kd3 Bb4 49. Rh1 Rd2+ 50. Kc4 Rd4# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On October 4th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held our Sunday Night Online Event.


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/arena/cscc-second-time-blitz-arena-516132


Place, CSCC Second Time Blitz Arena, Score


1 "#1 Termenoil (2353)" 31

2 "#2 bozhenoff (1916)" 11

3 "#3 jfoxhoot (1567)" 7

4 "#4 msmcgough (1433)" 6

Honorary Medal

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 25, 2020 at 5:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Other Side Rapid Online (3SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Rhett Langseth and Alayne Wilinsky.


Rhett was nice enough to test out the online tournament's re-entry feature.  The question was:  Can players withdraw from the event and then re-enter the event when they are available again?  The answer is:  Maybe.


Perhaps it might work in larger events.  However, the computer limits the number of late entrants an event can have based on the number of players in the first round.  So, our small event may have exceeded our allotment of late entrants.  If the computer considers re-entries the same as late entrants, then it would deny a re-entry because all late entries had been used.  Or it just denies re-entries all together.  Who knows?  At least, it is clear there is no guarantee.


Alayne was nice enough to give Rhett the draw and the bronze.  She survived his tactical shots and had the better endgame.  However, she chose to repeat the position rather than push on for the win.  I can understand her choice since I thought I had a draw against Rhett until I moved into a Knight Fork and hung my Rook.


I felt bad when I beat Alayne in the final round and she lost out on the bronze medal by tie breaks.  I think I saw it was her birthday from my weekly visit to facebook, and after collecting my 6th silver medal, I realized I could have been more generous by not playing my usual, brilliant openings and give her a shot at her first medal in our Corona Chess Olympics.


So, the Game Of The Week's prize goes to Alayne Wilinsky for creating this position. 


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206308894


Honorary Medal

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115809


[Event "CSCC Other Side Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.09.20"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "Langseth, Rhett"]

[Black "Wilinsky, Alayne"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "A04"]

[WhiteElo "1888"]

[BlackElo "1356"]

[PlyCount "190"]

[EventDate "2020.09.20"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]


1. Nf3 f5 2. d3 Nf6 3. Nbd2 g6 4. c3 Bg7 5. e4 fxe4 6. dxe4 d6 7. Qb3 e6 8. e5

dxe5 9. Bc4 Nd5 10. Ne4 O-O 11. Bg5 Qd7 12. O-O-O Nc6 13. Bxd5 exd5 14. Rxd5

Qe6 15. Rhd1 Kh8 16. Bd8 Qf5 17. Neg5 h6 18. h4 hxg5 19. hxg5 Qf4+ 20. Kb1 Bf5+

21. Ka1 Nxd8 22. Rh1+ Bh6 23. Rxh6+ Kg7 24. Qd1 Nf7 25. Rh4 Bg4 26. Qh1 Nxg5

27. Nxg5 Qxg5 28. Rh7+ Kf6 29. Rxc7 Rad8 30. Rcc5 Rxd5 31. Rxd5 Ke6 32. c4 Rxf2

33. Qe1 Qf4 34. Rxe5+ Qxe5 35. Qxf2 Bf5 36. a3 Qe4 37. Ka2 Qb1+ 38. Kb3 Bc2+

39. Kc3 Bf5 40. b3 a5 41. Qb6+ Ke5 42. Qxa5+ Kf4 43. Qc7+ Kg5 44. Qe7+ Kg4 45.

Qe2+ Kg5 46. Qe3+ Kf6 47. Qd4+ Kg5 48. Qd2+ Kf6 49. g3 Qa1+ 50. Kb4 Qe5 51. Qf2

Kg5 52. Qf3 Qd6+ 53. Kc3 Qe5+ 54. Kb4 Qd6+ 55. c5 Qd4+ 56. Kb5 Bd7+ 57. Kb6 Bc6

58. Qf8 Kh5 59. b4 Qd3 60. Qh8+ Kg5 61. Qh4+ Kf5 62. Qf4+ Ke6 63. Qg5 Qb5+ 64.

Kc7 Qd3 65. Kb6 Qb5+ 66. Kc7 Qd3 67. Qg4+ Ke7 68. Kb6 Qb5+ 69. Kc7 Qd3 70. Kb8

Qd8+ 71. Ka7 Qd3 72. Qg5+ Kf7 73. Qf4+ Ke7 74. Qe5+ Kf7 75. Qc7+ Kf6 76. Qf4+

Ke7 77. Qg4 Qxa3+ 78. Kb6 Qa6+ 79. Kc7 Qd3 80. Kb6 Qb5+ 81. Kc7 Qd3 82. Qg5+

Kf7 83. Qf4+ Ke7 84. Qe5+ Kf7 85. Qf4+ Ke7 86. Qe5+ Kf7 87. Kb8 Qd8+ 88. Ka7

Qd3 89. Kb6 Qb5+ 90. Kc7 Qxb4 91. Qd6 Qa5+ 92. Kc8 Qa8+ 93. Kc7 Qa5+ 94. Kc8

Qa8+ 95. Kc7 Qa5+ 1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On September 20th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held our Sunday Night Online Event.


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-other-side-rapid-online-1582062


Place, CSCC Other Side Rapid Online, Score


1 "#1 Czechmate1972 (1658)" 3.0

2 "#2 cschessnews (1608)" 2.0

3 "#3 Termenoil (1848)" 1.5

4 "#4 alaynew (1352)" 1.5

5 "#5 jfoxhoot (1590)" 1.0

6 "#6 KingVed (1457)" 0.0

7 "- Wazzat (1967)" 1.0

8 "- bazinga2 (1582)" 0.0

9 "- bestatcheckers7 (1594)" 0.0

On The Other Side

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 17, 2020 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Full Commitment Rapid Online (3SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Thomas Claman and Mark McGough.


I always start my weekly newsletter with the same introduction because starting on an empty page can be too daunting to overcome.


The empty page before me now, the pen is in my hand

The words don't come so easy but I'm trying

I'm searching for a melody or some forgotten line

They can slip away from us so quickly

Don't be unkind I'm not complaining

I only feel it needs explaining


Kansas, 1979


Kansas is tied for 59th in my favorite music artists list.  I was exposed to Kansas songs from listening to the radio on my family car trips from Chicago to California, much like the Griswold's family vacation:  "This is no longer a vacation. It's a quest. It's a quest for fun."  My apologies to Kansas for not listening to more of your albums.


Kansas is also one of the states I need in my quest to spend a night in all 50 States, since we would bypass Kansas and drive through Nebraska to see the second largest ball of twine on the face of the earth, which was only four short hours away.  I can't remember ever spending the night in the state.  My apologies to the state of Kansas if I have forgotten.


Kansas is also the home to a new player in our Sunday Night events, Thomas Claman.  He joined late and filled in for me after I got knocked offline.  He asked a question on the event chat and may not have received an answer.  My apologies to Thomas Claman of Kansas for not getting back to you.


Kansas is also the home to another player in our Sunday Night events, Laurence Coker. He was playing me when I got knocked offline and may have had to wait until I flagged to get the win.  My apologies to Laurence Coker of Kansas for not having a better internet provider.


On the other side, I hope Mark McGough is happy that I picked one of his wins to publish this week, even though he missed the same move twice when it could have won material but found it the third time when it was just positional strong.  Here is strike two before Mark knocked it out of the park.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206303173


On The Other Side

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115773


[Event "CSCC Full Commitment Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.09.13"]

[Round "3.4"]

[White "Claman, Thomas"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A47"]

[WhiteElo "1342"]

[BlackElo "1495"]

[PlyCount "66"]

[EventDate "2020.09.13"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 b6 3. e3 Bb7 4. Bd3 d6 5. O-O Nbd7 6. Nbd2 e5 7. c3 Be7 8.

dxe5 dxe5 9. Re1 O-O 10. Bc2 c5 11. Nc4 Qc7 12. Bf5 Rad8 13. Qc2 e4 14. Ng5 Ne5

15. Nd2 Nd3 16. Re2 Qe5 17. Bxh7+ Nxh7 18. Nxh7 Kxh7 19. Nf1 c4 20. b3 b5 21.

a4 a6 22. Ba3 Bxa3 23. Rxa3 Rd6 24. bxc4 bxc4 25. Qa2 Bd5 26. Nd2 Nc1 27. Qb2

Nxe2+ 28. Kf1 Qxh2 29. Kxe2 Qxg2 30. Qb4 Rfd8 31. Nxc4 Qf3+ 32. Ke1 Bxc4 33.

Qxc4 Rd1# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On September 13th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held our Sunday Night Online Event.


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-full-commitment-rapid-online-1568186


Place, CSCC Full Commitment Rapid Online, Score


1 "#1 Termenoil (1904)" 3.0

2 "#2 linuxguy1 (1774)" 2.0

3 "#3 jfoxhoot (1607)" 2.0

4 "#4 bazinga2 (1618)" 2.0

5 "#5 Czechmate1972 (1615)" 1.0

6 "#6 alaynew (1316)" 1.0

7 "#6 msmcgough (1495)" 1.0

8 "#8 cschessnews (1594)" 0.0

9 "#8 Thunder_Knight (1339)" 0.0

Full Commitment

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 11, 2020 at 5:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Andy Rea


[editor:  This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Illegal Landing Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Andy Rea and DuWayne Langseth and actually comes from one of the players!]


It is not the best of form to nominate oneself for Game Of The Week, but I think my Round 3 win against DuWayne Langseth was fairly interesting and entertaining.  Not to be confused with sound, but then, I had sound and mundane and ordinary, think boring, in Rounds 1, 2, and 4.  The win in Round 3 also proved vital in winning the Illegal Sunday tournament!


I had White.


1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c4 f5 4.Bf4 Bd6 5.Bxd6 Qxd6 6.Nc3 c6 7.cd ed 8.e3 Nd7 9.Be2 Ngf6 10.0-0 0-0 11.Qc2 Ne4


So far so good for Black.  The trend has him hitting Kingside while White is able to spectate and observe.


12.Rac1 Rf6 13.a3 Rh6 14.g3 Qg6


This has gotten serious.  It's as though Black is trying to win!   I spent a fair amount of time, considering its G/10, trying to find something sturdy and steely.  That sometimes works, as happened in Round 4.  Here though, Black is able to keep hitting the White King.  So, time to change the subject, even though the price is wrong!


15.Nxd5 cd 16.Qxc8+


Full commitment, for better or worse!


16...Rxc8 17.Rxc8+ Nf8


Black passes the first test, not allowing the annoying forkly pinly.


17...Kf7 18.Rc7. 18.Ne5 Qe6 19.Rd8


The whole idea is that if Black is not allowing himself to get bagged on the back ranks, then Be2 has to do something.  But there is good news:  Black is not attacking!  Sure, Black could play 19...Nd6 20.Rc1, there's still some fun stuff for White.  Albeit probably not ending well, but it would be interesting!  The really nice news is that Black doesn't play 19...f4 20.ef Qh3 21.Nf3 Nd2, reminding White that there is more than one King on the board...


19...Qe7? 20.Rxd5 Rd6


Black saves his King but I could hardly have done a better job of stopping his attack!  True, objectively Black is better, but White has plenty of potshots lurking out there, and for now Kg1 is not completely stressed out.


21.Rb5 a6 22.Rb4 Qc7 23.Bc4+


Turns out Black does not get the c-file after all.  This miscalculation very much keeps White alive if not still fully well.


23...Ne6 24.Rc1 Kf8 25.Nd3 Rc6


This looks bad but turns out to not be awful.


26.d5 Rd6 27.Bxa6 Qd8 28.Bxb7


Here, yes, Black cannot be a fan of Rc8xd8... but, there were other squares for the Queen.   Black is also nervous about an ending where White has 2 connected Queenside passers rendering an extra Black piece fairly harmless.   Anyway, I trust that our readers can find better than Blacks unfortunate choice.  Not that this is so easy when the players are in time pressure right from move 1 on!


28...Qf6? 29.de Rxd3 30.Bxe4 fe 31.Re4


And White's pieces have stumbled into the endzone, shades of The Man From New York Life, as our older readers may recall... In any event, trying to save this as Black with not a lot of time, best wishes.


31...Ke7 32.Rc7+ Ke8 33.e7 Qf5 34.Rf4 Rd1+ 35.Kg2 Qd5+ 36.e4


Some 4-5 moves ago I was down to 17 seconds, but the increment was helpful.   Black also was inside the last minute, and as happens in these time shortages, the mistakes on defense are more brutal, per previous note.   I am not seeing any escape here for Black.


36...Qg8 37.Rc8+ Kxe7 38.Rxg8


And here Black did not see any need to test White's endgame technique. 1-0


DuWayne has been playing well against me previously.  I am glad to finally get a win and to then win the final round to win the tournament, always a good deal, worth more than the price of admission! 


Postscript:  It can also be fairly observed DuWayne would have concerns about ...f5-f4 getting hit by Be2-g4.  I might have made it seem like he missed an obvious defense when that is not the case.  The chips were falling well for me that game.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206299017


Full Commitment 

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115754

 

[Event "CSCC Illegal Landing Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.09.06"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Rea, Andy"]

[Black "Langseth, DuWayne"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D30"]

[WhiteElo "1644"]

[BlackElo "1591"]

[PlyCount "75"]

[EventDate "2020.09.06"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 f5 4. Bf4 Bd6 5. Bxd6 Qxd6 6. Nc3 c6 7. cxd5 exd5 8.

e3 Nd7 9. Be2 Ngf6 10. O-O O-O 11. Qc2 Ne4 12. Rac1 Rf6 13. a3 Rh6 14. g3 Qg6

15. Nxd5 cxd5 16. Qxc8+ Rxc8 17. Rxc8+ Nf8 18. Ne5 Qe6 19. Rd8 Qe7 20. Rxd5 Rd6

21. Rb5 a6 22. Rb4 Qc7 23. Bc4+ Ne6 24. Rc1 Kf8 25. Nd3 Rc6 26. d5 Rd6 27. Bxa6

Qd8 28. Bxb7 Qf6 29. dxe6 Rxd3 30. Bxe4 fxe4 31. Rxe4 Ke7 32. Rc7+ Ke8 33. e7

Qf5 34. Rf4 Rd1+ 35. Kg2 Qd5+ 36. e4 Qg8 37. Rc8+ Kd7 38. Rxg8 1-0


This Week In Chess


On September 6th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Illegal Landing Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-illegal-landing-rapid-online-1553866


Place, CSCC Illegal Landing Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 dzhierkiev64 (1866)" 3.5

2 "#2 msmcgough (1507)" 3.0

3 "#3 DuWayneL (1569)" 2.0

4 "#4 Czechmate1972 (1627)" 2.0

5 "#5 jfoxhoot (1600)" 2.0

6 "#6 Termenoil (1860)" 1.0

7 "#7 SHerman2 (1008)" 1.0

8 "#8 linuxguy1 (1420)" 0.5

9 "- Honeybrook (1350)" 1.0

10 "- cschessnews (1614)" 0.0

The Illegal Has Landed

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 3, 2020 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Knight Pair Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10). It was played by John Brezina and Rhett Langseth.


I was looking for a game to publish this week and noticed that LM Brian Wall had published his 200,000th email with his loss to Rhett Langseth in round 4 of our Sunday night event.  I figured that Rhett had won the tournament and that his upset would be a great choice for the Game Of The Week.


However, I was surprised to see that Brian got the gold, as Rhett suffered an upset as well.  I didn't actually see the results until the day after, as I was in Denver trying to get my 2004 Toyota Highlander over 200,000 miles.  We drove to Illegal Burger to get the last 17 miles done and get a burger with a hotdog on it!  It was as dramatic as the moon landing.  In fact, Neil Armstrong drove the lunar module 200,000 miles to the Sea of Tranquility and ended with 17 seconds of fuel left as he delayed the landing just long enough to get the odometer to read exactly 200,000!




Well, as I looked at both upsets, I was more impressed with John Brezina's clever defense than Brian's stumble in the Rhetti. 


I have played John once over the board and once online, both at G/10!  The time we played over the board was in the 2013 COLORADO QUICK CHESS CHAMPIONS.  We tied with 3.0 and were a half point behind Rhett Langseth.  Despite being the Quick Championship, it was the first time I got a USCF Blitz rating.


John needed the upset to stay ahead of Rhett in the Corona Chess Olympics medal count.  John is battling Jeff Fox for domination of the bronze medals and is currently in 4th on the overall medal count with 5 total, just ahead of Rhett with 3 total.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206292252


The Illegal Has Landed

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115731


[Event "CSCC Knight Pair Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.08.30"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Brezina, John"]

[Black "Langseth, Rhett"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C41"]

[WhiteElo "1624"]

[BlackElo "1809"]

[PlyCount "97"]

[EventDate "2020.08.30"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. Nf3 e5 5. d5 Be7 6. Bb5 O-O 7. O-O a6 8. Be2

Re8 9. h3 Nf8 10. Nh2 Ng6 11. Be3 Bd7 12. f3 Qc8 13. Rc1 Nh5 14. Qe1 Nhf4 15.

Bxf4 Nxf4 16. Bd3 Qd8 17. Ne2 Bh4 18. Qd1 Bxh3 19. Nxf4 exf4 20. gxh3 Bg3 21.

Qe2 Re5 22. Ng4 Rh5 23. Kg2 Rh4 24. Rh1 g6 25. e5 Qe7 26. e6 f5 27. Nf2 Qg5 28.

Kf1 Qh5 29. e7 Re8 30. Qe6+ Kg7 31. Qd7 Qxf3 32. Rh2 Kf7 33. Qe6+ Kg7 34. Qd7

Rxe7 35. Qxe7+ Kh6 36. Bxf5 Rh5 37. Bg4 Qxd5 38. Bxh5 Kxh5 39. Qxh7+ Kg5 40.

h4+ Kf5 41. Qd7+ Ke5 42. Re1+ Kd4 43. Rd1+ Kc4 44. Rxd5 Bxh2 45. Rd3 f3 46.

Qxc7+ Kb4 47. Rb3+ Ka4 48. Qxb7 a5 49. Qc6# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 30th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Knight Pair Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-knight-pair-rapid-online-1539299


Place, CSCC Knight Pair Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 NM BrianWall (1959)" 3.0

2 "#2 Termenoil (1855)" 3.0

3 "#3 Czechmate1972 (1639)" 3.0

4 "#4 jfoxhoot (1620)" 3.0

5 "#5 DuWayneL (1564)" 2.0

6 "#6 bazinga2 (1516)" 2.0

7 "#7 linuxguy1 (1435)" 1.0

8 "#8 alaynew (1334)" 1.0

9 "- tanguay1 (704)" 1.0

10 "- SHerman2 (1016)" 0.0

11 "- JJ7X (1704)" 0.0

12 "- KingVed (1464)" 0.0

Beware The Knight Pair

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 26, 2020 at 8:10 PM Comments comments (1)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Memorable Upsets Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).   It was played by Brian Rountree and Laurence Coker.


One of the nice things about these online tournaments is that I am running into players I haven't played in years.  I hadn't played Andy Rea since 2007.  Now, I got to play Laurence Coker again.  We played once in 2002 at the Southern Colorado Open when I won my largest prize ($120.00, Class B).


This time it was another close battle that went into an endgame.  Since we were the longest game of the round, our game was the interest of several spectators.


Another nice thing about these online tournaments is that you can view others players' games and even play "Guess The Move."  I have yet to try guessing other player's moves but when my game ends, I get the results of who guessed my moves.

 

TOP GUESSERS OUT OF 4:


#1 alaynew (1320) 4/5

#2 jfoxhoot (1572) 3/10

#3 lifeofacoomer (800) 1/1

#4 Aeqetes (1316) 1/2


I guess I need to watch out for alaynew!  She is on to my way of thinking.


In the next round, Laurence played Brian.  When he told me that his game had a puzzle position with 2 Knights, I had to check it out.  As a guy who uses 2 Knights in my Kissing Knights logo, I get a kick out of Knight positions.  Any time during my game, when I get the Knights to land on squares next to each other, I make sure they are facing each other and annotate the move with a heart on my score sheet!

 

Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206286629

 

Beware The Knight Pair

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115713

 

[Event "CSCC Memorable Upsets Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.08.23"]

[Round "3.5"]

[White "Rountree, Brian"]

[Black "Coker, Laurence"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "B27"]

[WhiteElo "1475"]

[BlackElo "1462"]

[PlyCount "138"]

[EventDate "2020.08.23"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qd8 5. Bc4 e6 6. O-O Nf6 7. d4 cxd4 8.

Qxd4 Qxd4 9. Nxd4 a6 10. Be3 Be7 11. a4 O-O 12. a5 Bd7 13. Na4 Bxa4 14. Rxa4

Nbd7 15. b4 Rac8 16. Bd3 Ne5 17. Be2 Nc4 18. Bf4 e5 19. Nf5 Bd8 20. Bg3 Nb2 21.

Ra2 Rxc2 22. Bf3 e4 23. Bd1 Rd2 24. Bf4 Rxd1 25. Rxd1 Nxd1 26. Rc2 b6 27. Bd2

bxa5 28. bxa5 g6 29. Ng3 e3 30. fxe3 Ng4 31. Nf1 Bg5 32. e4 Bxd2 33. Rxd2 Nc3

34. Rd6 Nxe4 35. Rxa6 Rb8 36. h3 Nh6 37. Ne3 Nc5 38. Rb6 Rxb6 39. axb6 Nb7 40.

Kf2 Kf8 41. Nc4 Ke7 42. Ke3 Kd7 43. g4 f5 44. gxf5 Nxf5+ 45. Kf4 Ne7 46. Kg5 h5

47. Ne5+ Kd6 48. Nxg6 Nxg6 49. Kxg6 h4 50. Kg5 Ke6 51. Kxh4 Kf6 52. Kg4 Kg6 53.

Kf4 Kh5 54. Ke5 Kh4 55. Kd5 Kxh3 56. Kc6 Na5+ 57. Kb5 Nb7 58. Ka6 Nc5+ 59. Kb5

Nb7 60. Kc6 Na5+ 61. Kc7 Kg4 62. Kb8 Kf5 63. Ka7 Ke6 64. Ka6 Nc6 65. b7 Kd7 66.

Kb6 Nb8 67. Ka7 Nc6+ 68. Ka8 Kc7 69. b8=Q+ Nxb8 1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On August 23rd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Memorable Upsets Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-memorable-upsets-rapid-online-1524931


Place, CSCC Memorable Upsets (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 jfoxhoot (1605)" 4.0

2 "#2 cschessnews (1633)" 3.0

3 "#3 DuWayneL (1560)" 2.5

4 "#4 dzhierkiev64 (1613)" 2.5

5 "#5 Czechmate1972 (1598)" 2.5

6 "#6 alaynew (1360)" 2.0

7 "#7 Aeqetes (1336)" 2.0

8 "#8 linuxguy1 (1451)" 1.5

9 "#8 msmcgough (1464)" 1.5

10 "#10 bazinga2 (1409)" 1.5

11 "- tristancruz (1072)" 1.0

12 "#11 CosmicNovaGalaxy (1319)" 1.0

13 "- KingVed (1464)" 1.0

My 60 Memorable Upsets

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 19, 2020 at 8:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my list of upsets.  In fact, it is my 60th upset I have published.  I created the list early on when I had limited access to other player's chess games, and I wanted an easy way to pick one of my games to publish for the newsletter.


I just filtered my database for games where my estimated rating change was +16 or higher.  I also had to remove the duplicates, as the Colorado Springs Chess Club had its own rating for a while and the USCF rates some time controls as dual-rated.  So, most of the games are standard time control of G/30 or longer, with the exception of a couple of quick-rated events at G/24+5.


I was surprised to see how few and far between the upsets were.  How did I get my peak USCF rating to 2102 when I rarely beat someone higher rated?  It was kind of a depressing report with drought years in 2018 and 2020 and single digits all over the place. 


But these are the numbers.  And as a stat guy, you learn to face the data head-on.


Year, Upsets


2019 1

2017 2

2016 1

2015 2

2014 2

2013 3

2012 2

2011 1

2010 2

2009 3

2008 2

2007 3

2006 4

2005 3

2004 4

2003 5

2002 2

2001 6

2000 5

1999 2

1998 5


Grand Total 60


The numbers just kept getting worse when I looked at from where my multiple upsets were coming.  My top 2 upset opponents make up 1/3 of all my upsets.  I guess this is what you get when you only play at club.

 

My Opponent, # of Upsets, My Rating, Opp Rating


BUCHANAN 11 1896 2006

FOX, JEFF 9 1636 1759

BLOOMER 5 1933 2228

TELINBACCO 2 1824 1882

HORTILLOSA 2 1666 1936

ANDERSON, ROBERT 2 1534 1556


The only consolation I had was that my numbers are eerily similar to a young chess prodigy, as he was playing at his local club.

 

Bobby's Opponent, # of Upsets, Bobby's Rating, Opp Rating


Bisguier 11 1896 2006

Fox, Maurice 9 1636 1759

Alekhine 5 1933 2228

Tal 2 1824 1882

Hort 2 1666 1936

Byrne, Robert 2 1534 1556


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206280809

 

My 60 Memorable Upsets

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115698

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2019.03.19"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Bloomer, Josh"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E68"]

[WhiteElo "1934"]

[BlackElo "2343"]

[PlyCount "87"]

[EventDate "2019.03.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. O-O

d6 6. c4 Nbd7 7. Nc3 e5 8. e4 c6 9. Be3 Ng4 10. Bc1 exd4 11. Nxd4 Nc5 12. b3

Ne5 13. Nde2 f5 14. Be3 fxe4 15. Bxc5 Nf3+ 16. Kh1 dxc5 17. Qxd8 Rxd8 18. Rad1

Bf5 19. Rxd8+ Rxd8 20. Rd1 Rxd1+ 21. Nxd1 b5 22. Ne3 Be6 23. Nf4 Kf7 24. Nxe6

Kxe6 25. Bh3+ Kd6 26. Bf1 b4 27. Bh3 Bd4 28. Nd1 Nd2 29. Bg4 a5 30. Ne3 Bxe3

31. fxe3 Nxc4 32. bxc4 a4 33. Bd1 b3 34. a3 h5 35. h3 Ke5 36. Kg2 g5 37. Kf2 h4

38. gxh4 gxh4 39. Ke1 Kf5 40. Kd2 Ke5 41. Kc3 Kd6 42. Bg4 Ke5 43. Bd7 Kd6 44.

Be8 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 16th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Owen Nomore Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-owen-nomore-rapid-online-1509808


Place, CSCC Owen Nomore (4SS, G/10+10), Score

 

1 "#1 bozhenoff (1737)" 4.0

2 "#2 Czechmate1972 (1608)" 3.0

3 "#3 jfoxhoot (1563)" 3.0

4 "#4 DuWayneL (1539)" 2.0

5 "#5 cschessnews (1627)" 2.0

6 "#5 tristancruz (1057)" 2.0

7 "#7 KingVed (1479)" 2.0

8 "#8 msmcgough (1468)" 2.0

9 "#9 Navajo36us80917 (1134)" 1.0

10 "- Honeybrook (1344)" 0.0

11 "- RecurringMiss (1889)" 0.0

12 "- Termenoil (1846)" 0.0

Owen Nomore

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 13, 2020 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Recurring Miss Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Paul Anderson and Andy Rea.


I was happy to win this game because Andy has always had my number. 


When you play an opponent 4 times or more and can't even get a draw once, I call you an Owen.  It seems like a humorous way to describe an opponent who is just a bad match-up for you.  It is like they own you.  See, it kind of sounds like Owen.


However, it really came from the knock, knock joke:


Winner:  Knock, knock?

Loser:  Who's there?

Winner:  Owen

Loser:  Owen who?

Winner:  Owen Four!


Well, I am an Owen to Andy;  Owen Seven to be exact.  We played seven times when he was in Colorado and I lost all seven.  He is tied with Renard Anderson as my worst Owen match-up.


However, since it was just a humorous way to look at some chess stats, I didn't work out all the details.  For example, all seven of my losses to Andy were in standard-rated USCF games.  Now that my first win is from a Rapid, online event, can I really claim to be off the Owen list?


Well, I am taking it.  Mainly because, when I used to tell Mike Smith that he was Owen Six, he would say, "I did beat you in that rapid game!"


So, when I got this Mate In 5 against Andy, I just said to him:


Paul:  Knock, knock?

Andy:  Who's there?

Paul:  Owen

Andy:  Owen who?

Paul:  Owen Nomore!


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206276443


Owen Nomore

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115685


[Event "CSCC Recurring Miss Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.08.09"]

[Round "4.2"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Rea, Andy"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A00"]

[WhiteElo "1649"]

[BlackElo "1639"]

[PlyCount "57"]

[EventDate "2020.08.09"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

1. f3 g6 2. e4 Bg7 3. Ne2 d5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. Nbc3 Qd8 6. d3 Nf6 7. Be3 Nc6 8.

Qd2 h5 9. g3 Nd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd5 11. Bg2 Bxb2 12. Rb1 Bg7 13. O-O Qd7 14. f4 Nd4

15. Bxb7 Nxe2+ 16. Qxe2 Bxb7 17. Rxb7 O-O 18. Rfb1 Bd4 19. Qf2 Bb6 20. Qf3 Qa4

21. Bxb6 axb6 22. Rxc7 Qxa2 23. Rxb6 Qa1+ 24. Kg2 Ra2 25. Qe2 e6 26. Rbc6 Qc1

27. Rxe6 Ra1 28. Rxg6+ fxg6 29. Qe6+ 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 9th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Recurring Miss Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-recurring-miss-rapid-online-1494799


Place, CSCC Recurring Miss (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 NM BrianWall (1974)" 3.5

2 "#2 Termenoil (1918)" 3.5

3 "#3 cschessnews (1649)" 3.0

4 "#4 jfoxhoot (1547)" 2.5

5 "#5 outie5000 (1657)" 2.5

6 "#5 Czechmate1972 (1586)" 2.5

7 "#5 DFSStar (2019)" 2.5

8 "#8 JJ7X (1753)" 2.0

9 "#9 dzhierkiev64 (1639)" 2.0

10 "#10 KingVed (1472)" 1.0

11 "#11 linuxguy1 (1471)" 1.0

12 "#11 alaynew (1340)" 1.0

13 "- tristancruz (1035)" 1.0

14 "#13 Navajo36us80917 (1151)" 1.0

15 "#13 SHerman2 (1024)" 1.0

16 "- Aeqetes (1288)" 0.0

Recurring Miss

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 5, 2020 at 7:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Beware The Twelfth Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by NM Jonathan Dussik and DuWayne Langseth. 


DuWayne is a club old-timer and was trying for his first virtual gold medal from our Sunday night events.  Unfortunately, he missed the gold and had to settle for a second silver.  His only loss was to the National Master from Illinois.  Jonathan got his NM certificate in 2016.  He was improving so quickly that he missed the Candidate Master Title until 2 months after he got the NM title.


DuWayne had a shot to win when Jonathan hung a rook, but DuWayne missed it.  Since the online games only show an opponent's username and the sandbagger, rapid rating, DuWayne asked, after his loss, "Who is RecurringMiss?"


So, I looked it up. 


Our club events are open to anyone who can figure out how to join our online club.  I spent a half hour helping Andy Rea navigate the chess.com website when he was looking for the join button but missed it.  He used to play in the Springs in the early 2000s but now resides in Virginia.  He is the player from the farthest away to play in a Colorado Springs Chess Club's online event.


Jonathan might be the 2nd farthest.  He looks to be in Illinois now, but he started playing chess in Arizona.  I am guessing that he was a student of LM Joel Johnson, as Joel is his most common opponent (+13=6-16).  So, Joel might have told him about LM Brian Wall's email list, where I post news of the club, and how he might have found out about our humble club.


DuWayne had another good shot to win, but he missed it.  See if you can find the moves!


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206270943


Recurring Miss

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115666


[Event "CSCC Beware The Twelfth Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.08.02"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "Dussik, Jonathan"]

[Black "Langseth, DuWayne"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "1824"]

[BlackElo "1434"]

[PlyCount "157"]

[EventDate "2020.08.02"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 c6 6. Ne5 Nbd7 7. Nc4 Qc7 8.

g3 Nb6 9. Bf4 Qd8 10. Ne5 Bf5 11. Bg2 Nbd5 12. Nxd5 Nxd5 13. Bd2 e6 14. O-O Be7

15. c4 Nf6 16. Be3 O-O 17. b3 Nd7 18. Nf3 Bf6 19. Rc1 Qa5 20. Qe2 Rfe8 21. Rfd1

Rad8 22. h3 h6 23. Kh2 Qa3 24. Kg1 e5 25. d5 cxd5 26. Rxd5 Be4 27. Rd2 Bc6 28.

Rcd1 b6 29. Nh4 Bxg2 30. Nxg2 Qe7 31. Rd5 Qe6 32. Kh2 Nf8 33. Bc1 Rxd5 34. Rxd5

Rd8 35. Ne3 Bg5 36. Rxd8 Bxd8 37. Nd5 Ng6 38. Bb2 f6 39. Qe4 Ne7 40. Ne3 Qc6

41. Qxc6 Nxc6 42. Nd5 Kf7 43. Kg2 Ke6 44. g4 b5 45. Ne3 bxc4 46. Nxc4 Nb4 47.

a3 Nd3 48. Bc3 Kd5 49. Ne3+ Ke6 50. Nf5 g6 51. Nh4 Bb6 52. Nxg6 Bxf2 53. h4 Bc5

54. b4 Bd4 55. Bxd4 exd4 56. Kf3 Kd5 57. Ne7+ Kc4 58. Nf5 Ne5+ 59. Kf4 d3 60.

Nxh6 d2 61. Nf5 Kd3 62. Ne3 Ng6+ 63. Kf3 Nxh4+ 64. Kf2 Ng2 65. Nd1 Nf4 66. Kf3

Nd5 67. Nf2+ Kc2 68. Ke4 Ne7 69. b5 d1=Q 70. Nxd1 Kxd1 71. a4 Kc2 72. a5 Kc3

73. b6 axb6 74. axb6 Kc4 75. b7 Nc6 76. Kf5 Kd5 77. Kxf6 Kd6 78. g5 Ne5 79.

b8=Q+ 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On August 2nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Beware The Twelfth Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-beware-the-twelfth-rapid-online-1430027


Place, CSCC Beware The Twelfth (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 RecurringMiss (1853)" 4.0

2 "#2 DuWayneL (1538)" 3.0

3 "#3 Czechmate1972 (1570)" 2.5

4 "#4 dzhierkiev64 (1672)" 2.5

5 "#5 jfoxhoot (1520)" 2.0

6 "#5 alaynew (1348)" 2.0

7 "#7 KingVed (1469)" 2.0

8 "#8 cschessnews (1635)" 1.0

9 "#9 msmcgough (1501)" 1.0

10 "#10 damon_achey (1289)" 0.0

11 "- tristancruz (925)" 1.0

Beware The Twelfth

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 29, 2020 at 7:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Blind Turtle Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Alex Bozhenov and Dean Brown.


I was surprised to see Dean in virtual medal contention and tied with my opponent, Jeff Fox, when the 4th round started.  I figured there had to be an upset in one of his first three games, but I was floored to see it was against Alex Bozhenov.


Alex had played in a couple of the Colorado Springs Chess Club's online events and hadn't lost a game.  In his first 12 games of Rapid chess, he won six, drew five, and lost only one.  He had pushed his Rapid rating to his peak from these tournaments on the twelfth:  Highest 1808 (Jul 12, 2020).


Beware the twelfth, for the streak was going to come to an end.  In fact, the rating was going to drop sharply.  In the last 30 days, Alex's online Rapid rating was going to fall nearly a hundred points, and all from one man:  Dean William Brown (Rating change: White -99, Black +47).


Ironically, the Twelfth Of July is also the day the Orange Order celebrates another victory from a different William.


The Battle of the Boyne was fought in Ireland between William of Orange and James II in July 1690.  It was the last time two crowned kings of England, Scotland and Ireland faced each other on the battlefield.  William of Orange won a crushing victory, which secured the Protestant ascendancy in Ireland for generations.


After the battle, William changed his color to Brown while James changed his name and fled the British Isles for Russia.  Their descendants have been waring ever since.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206266250


Beware The Twelfth

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115650

 

[Event "CSCC Blind Turtle Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.07.26"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Black "Brown, Dean"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B20"]

[WhiteElo "1616"]

[BlackElo "1174"]

[PlyCount "70"]

[EventDate "2020.07.26"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. b4 b6 3. b5 a6 4. c4 d6 5. Nc3 g6 6. f4 Bg7 7. Qf3 Bb7 8. Nge2 f5

9. d3 Nf6 10. Rb1 O-O 11. Bd2 Nbd7 12. Ng3 e5 13. a4 exf4 14. Qxf4 Ne5 15. Nd5

fxe4 16. dxe4 Nxd5 17. cxd5 Rxf4 18. Bxf4 Qf6 19. Be3 Rf8 20. Be2 axb5 21. Rxb5

Ba6 22. Rxb6 Bxe2 23. Kxe2 Nc4 24. Rf1 Qxf1+ 25. Nxf1 Nxb6 26. a5 Nc4 27. Bg5

Nxa5 28. Be7 Re8 29. Bxd6 Rxe4+ 30. Kf3 Rd4 31. Ne3 Nb7 32. Bc7 c4 33. g4 c3

34. g5 c2 35. Nxc2 Rc4 0-1


This Week In Chess


On July 26th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Blind Turtle Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-blind-turtle-rapid-online-1354911


Place, CSCC Blind Turtle (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 cschessnews (1696)" 3.0

2 "#2 jfoxhoot (1538)" 2.5

3 "#3 Czechmate1972 (1527)" 2.5

4 "#4 KingVed (1476)" 2.0

5 "#4 msmcgough (1522)" 2.0

6 "#6 bozhenoff (1620)" 2.0

7 "#7 Navajo36us80917 (1166)" 2.0

8 "#8 tristancruz (1002)" 0.0

Two Blind Turtles

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 22, 2020 at 8:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Pin Is Mighty Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).   It was played by DuWayne Langseth and Brian Rountree.


I was looking online for some stats to share about the combatants in this game since they created my favorite position from this week.  I thought I had gone blind.  Every place I looked I couldn't find them together.


I found a cool chart online that had the club's standings for rapid ratings.  Brian was there at number 15, but, my eyes failed me, I couldn't find DuWayne anywhere in the top 24.  My only thought was that since the website starts new players with a rating of 2 and the caps the amount of ratings you can earn from a win at 2, he has yet to catch Dean Brown.


Player Rating Won / Lost / Draw


#1 NM RichardShtivelband 2362 88 / 6 / 6

#2 SmyslovFan 2109 34 / 8 / 10

#3 NM BrianWall 1958 31 / 23 / 10

#4 phatchess 1881 41 / 22 / 5

#5 Termenoil 1848 251 / 183 / 16

#6 JJ7X 1771 23 / 9 / 3

#7 GriffinMac 1768 121 / 89 / 20

#8 cschessnews 1694 29 / 13 / 7

#9 waynehatcher 1687 29 / 18 / 7

#10 geeleong 1661 74 / 53 / 6

#11 RayFchess 1647 13 / 13 / 3

#12 u139054 1608 76 / 58 / 8

#13 msmcgough 1532 18 / 13 / 3

#14 jfoxhoot 1525 15 / 11 / 1

#15 linuxguy1 1483 41 / 36 / 11

#16 KingVed 1471 172 / 186 / 25

#17 albertgardner 1421 393 / 330 / 87

#18 aelvr 1399 62 / 48 / 5

#19 Honeybrook 1340 73 / 77 / 15

#20 CosmicNovaGalaxy 1328 231 / 245 / 21

#21 alaynew 1283 23 / 41 / 7

#22 liencam2 1180 11 / 17 / 0

#23 amauer01 1134 278 / 282 / 27

#24 Navajo36us80917 1110 4 / 29 / 2


Of course, I was able to find out that DuWayne is 0-1 against me in online, rapid games.  Brian is doing much better with 2 wins and 2 losses against me.  However, those trivial stats weren't nearly enough information to pad a blog.


So, I went to USCF.  My eyes must have been deceiving me, but the ratings database was gone.  My tool for easy numbers was nowhere to be found.  Fortunately, the link to the top players in Colorado was still there.  I checked the current members and saw DuWayne at #38, but I didn't see Brian on the list.  Perhaps, his membership has expired.


Anyway, without the comparison stats, I figured I would just use an appropriate quote that connected with the game.  The only thing I could think of was that this position was like two blind turtles passing in the night, as DuWayne's King blindly wondered into the center of the board and Brian's Rook blindly strolled right by.  Can you see it?

 

I guess you were just tryin'

To buy some piece of mind

But baby there's no buyin'

Eyesight for the blind


(Great White, 1992)

 

Black to move

 

See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206256691


Two Blind Turtles

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115625


[Event "CSCC Pin Is Mighty Rapid Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.07.19"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Langseth, DuWayne"]

[Black "Rountree, Brian"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A45"]

[WhiteElo "1316"]

[BlackElo "1464"]

[PlyCount "135"]

[EventDate "2020.07.19"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. e3 d5 3. f4 Bf5 4. Bd3 Be4 5. Nf3 e6 6. O-O c5 7. c3 c4 8. Bc2 Nc6

9. Nbd2 Bg6 10. Ne5 Bxc2 11. Qxc2 Bd6 12. e4 Nxe4 13. Nxe4 dxe4 14. Qxe4 O-O

15. Nxc6 bxc6 16. Qxc6 Rc8 17. Qe4 Qb6 18. Rf3 Qc6 19. Qxc6 Rxc6 20. Bd2 Rb8

21. Bc1 h5 22. g3 g6 23. Rf1 Kg7 24. Rd1 Rb5 25. Kf2 Rc8 26. Ke2 Rh8 27. Rb1 h4

28. Be3 hxg3 29. hxg3 Rh2+ 30. Bf2 g5 31. Kf3 Rf5 32. Be3 gxf4 33. gxf4 Rh3+

34. Ke4 Rh2 35. Rg1+ Kf8 36. b3 Re2 37. bxc4 Bxf4 38. Rge1 Rxe1 39. Rxe1 Bxe3

40. Kxe3 Ra5 41. Re2 Ra3 42. Kd3 a5 43. c5 Ra4 44. Rb2 Ke7 45. Rb7+ Ke8 46. c6

Kd8 47. Rxf7 Rxa2 48. Rf6 Ke7 49. Rf7+ Kd8 50. Kc4 Re2 51. Kc5 Re3 52. Kd6 Ke8

53. Rh7 Rxc3 54. Rh8+ Kf7 55. c7 Rc4 56. c8=Q Rxd4+ 57. Kc5 Rd5+ 58. Kc4 a4 59.

Qe8+ Kf6 60. Rh6+ Ke5 61. Rh5+ Kd6 62. Rxd5+ exd5+ 63. Kd4 a3 64. Qe5+ Kc6 65.

Qxd5+ Kb6 66. Qc4 Ka5 67. Kc5 a2 68. Qb5# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On July 19th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Pin Is Mighty Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-pin-is-mighty-rapid-online-1329073


Place, CSCC Pin Is Mighty (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 msmcgough (1532)" 4.0

2 "#2 DuWayneL (1363)" 3.0

3 "#3 linuxguy1 (1483)" 3.0

4 "#4 Czechmate1972 (1473)" 2.0

5 "#5 CosmicNovaGalaxy (1328)" 2.0

6 "#6 tanguay1 (707)" 1.0

7 "#6 Navajo36us80917 (1110)" 1.0

8 "#8 abarkaw (1835)" 0.0

P Is For Pin IX

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 18, 2020 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.   It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.   So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples. 


The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on May 10th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/48235330-d-is-for-discovery-viii).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 17th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/48284687-r-is-for-removal-ix).  The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload, which I revisited on June 21 (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/entries/show/48638090-o-is-for-overload-ix)


The fourth kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Pin.


Pin is a chess move that immobilizes an opponent's piece.

 

The Pin is different from the other kinds of tactics in that it does not create multiple threats.  Its main function is to prevent a piece from moving.   A Pin on a target allows that target to be attacked by a lower value piece.  A Pin on a support allows the capture of the piece the support is guarding.


 

“The pin is mightier than the sword.”

Fred Reinfeld

 

The Pin works by threatening a low value piece that has a higher value piece (or an unguarded piece) behind it.  The low value piece is stuck (as if with a pin) to the higher value piece due to the loss of material should the low value piece move and allow the capture of the higher value piece.

 

If the higher value piece is the King, the low value piece is absolutely immobilized, as the rules of Chess do not allow moves where the King could be captured.  Otherwise the Pin is relative, as the opponent can actually move the low value piece if he is willing to accept the loss of material.  The other types of Pins are rare:


  • Absolute (Pins a target to the King)
  • Relative (Pins a low value target to a higher value piece)
  • Cross (Multiple Pins on one piece)
  • Cross-check (blocks check and counter-checks)


Here is an example from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Sunday-night event:  CSCC Killer Bloodgood Rapid Online.  Alex Bozhenov was going for his first medal in our online summer games and trying to stay unbeaten in Rapid time control.  However, LM Brian Wall was trying to take the lead in the medal count and grabbed a Pawn in the opening.  Alex had a golden shot to win the game but picked the 2nd best move and ended up with the silver. 


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206251535


P Is For Pin VIII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115616


[Event "CSCC Killer Bloodgood Rapid Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.07.12"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Black "Wall, Brian"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "D94"]

[WhiteElo "1808"]

[BlackElo "1946"]

[PlyCount "62"]

[EventDate "2020.07.12"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e3 O-O 5. d4 c5 6. Be2 d5 7. O-O Nc6 8. cxd5

Nxd5 9. e4 Nxc3 10. bxc3 cxd4 11. cxd4 Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Qxd4 13. Qxd4 Bxd4 14. Rb1

b6 15. Bh6 Rd8 16. Rfc1 Rd7 17. Bb5 Bc5 18. Bxd7 Bxd7 19. Be3 Bxe3 20. fxe3 Be6

21. Rb2 Kg7 22. Rc7 Kf6 23. Kf2 g5 24. h3 h5 25. Kf3 h4 26. a4 Ke5 27. Rxe7 Kd6

28. Rb7 Kc6 29. Re7 Kd6 30. Rb7 Kc6 31. Re7 Kd6 1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On July 12th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer Bloodgood Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-killer-bloodgood-rapid-online-1313555


Place, CSCC Killer Bloodgood (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1 NM BrianWall (1958)" 3.5

2 "#2 bozhenoff (1788)" 3.0

3 "#3 cschessnews (1694)" 2.5

4 "#4 JJ7X (1771)" 2.0

5 "#5 KingVed (1471)" 2.0

6 "#6 Czechmate1972 (1569)" 2.0

7 "#7 CosmicNovaGalaxy (1342)" 1.0

8 "#8 liencam2 (1180)" 0.0

9 "- Navajo36us80917 (1130)" 1.0

10 "- msmcgough (1487)" 0.0

Killer Bloodgood

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 8, 2020 at 6:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Matt Grinberg

 

Claude Frizzel Bloodgood - the name is enough to scare you even before you know about his life.  He was born in 1937 in California, but lived most of his life in Virginia.  There is some suggestion that he may have been playing in chess tournaments as early as the mid 1950's, but the first time he appears on the annual USCF rating list was 1960.  He continued to play for the next two years, reaching a rating of 2043.  During this time he also served as the rating statistician for the Virginia Chess Federation (VCF).

 

But then he headed down the wrong path.  He was convicted on two counts of burglary and one of forgery.   He spent several years in prison.  He got out in 1969, but just nine days after his release he murdered his mother.  He was convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to death.  Fortunately for Bloodgood, before the sentence had been carried out, the Supreme court ruled in Furman vs. Georgia, 1972, that the death penalty, as then administered, was unconstitutional.   His sentence was commuted to life imprisonment in Virginia.

 

This is where his chess life picks up again.   As a recognized Expert, the prison officials were only too happy to have him organize a prison chess program.  He got the prison chess club registered with the USCF and started organizing tournaments in the prison.  He so impressed the prison administration that in 1974 they decided to allow Bloodgood and one of his fellow inmates a furlough to play in a VCF tournament with a guard.  Bloodgood and his fellow inmate disappeared at the earliest opportunity.  They were both recaptured shortly.   This was the first time I heard of him - the whole Virginia chess community was abuzz.


Needless to say, Bloodgood was not allowed another furlough.  However, the prison chess activities continued at least until 1977, when he had a rating of 1873 on the annual list.  After that apparently there were no more USCF events at the prison for a while.

 

Sixteen years go by and suddenly in 1993 Bloodgood reappears on the annual list with a rating of 2386.  What!  How could someone who was already 40 years old in 1977 with a rating of 1873, suddenly become almost a 2400 player in 1993 even though the USCF records show no activity for him between 1977 and 1993?

 

In early 1994, the prison started having USCF rated tournaments again.  USCF records show that over the next 5 years Bloodgood played 3,174 games in 699 prison tournaments.  What!!   Okay, maybe he didn't have anything better to do sitting in prison, but even so that strains credulity.

 

By the end of 1996 Bloodgood's rating had risen to 2712, making him one of the highest rated players in the U.S.A. and eligible to play in the U.S. Championship Tournament. During this same period some of the tournaments in the Powhatan Correctional Center allowed outside players to enter.   According to Virginia players I knew who played Bloodgood, he played more like a 1700 player than a 2700 player.

 

When the USCF realized that they might be obligated to invite an imprisoned convicted murderer to the national championship, they launched an investigation.  It seems likely that Bloodgood, who was familiar with how the rating system worked, had manipulated the system to boost his own rating, not to mention the ratings of several other inmates who also had master ratings at that point.  Bloodgood himself claimed that he had done nothing wrong and the problem was with the way the USCF ran the rating system.  Whatever the case, he was not invited to the U.S. Championship, not that it is likely he would have been allowed to go anyway.

 

Bloodgood died in 2001 still holding a 2639 rating.


USCF Annual Ratings for Claude Bloodgood

1960 - 1798

1961 - 2043

1962 - 1856

1972 - 2089

1977 - 1982

1978 - 1873

1993 - 2386

1994 - 2234

1995 - 2573

1996 - 2712

1997 - 2639

1999 - 2639

 

There are not many of Bloodgood's games that can be found.  The game below is from before Bloodgood's first prison term.   The quality of the game is not particularly good, but it is interesting because of the unusual opening, Grob Opening, and the final combination.

 

Bloodgood, Claude - Evans, B, 1-0

USO Invitational

Norfolk, Virginia, 1961


Grob Opening


1. g4?!

 

The Grob Opening - probably the worst first move White can make.  He leaves the pawn out there undefended.   But the worst thing about it is that White weakens his whole kingside.  Bloodgood apparently played this on his first move as White in every game.   He even wrote a book on the Grob, "The Tactical Grob," which can be found as an e-book online.  There are some points to the Grob.   First, it is likely to take Black out of any opening preparation he has.   Second, due to the threat of g5, it makes it difficult for Black to develop his king knight to its normal square at f6.


1... d5 2. Bg2 c6


[Black could take the g-pawn, but it is risky due to the weakening of the h1-a8 diagonal. This is the other main point of the Grob.  White hopes that Black will take, giving White good attacking chances on the light squares. 2... Bxg4 3. c4 c6 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. Qb3 White has potential threats along both the h1-a8 and a2-g8 diagonals, but he does not have enough for the pawn]


3. g5 e5 4. h4 Bd6 5. d3 Be6 6. e4 Ne7


To here, this is a normal Grob (to the extent that anything about the Grob could be considered "normal").  White's position has been compromised by the kingside pawn moves and Black is ahead in development.   Black is better.


7. Nd2


This move is a novelty.  That does not mean to say it is a bad move.   What it does say is that the Grob is so rarely played that it is easy to find a new move already at move seven.


[The "normal" move is 7. Nc3 but in the following game Black plays simple, straight forward chess and wins easily. 7... Nd7 8. exd5 cxd5 9. Bd2 a6 10. Nge2 Qc7 11. f4 O-O 12. O-O f6 13. Ng3 fxg5 14. hxg5 exf4 15. Qe2 Be5 16. Bxf4 Qb6 17. Be3 d4 18. Na4 Qb4 19. Bf4 Rxf4 20. Rxf4 Ng6 21. Nh5 Qxa4 22. Re4 Bf5 23. Rxe5 Ndxe5 24. Bd5 Kh8 25. Ng3 Bg4 26. Qg2 Qd7 27. Re1 Nh4 0-1, Holick, Manfred – Kranz, Armin (AUT) 2101, Goetzis 1995 It (open)]


7... O-O 8. Bh3 Bxh3 9. Nxh3 f5 10. gxf6 Rxf6


In spite of the opening, play has been reasonable on both sides up to here.  But now things get ugly. 


11. exd5?! 


This has to be bad since it gives up what little center control White has, but it is hard to come up with a good suggestion for him. 


11... Nxd5? 


Black wants to get his knight active, but in the process he gives White a beautiful square for his own knights on e4.


[Better is 11... cxd5 keeping White bottled up.  Black's strong center and better development, plus White's weak kingside, give Black the clearly better position]


12. Ne4 Rf7?


Since "clearly" one of White's knights is going to g5, this is not a good place for the rook.


[12... Rf8 is better]


13. Bg5?


But it wasn't so clear to Bloodgood.


[13. Nhg5 Re7 14. Qh5 g6 15. Qh6 to be followed by h5 gives White a very strong attack]


13... Be7 14. Qg4 Qa5?!


The check is dubious since it takes the queen away from the kingside where it is needed for defense.


[Much better is 14... Qd7 15. Qg3 Bb4 16. c3 Bf8 17. h5 Qf5 18. h6 g6 19. O-O-O Nd7 The chances are about equal]


15. c3?


White returns the favor.


[Since he should have a knight on g5 instead of his bishop, he should play 15. Bd2 which both clears g5 for his knights and gains a tempo off of Black's queen]


15... Bxg5??


Black facilitates a White knight coming to g5 and his position immediately falls apart.


[Houdini gives this spirited line leading to a perpetual check. 15... Na6 16. Rg1 Nc5 17. Nxc5 Bxc5 18. Bh6 Nxc3 19. Qe6 Nd5 20. Kd1 Qa4 21. Kc1 Bf8 22. Ng5 Qf4 23. Kb1 Qxf2 24. Nxf7 Qxg1 In what follows White will never be able to move his king to the second rank because doing so will allow Black to win by playing Qf2+ followed by Qxf7. 25. Bc1 Now White threatens 26. Nh6+ Kh8, 27. Qg8 mate. 25... Nc3! 26. bxc3 Qb6 27. Bb2 Qg1 28. Bc1 Qb6 29. Bb2 Qg1 Draw]


16. Nhxg5 Rf8??


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206245040


Black is either not familiar with the idea of the smothered mate or he is committing suicide.  White now has a forced mate in five moves.


[The best try is 16... Qc7 17. Nxf7 Qxf7 18. Qc8 Qf8 19. Qxb7 Nb6 20. Rg1 White is an exchange and pawn up and still has a strong attack after he castles queenside and brings his other rook into play]

 

17. Qe6 Kh8 18. Nf7 Kg8


[18... Rxf7 19. Qe8 Rf8 20. Qxf8#]


19. Nh6 Kh8 20. Qg8! Rxg8 21. Nf7#


The finish is nice, but the game as a whole is not what you would expect of a 2700 player.


Killer Bloodgood

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115602

 

[Event "Norfolk USO Inv."]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1961.??.??"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Bloodgood, Claude Frizzel"]

[Black "Evans, B ."]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A00"]

[PlyCount "41"]

[EventDate "1961.??.??"]

 

1. g4 d5 2. Bg2 c6 3. g5 e5 4. h4 Bd6 5. d3 Be6 6. e4 Ne7 7. Nd2 O-O 8. Bh3

Bxh3 9. Nxh3 f5 10. gxf6 Rxf6 11. exd5 Nxd5 12. Ne4 Rf7 13. Bg5 Be7 14. Qg4

Qa5+ 15. c3 Bxg5 16. Nhxg5 Rf8 17. Qe6+ Kh8 18. Nf7+ Kg8 19. Nh6+ Kh8 20. Qg8+

Rxg8 21. Nf7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On July 5th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Black Hole Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-black-hole-rapid-online-1307559


Place CSCC Black Hole (4SS, G/10+10) Score


1 "#1 DFSStar (2172)" 3.5

2 "#2 NM RichardShtivelband (2362)" 3.5

3 "#3 Czechmate1972 (1571)" 3.0

4 "#4 cschessnews (1687)" 2.5

5 "#5 JJ7X (1832)" 2.0

6 "#6 linuxguy1 (1496)" 2.0

7 "#7 bestatcheckers7 (1537)" 2.0

8 "#8 CosmicNovaGalaxy (1347)" 2.0

9 "#9 Navajo36us80917 (1130)" 1.5

10 "#10 KingVed (1460)" 1.0

11 "#11 alaynew (1283)" 1.0

12 "- tanguay1 (734)" 0.0

13 "- Honeybrook (1318)" 0.0

Black Hole Of Computer Analysis

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 2, 2020 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week 


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Killer Latency Rapid Online (3SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Brian Rountree and Alayne Wilinsky.  They have only faced once online, at least in a rapid time control.


Alayne Wilinsky is the 4th strongest female chess player in Colorado and an officer of the Denver Chess Club.  She organizes the Online Blitz Arena the club plays on Tuesday nights.


When I saw she drew Brian Rountree, a past officer of the Colorado Springs Chess Club, I was interested in checking out the game.  Then I got sucked into a black hole of computer analysis.


Online chess has some nice features:  automated TD, automated score keeping, and computer analysis.  However, I don't find myself taking advantage of these features.  Or, maybe I should say, I don't find myself benefiting from these features.


I do look at the computer analysis.  In this game, Alayne scored better on the accuracy with 84.9% to Brian's 82.7%.  And this time, I checked out the retry feature, which picked 3 places to guess a better move than Brian did.


The first retry was on move 6.  Being new to this retry thing, I picked the same move as Brian.  The computer quickly scolded me with "?! Inaccuracy."  As I looked at it some more, I couldn't figure out why the computer scored the position as +2.15 verses Brian's move with +1.40.  I thought he missed a winning move and settled for just a better position. 


So, I played out the line with the computer's best moves to see where the big advantage was.  As I got closer to the event horizon, time began to slow down, the pieces began to stretch, and everything went dark.  Soon, nothing made any sense, and all the positional advantage was sucked into the vortex.  It was a journey to nowhere for nothing.


No wonder it was a draw.  See if you can find the computer best move and its purpose.

 

White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206239281

 

Black Hole Of Computer Analysis

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115568


[Event "CSCC Killer Latency Rapid Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.06.28"]

[Round "3.3"]

[White "Rountree, Brian"]

[Black "Wilinsky, Alayne"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "A40"]

[WhiteElo "1531"]

[BlackElo "1307"]

[PlyCount "76"]

[EventDate "2020.06.28"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. d4 e6 2. e4 f5 3. Nc3 d6 4. Bd3 fxe4 5. Nxe4 Nf6 6. Bg5 Be7 7. Nxf6+ Bxf6 8.

Qh5+ Kd7 9. Nf3 g6 10. Qh4 Bxg5 11. Qxg5 Qxg5 12. Nxg5 Ke7 13. O-O-O Nc6 14. c3

h6 15. Nf3 g5 16. Rhe1 Kf7 17. h3 a6 18. Re2 Bd7 19. Rde1 Rhe8 20. a3 b5 21.

Bc2 a5 22. Bd3 Rab8 23. Nh2 b4 24. Ng4 Kg7 25. axb4 axb4 26. Bc4 d5 27. Bd3

bxc3 28. bxc3 Ra8 29. Ne5 Nxe5 30. Rxe5 Ra3 31. Kd2 Rb8 32. Rc1 Rb2+ 33. Rc2

Raa2 34. Rxb2 Rxb2+ 35. Ke3 Rb3 36. Kd2 Rb2+ 37. Ke3 Rb3 38. Kd2 Rb2+ 1/2-1/2


This Week In Chess


On June 28th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer Latency Rapid Online event (3SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-killer-latency-rapid-online-1291746


Place, CSCC Killer Latency (3SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1NMBrianWall (1939)" 3.0

2 "#2KingVed (1471)" 2.0

3 "#3JJ7X (1817)" 2.0

4 "#4cschessnews (1697)" 1.0

5 "#5alaynew (1307)" 0.5

6 "#5linuxguy1 (1531)" 0.5

7 "-liencam2 (1220)" 1.0

8 "-EPWikle (1912)" 0.0

Killer Latency

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 25, 2020 at 6:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Overload Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Jose Llacza and Mark McGough. They have faced each other twice online.  Jose got the first game, and Mark evened the score with this game.


Mark has a little more experience with the rapid time control with 30 games versus 24 games by Jose.  However, Jose has fared better with 17 wins to Mark's 14 wins.  I don't know if they have played each other over the board, as the USCF website was hacked, and I couldn't get any statistics from them to pad my blog.


I did find out that Mark's most common rapid opponent online is Dean Brown!


In any case, Mark was on fire this night.  He moved from playing on his tablet to playing on his phone.  He told me that he made the switch to avoid the latency.  I was not sure exactly what he meant by this.  However, after seeing him score a 98.6% accuracy and winning his first virtual medal, I am guessing he was referring to his undeveloped and unmanifested ability to attack in a chess game.  It had always been in a state of existence, but it was concealed from the online viewers prior to this game.

 

Now, his latent ability was, at last, revealed with this killer move.


Black to move

See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206234256


Killer Latency

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115553

 

[Event "CSCC Overload Rapid Online"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.06.21"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Llacza, Jose"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D32"]

[WhiteElo "1689"]

[BlackElo "1467"]

[PlyCount "38"]

[EventDate "2020.06.21"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. c4 e6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 c5 4. Nf3 cxd4 5. Qxd4 Nc6 6. Qd1 d5 7. cxd5 exd5 8.

e3 a6 9. Be2 Bc5 10. O-O O-O 11. h3 b5 12. a3 Bb7 13. b4 Bb6 14. Bb2 d4 15.

exd4 Nxd4 16. Nxd4 Qxd4 17. Qb3 Qf4 18. Bc1 Qg3 19. Rb1 Qxg2# 0-1

 

This Week In Chess


On June 21st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Overload Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).

 

https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-overload-rapid-online-1275546

 

Place, CSCC Overload (4SS, G/10+10), Score


1 "#1DFSStar (2105)" 3.5

2 "#2msmcgough (1487)" 3.0

3 "#3JJ7X (1830)" 2.5

4 "#4CosmicNovaGalaxy (1347)" 2.0

5 "#5cschessnews (1737)" 2.0

6 "#6Navajo36us80917 (1119)" 2.0

7 "#7jfoxhoot (1525)" 1.0

8 "#8Honeybrook (1314)" 1.0

9 "-Skadelig (1395)" 0.0

O Is For Overload IX

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 21, 2020 at 9:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on May 10th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/48235330-d-is-for-discovery-viii).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 17th (https://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/48284687-r-is-for-removal-ix).  The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload.


Overload is a chess move that attacks a target.


The Overload is played when the player creates a threat on a target that cannot be defended.  The classic example is choosing a target and piling more attackers on it than supports the defender can muster.  When the number of attackers are greater than the number of supports, material can be won through a series of captures.  Each capture creates a new target until the final support is exhausted and an unguarded target appears.


However, the Overload is, perhaps, the most broad kind of tactic.  Not only does it use multiple attackers on one target, but also it uses a single attacker on multiple targets. The idea is the same: to gain a target than cannot be defended.   So, most players will become familiar with the different types of Overload:

 

  • Battery (Overload with multiple attackers on a file or diagonal)
  • Fork (Overload with multiple targets by the Knight)
  • Double Attack (Overload with multiple targets by the other pieces)
  • Over-Worked Piece (Overload with multiple targets)
  • Skewer (Overload with multiple targets where a high value piece is in front)


Here is a position from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Corona, No Lime Rapid Online tournament.  Since it is Father's Day, I chose one of my losses.  This one came at the hands of LM Brian Wall.  Sort of.  Part of the reason I lost was my blindness to the Overload tactic, which I finally saw on my fourth attempt.  See if you can spot it right away.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206229917


O Is For Overload IX

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115541


[Event "CSCC Corona, No Lime Online"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.04.26"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Wall, Brian"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D05"]

[WhiteElo "1728"]

[BlackElo "1911"]

[PlyCount "118"]

[EventDate "2020.04.26"]

[TimeControl "900+10"]

 

1. d4 c5 2. c3 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 b6 5. Bd3 Bb7 6. O-O d5 7. Bb5+ Nbd7 8. Ne5

a6 9. Be2 Nxe5 10. dxe5 Nd7 11. f4 Be7 12. Na3 O-O 13. Nc2 f6 14. exf6 gxf6 15.

Bg4 f5 16. Be2 Nf6 17. Ne1 Ne4 18. Nf3 Bf6 19. Nd2 Kh8 20. Nxe4 fxe4 21. Bg4 e5

22. fxe5 Bxe5 23. Rxf8+ Qxf8 24. Qe2 Qd6 25. g3 Rf8 26. Bd2 d4 27. cxd4 cxd4

28. Rb1 d3 29. Qe1 Bd5 30. b3 Qa3 31. Bc3 Qd6 32. Rc1 Kg8 33. Bb4 Qf6 34. Bxf8

Kxf8 35. Qf2 Ke7 36. Qxf6+ Kxf6 37. Kf2 a5 38. Rc8 Bd6 39. Rd8 Ke5 40. Rh8 a4

41. Bd1 a3 42. Rxh7 Kf6 43. Rh6+ Ke7 44. h4 Bc6 45. g4 Bb5 46. Rxd6 Kxd6 47.

Ke1 Bd7 48. Kd2 Be6 49. Kc3 Kc5 50. h5 b5 51. g5 b4+ 52. Kd2 Kd6 53. Ke1 Ke5

54. g6 Kf6 55. Kf2 Kg5 56. Kg3 Bd5 57. Bg4 Bxb3 58. axb3 Kh6 59. Bf5 d2 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

 

On June 14th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer Pawn Rapid Online event (3SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-killer-pawn-rapid-online-1258826

 

Place, CSCC Killer Pawn (3SS, G/10+10), Score

 

1 "#1JJ7X (1840)" 3.0

2 "#2CosmicNovaGalaxy (1323)" 2.0

3 "#3cschessnews (1784)" 2.0

4 "#3RayFchess (1647)" 2.0

5 "#5linuxguy1 (1550)" 1.0

6 "#6HermitCrab0 (1464)" 1.0

7 "#7bestatcheckers7 (1498)" 1.0

8 "#8KingVed (1453)" 0.0

Killer Pawn

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 14, 2020 at 2:40 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event: CSCC Killer Curfew Rapid Online (4SS, G/10+10).  It was played by Vedant Margale and Dean Brown.  Vedant is ranked at 98 for the Top 100 - Age 10 by USCF.  Dean is his top USCF opponent in the past year and fifth all-time.


I had asked for Game Of The Week suggestions during the tournament, and Vedant quickly responded.  I think he had an unfair advantage, as most of our older players don't know how to operate the chat window and may not have seen the request.  I decided to get suggestions this week, as my plan to go over all the games in the online event has not panned out. 


It is funny that when I have to hand-enter all the score sheets myself, I see all the games.  But have the computer do all the work, and I don't look at any games.


I also liked this game because of how it finished.  I was amused by the online computer when it gave me an award for applying checkmate with a Bishop.  The award was called Killer Bishop and started my Killer theme. 


Well, I got another award this week when I checkmated with a Pawn.  I had to pause because I didn't remember winning that way.  As I went over my games, I finally realized that I got the award when I promoted my Pawn to a Queen with checkmate.


Does that count as a Pawn Mate or a Queen Mate?


Here is how Vedant's suggestion ended.  What award would you give him?

 

White to mate


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206221528

 

Killer Pawn

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115521

 

[Event "CSCC Killer Curfew Rapid Online"]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.06.07"]

[Round "3.5"]

[White "Margale, Vedant"]

[Black "Brown, Dean"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1491"]

[BlackElo "1087"]

[PlyCount "53"]

[EventDate "2020.05.10"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. f4 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. d3 Nf6 6. Be2 d6 7. O-O O-O 8. Qe1

Bg4 9. h3 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Nd4 11. Bd1 e6 12. Ne2 Nd7 13. Nxd4 Bxd4+ 14. Kh1 Qb6

15. c3 Bg7 16. Qg3 Qa6 17. Bb3 Nb6 18. f5 d5 19. f6 Bh8 20. Bh6 Rfd8 21. Qg5

dxe4 22. dxe4 Qe2 23. Bxe6 Qxe4 24. Rae1 Qa4 25. Bxf7+ Kxf7 26. Re7+ Kg8 27.

f7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On June 7th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer Curfew Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).

 

https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/-cscc-killer-curfew-rapid-online-1252324

 

Place, Player, Score

 

1 "#1NMBrianWall (1900)" 4.0

2 "#2cschessnews (1807)" 2.5

3 "#3RayFchess (1579)" 2.5

4 "#4Skadelig (1545)" 2.0

5 "#4linuxguy1 (1538)" 2.0

6 "#4JJ7X (1734)" 2.0

7 "#7msmcgough (1427)" 2.0

8 "#8liencam2 (1223)" 1.0

9 "#8KingVed (1481)" 1.0

10 "#10Navajo36us80917 (1087)" 1.0

11 "#10amauer01 (1025)" 1.0

12 "#12CosmicNovaGalaxy (1298)" 0.0

Killer Curfew

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 7, 2020 at 3:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Killer TD Rapid Online (3SS, G/10+10).  I chose this game as a protest against club Treasurer, Mark "The Money Man" McGough for shooting down my idea of giving out some prizes for the online events.


I thought it would be nice for the club to do something for the players who showed up for our virtual tournaments.  I was willing to do all the grunt work and count up the cyber-medal tallies, and the club could donate cash and food to the top winners like McDonald's used to do during the olympics.

 

Here are the current cyber-medal counts:

 

Player, Gold, Silver, Bronze - Total

 

cschessnews 3 3 0 - 6 [not prize eligible]

BrianWall 2 1 2 - 5

jfoxhoot 0 0 3 - 3

deanclow 1 0 1 - 2

Termenoil 0 1 0 - 1

Alf8892 0 1 0 - 1

linuxguy1 0 0 1 - 1

EPWikle 0 0 1 - 1

DFSStar 1 0 0 - 1

waynehatcher 1 0 0 - 1

KingVed 0 1 0 - 1

RayFchess 0 1 0 - 1


Of course, I would have excluded the officers from receiving any prizes to avoid any conflict of interest complaints.  After all, just the sheer joy of running this club week after week is thanks enough for all the man-hours of dealing with one headache after another.  Plus, I only ran for President of the Chess Club to meet women anyway, but I digress.


You need Adobe Flash Player to view this content.


But, nooooooooooooooooooooooooo!


Mark jumps in before I even have a chance to finish my pitch, "I am sick of this online [email protected]#$%^&*!  I want to open the club!  I will even pay for all the sneeze-guards and hand sanitizers for every board."  He was so upset that he protested the last online event by withdrawing after his round one game.


Well, two can play that game, buster.  I will meet your protest with a protest of my own:  publishing your loss.  And, I will go one better.  I will raise your protest with a curfew.


Executive Order #1:


As President of the Colorado Springs Chess Club, I hereby decree:  no turtles shall be allowed to play a chess game after 10 pm!  Three hours is long enough!!  Just move faster!!!


The curfew will continue until I can find someone who agrees with me that online prizes matter.


White to move

 

See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206213886

 

Killer Curfew

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115503


[Event "CSCC Killer TD Rapid Online "]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.05.31"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "cschessnews"]

[Black "msmcgough"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A40"]

[WhiteElo "1829"]

[BlackElo "1425"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

[EndTime "18:28:55 PDT"]

[Termination "cschessnews won by resignation"]

 

1. d4 e6 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 d5 4. Nh3 c5 5. c3 Nc6 6. O-O Be7 7. Nf4 O-O 8. e3 Rb8

9. b3 b5 10. Bb2 cxd4 11. cxd4 b4 12. Nd2 Ba6 13. Re1 Qb6 14. Bf1 Bxf1 15. Kxf1

Rfc8 16. Qe2 Qb5 17. Rec1 Qxe2+ 18. Kxe2 Na5 19. Nd3 Kf8 20. h3 Ke8 21. g4 h6

22. f3 Kd7 23. h4 g5 24. hxg5 hxg5 25. Ne5+ Ke8 26. Kd3 Nd7 27. Nxd7 Kxd7 28.

Rh1 Rh8 29. Rag1 Rbc8 30. Nf1 Nb7 31. Ng3 Nd6 32. e4 dxe4+ 33. fxe4 Nb5 34. Ne2

a5 35. d5 Rxh1 36. Rxh1 exd5 37. exd5 Kd6 38. Rh7 Rf8 39. Ke4 Nc7 40. Be5+ Kd7

41. Ng3 Nb5 42. Nf5 Nc3+ 43. Bxc3 bxc3 44. Kd3 Bf6 45. Rh6 Be5 46. Ra6 Rc8 47.

Kc2 Rc5 48. Ra7+ Ke8 49. Re7+ Kf8 50. Rxe5 1-0

 

This Week In Chess

 

On May 31st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer TD Rapid Online event (3SS, G/10+10).

 

https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-killer-td-rapid-online-1245616

 

Place, Player, Score


1 "#1cschessnews (1832)" 2.5

2 "#2RayFchess (1565)" 2.0

3 "#3NMBrianWall (1859)" 1.5

4 "#4waynehatcher (1687)" 1.0

5 "#4Navajo36us80917 (1111)" 1.0

6 "#6checkmatenow (2072)" 0.0

7 "-CoChessPrincess (1985)" 2.0

8 "-msmcgough (1425)" 1.0

Killer TD

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 31, 2020 at 2:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Killer Bishop Rapid Online (3SS, G/10+10).  It was nice to see that the computer can run these events without having to be present.  I was unable to play in the event due to the surprise Memorial Day blizzard.



Of course, the computer can be unpredictable at times.  I had asked it to run a four-round event like we had been doing the past several weeks.  However, the computer called things quits after three rounds.  It could have been because of the lighter holiday turnout that didn't need more than 3 rounds to determine a winner, or it could have been because the computer is a ruthless TD.


When it comes to running a Swiss tournament, the computer will show no mercy:

 

  • No half point byes
  • No announcements
  • No warnings
  • Limited late entrants
  • One second late = no pairing
  • Starts your clock immediately
  • Bans Jeff Fox from round 1
  • Doesn't follow advertisement
  • Leaves early
  • Doesn't let you take prizes home

I would fire the bum, but it works cheap and shows ups on time.  At least, we get a couple of rounds in to find some wild positions like this game from round 2.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206209086


Killer TD

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115488

 

[Event "CSCC Killer Bishop Rapid Online "]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.05.24"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "mrpicklez"]

[Black "waynehatcher"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B09"]

[WhiteElo "1795"]

[BlackElo "1741"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

[EndTime "19:03:39 PDT"]

[Termination "waynehatcher won by resignation"]


1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. f4 Bg7 5. Nf3 c5 6. Bb5+ Bd7 7. e5 Ng4 8. e6

fxe6 9. Ng5 Bxb5 10. Nxe6 Bxd4 11. Nxd4 Bd7 12. Nf3 Nf6 13. O-O O-O 14. Nd5 Nc6

15. Nxf6+ Rxf6 16. Ng5 h6 17. Ne4 Rf8 18. Qd5+ Kg7 19. Bd2 Qc8 20. Bc3+ Kh7 21.

Ng5+ hxg5 22. Qxg5 Rf5 23. Qg3 Rh5 24. Rae1 Qf8 25. Qf3 Qf5 26. h3 Qd5 27. Qe3

Rf8 28. g4 Bxg4 29. Qg3 Bxh3 30. Rf3 Bf5 31. Kf2 Rh3 32. Qg2 Qxf3+ 33. Qxf3

Rxf3+ 34. Kxf3 Kg8 35. Rh1 Kf7 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 24th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Killer Bishop Rapid Online event (3SS, G/10+10).


https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-killer-bishop-rapid-online-1237640


Place, Player, Score

 

1 "#1waynehatcher 1754)" 2.5

2 "#2KingVed (1489)" 2.0

3 "#3jfoxhoot (1542)" 2.0

4 "#4mrpicklez (1742)" 1.0

5 "#5linuxguy1 (1526)" 1.0

6 "#6HermitCrab0 (1486)" 1.0

7 "#6CosmicNovaGalaxy (1298)" 1.0

8 "#8Navajo36us80917 (1119)" 0.5

9 "-MoxRuby (Unrated)" 1.0

Killer Bishop

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 23, 2020 at 4:10 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

  

This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's event:  CSCC Removal Rapid Online.  It was a four round, Swiss system tournament (G/10+10).  We have been meeting online every Sunday night after the Coronavirus shut down the regular club.  We started at 8pm mountain time due to the grocery stores closing early.  However, with the stores going back to regular hours and having some of our younger players joining the events, we moved the start time up to 7pm.  Also, we shortened the time control a bit to get the event done in about 2 hours.


The online events have worked out pretty well.  I have seen some regulars from the club, some old-timers from the club's past, and even some out-of-towners.  Anyone is welcome to play.  All you need is a chess.com account and join the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  I post the tournament link on the calendar.


Last Sunday, we had a player from California join the event, Brian Morris. We got paired in the first round.  I got a virtual award for winning this game.  So, it is the only game I was motivated enough to look over for the week.


I didn't think I played that well.  I always felt like I was a step behind.  I thought Brian was seeing moves better than I was.  However, I wasn't in big trouble.  I just felt like I was going to draw.


The online computer was much nicer.  It scored me with a 97.7% accuracy and Brian was close with a 95.7% accuracy.  It gave me zero mistakes and blunders while Brian only had 2 blunders at the end when he was in time pressure that gave me the game.


And then, I got a notification that I had earned a new achievement award for this game!


I think the computer is programmed to be overly kind to lure you back to the site over and over again until you are addicted to getting a gold star for every crappy game you play.  It feels like the computer is Mr. Rogers handing out participation ribbons at a scholastic tournament, "Well done, Paul, you are special!"


If you can guess what my newest chess achievement is, I will give you a virtual gold star!  And don't feel bad if you can solve this one, I will give you a virtual participation ribbon just for trying!

 

Black to move

See the diagram and answer here:

https://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=206203343

 

Killer Bishop

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=115467


[Event "CSCC Removal Rapid Online "]

[Site "https://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2020.05.17"]

[Round "1.5"]

[White "Honeybrook"]

[Black "cschessnews"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B06"]

[WhiteElo "1317"]

[BlackElo "1794"]

[TimeControl "600+10"]

[EndTime "18:30:18 PDT"]

[Termination "cschessnews won by checkmate"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Bd3 d6 5. O-O Bg4 6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 Qc7 8. c3

Nd7 9. Be3 Ngf6 10. Re1 O-O 11. Nd2 e5 12. Rad1 Rfd8 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bxf6 Nxf6

15. Bc4 Qe7 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Bb3 Rd7 18. Qe3 a6 19. Nf3 Rad8 20. Rxd7 Rxd7 21.

Rd1 Rxd1+ 22. Bxd1 Qd7 23. Bb3 Nh7 24. Qc5 Qc7 25. h4 Nf8 26. g4 b6 27. Qe3 Nd7

28. g5 h5 29. a4 Nc5 30. Bc2 Ne6 31. Ne1 Nf4 32. Ng2 Nxg2 33. Kxg2 Bf8 34. b4 c5

35. b5 axb5 36. axb5 c4 37. Qd2 Bc5 38. Qd5 Qc8 39. f3 Qe6 40. Qxe6 fxe6 41. Kg3

Be3 42. Bb1 Bd2 43. Ba2 Be1+ 44. Kg2 Bxh4 45. Bxc4 Kf7 46. Kh3 Bxg5 47. Be2 Bd2

48. c4 Be3 49. Kh4 Kf6 50. Kg3 Kg5 51. Kh3 Bf2 52. Kg2 Bc5 53. Kh3 Kf4 54. Kh4

Bf2+ 55. Kh3 g5 56. Kg2 Bc5 57. Kh3 Ke3 58. Bf1 Kxf3 59. Bg2+ Kf2 60. Kh2 Be3

61. Bh3 g4 62. Bg2 h4 63. Bh1 Bf4# 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

 

On May 17th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held the CSCC Removal Rapid Online event (4SS, G/10+10).

 

https://www.chess.com/tournament/live/cscc-removal-rapid-online-1231456

 

Place, Player, Score 

 

1 "#1DFSStar (2147)" 4.0

2 "#2cschessnews (1823)" 3.0

3 "#3NMBrianWall (1882)" 2.5

4 "#4waynehatcher (1753)" 2.5

5 "#5linuxguy1 (1582)" 2.0

6 "#6jfoxhoot (1514)" 2.0

7 "#7KingVed (1468)" 1.5

8 "#8msmcgough (1430)" 1.5

9 "#9HermitCrab0 (1514)" 1.5

10 "#10Navajo36us80917 (1079)" 1.0

11 "#11Honeybrook (1296)" 1.0

12 "-mrpicklez (1752)" 1.5


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