Colorado Springs Chess News

The Knights Are Better Here!

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My name is Paul Anderson (http://www.facebook.com/paul.anderson.904750), and I began the newsletter on March 1, 2004 as a way for me to receive and distribute any last minute schedule changes about local chess events and to put to use the analysis and publishing features of my Fritz 8.

However, I soon realized that I liked reporting on the results of my local club and adding some humorous comments about the games I was publishing.  So, during my chess season (typically February to August) the newsletter will contain at least a couple of articles from me (This Week In Chess and Game Of The Week). 

Every now and then, I will receive chess news, chess games, or other chess stuff from my readers, which I am more than happy to include, as I think it makes for a better newsletter.  It doesn’t matter where you are from or what the news is about (as long as it is about chess); you are welcome to contribute.

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Chess Nuts Boasting In An Open Foyer

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 29, 2017 at 6:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Matt Grinberg


Have you ever heard this old chess joke?


It was sent in by Dennis Cravens in response to the Christmas Tree Chess Problems.  It was also sent to me by Jim Bailey's wife Katy a while back.  This was Katy's version:


A group of chess enthusiasts checked into a hotel and were standing in the lobby discussing their recent tournament victories.

After about an hour, the manager came out of the office and asked them to disperse. "But why?" they asked, as they moved off.

"Because," he said, "I can't stand chess-nuts boasting in an open foyer."


A friend of mine, Ray Jones, claimed he was the originator of this joke.  In fact, he said it was based on an experience of mine!


In August 1973, when Ray and I were both living in Arlington, Virginia, Ray his wife, Gloria, and I decided to go to the U.S. Open Chess Championship at the La Salle Hotel in Chicago.  The plan was that we would drive out together in their car, and after the tournament, we would drive back together. 


Ray had a tournament as bad as mine was good. He decided that, before going back to Arlington, he wanted to visit his parents in southern Missouri.  Well, I had to get back to work.  So, Ray and Gloria headed off to Missouri while I was left at the hotel.


It so happened that the hotel was attached to a Greyhound bus terminal.  I bought a ticket for Washington, DC and sat down in the lobby of the hotel to wait for the bus.  I broke out my chess set and started analyzing some games I was playing by correspondence in the 1972 Golden Knights.  GM Yasser Seirawan (U.S. Chess Champion in 1981, 1986, and 1989) saw me analyzing and asked if I would mind if he joined me.  At the time, Seirawan was a 13 year old 1600 player.


This tournament is where he first gained national attention.  He scored an astounding 8.5 - 3.5 against very strong competition, sending his rating over 2000.  I certainly knew who he was based on his performance.  I was flattered that he would want to analyze my game with me.  We were studying the game and Seirawan had interesting ideas of which I had not thought. 


Deeply engaged in our study, I suddenly heard someone say, "Excuse me gentlemen."


I looked up and saw someone from the hotel staff;  "Yes," I said.


"You are not allowed to play chess in the lobby."


As I was putting my pieces away, I couldn't help but think, "Let's see.  They just had the U.S. Open Chess Championship here.  There were a record 778 chess players in the two week tournament.  The tournament rented the huge ballroom on the 18th floor, plus most of their meeting rooms.  Most of chess players probably stayed in the hotel for the entire two weeks.   They just made a ton of money off of chess.  And yet, they are telling us we cannot play chess in their lobby!?"


When I saw Ray back in Arlington, I told him what happened.   Later that year, he told me the joke and told me it was based on my experience and the lyrics "chestnuts roasting in an open fire" from "The Christmas Song."  The best known recordings of "The Christmas Song" were done by Nat King Cole in 1946 and 1953.


Was Ray telling me the truth, or had he already heard the joke somewhere?


Well, sorry to say Ray, but I did a little research.  It would seem that the joke dates back about a year and a half before Ray Jones told it to me.  But, perhaps, he thought of it independently.


Black to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203971698


Chess Nuts Boasting In An Open Foyer

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=110213

 

[Event "Chessnuts Club"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.04.24"]


[Round "?"]

 

[White "Hartley, Mick"]

 

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

 

[Result "0-1"]

 

[PlyCount "68"]

 

[EventDate "2017.04.24"]

 

[TimeControl "0"]

 

 

1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 Bc5 4. h3 O-O 5. b3 c6 6. Bb2 d5 7. exd5 cxd5 8. d4

 

exd4 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. a3 Ne4 11. Qf3 Ne5 12. Qf4 Bd6 13. Qc1 Qh4 14. g3 Nxg3 15.

 

fxg3 Qxg3+ 16. Kd1 Re8 17. Ne2 Qf3 18. Re1 Bxh3 19. Bxd4 Nxd3 20. cxd3 Bg4 21.

 

Nbc3 Bg3 22. Qg5 g6 23. Qh6 Qxd3+ 24. Qd2 Qxd2+ 25. Kxd2 Bxe1+ 26. Rxe1 a6 27.

 

Nxd5 Rxe2+ 28. Rxe2 Bxe2 29. Kxe2 Rd8 30. Nf6+ Kg7 31. Kd3 Rxd4+ 32. Kxd4 Kxf6

 

33. b4 Ke6 34. Kc5 Kd7 0-1



This Week In Chess


On April 25th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its April Quick (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. AQ


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1771 W8 D4 W2 W3 W5 W7 5.5 $24.00 1st

2 Paul D Anderson 1986 L6 W11 L1 W4 W3 W5 4.0 $8.00 2nd

3 Mark McGough 1683 W10 W9 W6 L1 L2 W11 4.0 $8.00 2nd

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1617 W11 D1 L9 L2 W6 W8 3.5

5 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1307 L9 W10 W8 W6 L1 L2 3.0 $11.00 U1500

6 Michael Smith II 1569 W2 W8 L3 L5 L4 W10 3.0

7 Michael W Sandau 1023 H--- U--- U--- W10 W11 L1 2.5

8 Dean W Brown 1400 L1 L6 L5 W11 W10 L4 2.0

9 Peter Barlay 1703 W5 L3 W4 U--- U--- U--- 2.0

10 Clinton D Eads 1168 L3 L5 W11 L7 L8 L6 1.0

11 Douglas N Clark 496 L4 L2 L10 L8 L7 L3 0.0

Chessnuts

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 25, 2017 at 5:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from last night.  I finally had a free Monday night and decided to check out a new chess club that had contacted me back in January.  Robin Fields sent me this message:


Chess Players,

As a 35 year resident of Colorado my family and friends recently decided to start a public chess club in Monument, CO for players at all skill levels. As you might know we are a small community and need either free or very low cost used chess equipment.

We currently meet at the Pikes Peak Library in Monument ...

Please visit us when you're in our neighborhood.

Thanks and we hope to see you in future tournaments.


As the only chess news source in southern Colorado, I feel it is my duty to investigate these changes to the chess scene and report on them...eventually.  By March, I still had not visited the club but sent a message to Robin to see how the club was doing.  He replied:


We are now meeting on the second (today) and fourth Monday of each month with the Chessnuts club at the Senior Center at the Lewis Palmer High School across from the YMCA. Enter from the Jackson Creek stop light. The Center is just south of the High School. Meeting time is from 5-9pm.


Well, it took another month to get up there, but I finally made it.  I didn't get to meet Robin.  The only 2 people at the club were the Chessnuts, a couple of retired military gentlemen who live in King's Deer.  They were very friendly and happy to have a visitor.  I was going to keep my chess background a mystery until we played, but they asked for my email address and the cat was out of the bag.


I played the entire club that evening and went unbeaten.  However, I was quite impressed with their fighting spirit.  My advantages were wiped out both times, and I had to overcome some very drawish endgames to claim my victories.


It was a fun evening.  I am hoping it has laid some groundwork for collaboration between the Chessnuts and the Colorado Springs Chess Club.


Here is the decisive moment from my second game.


Black to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203971698


Chessnuts

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=110213


[Event "Chessnuts Club"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.04.24"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Hartley, Mick"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[PlyCount "68"]

[EventDate "2017.04.24"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. e4 e5 2. Bc4 Nf6 3. d3 Bc5 4. h3 O-O 5. b3 c6 6. Bb2 d5 7. exd5 cxd5 8. d4

exd4 9. Bd3 Nc6 10. a3 Ne4 11. Qf3 Ne5 12. Qf4 Bd6 13. Qc1 Qh4 14. g3 Nxg3 15.

fxg3 Qxg3+ 16. Kd1 Re8 17. Ne2 Qf3 18. Re1 Bxh3 19. Bxd4 Nxd3 20. cxd3 Bg4 21.

Nbc3 Bg3 22. Qg5 g6 23. Qh6 Qxd3+ 24. Qd2 Qxd2+ 25. Kxd2 Bxe1+ 26. Rxe1 a6 27.

Nxd5 Rxe2+ 28. Rxe2 Bxe2 29. Kxe2 Rd8 30. Nf6+ Kg7 31. Kd3 Rxd4+ 32. Kxd4 Kxf6

33. b4 Ke6 34. Kc5 Kd7 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 18th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its April Quick (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. AQ


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 1683 W7 W3 W4 3.0

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 1771 W9 D6 W8 2.5

3 Peter Barlay 1703 W5 L1 W6 2.0

4 Michael Smith II 1569 W8 W9 L1 2.0

5 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1307 L3 W7 W9 2.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1617 W10 D2 L3 1.5

7 Clinton D Eads 1168 L1 L5 W10 1.0

8 Paul D Anderson 1986 L4 W10 L2 1.0

9 Dean W Brown 1400 L2 L4 L5 0.0

10 Douglas N Clark 496 L6 L8 L7 0.0


Thanks To You

By Ann Davies


After perusing the upcoming tournaments today, I realized there was a myriad of opportunities to play competitive chess in Colorado. The tournament landscape has changed dramatically thanks to the efforts of organizers, directors and chess clubs.  I wanted you to know that your commitment and hard work does not go unnoticed and is very much appreciated.


If I have neglected to properly thank someone, please pass this on to them.


Cheers, Ann Davies

The Defibrillator

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 17, 2017 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game is my attempt to resurrect the Jim Burden Award for 2017.  LM Brian Wall created this award back in 2005 and promised us, "I will post all entries and announce the winner every April 1."  While Brian is one of the most creative chess authors and organizers, he is not the most discipline fellow.


His creativity has finally helped him get the recognition he deserves.  You can see him in the 2017 Spring issue of American Chess Magazine.




However, as I was playing my typical April Fools joke on Matthew Hansen about a fortnight ago, I realized I had missed the 2017 Jim Burden Award winner.  As I looked through my spam folder to find my Brian Walls emails, I could not find any information on the current winner.


Did Brian forget again?


In 2010, I was still trying to win this award and had to select the winners for 2007 and 2008 just to get this thing back on track.  Now, it appears that the award has gone back into cardiac arrest.


So, here is a game from Dean Brown and Alex Bozhenov that I like to call "The Defibrillator!"


I am counting on Brian's other promise that the winning game is "chosen mostly for humorous content."  This game had Peter Barlay cracking up at the board and Kathy Schneider biting her fingernails.


It all started in this position.  Dean found the shocking move and awoke Alex from his coma.


White to move



You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203944150


While Dean didn't actually get the Queen, he should have.  Saving the Queen is actually worse, and Dean continued to build on his lead until he was close to +15.  However, by that time both players got in time pressure and the score sheet went flatline.


However, I could see that the game was not the peaceful transition into the loss column for Alex.  I was sitting across the tournament hall, but it was clear from Dean's reactions that Alex's position was coming back to life.


Peter Barlay does impresssions of different Colorado chess players as they are losing.  He showed me his Dean Brown mannerism, where Dean picks up a piece, does not place it down, but rather brings it closer for inspection with a look on his face that says, "Why, on earth, did I pick up this piece?"


Now, Dean was living it out, with a Bishop in his hand, tapping it against his head, trying to find a square for it.  Soon a Rook was gone, as well as several Pawns.  Finally, the stone was rolled away and Alex came out with the win.


The Defibrillator

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=110131


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.04.11"]

[Round "4.3"]

[White "Brown, Dean"]

[Black "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1517"]

[BlackElo "1914"]

[PlyCount "92"]

[EventDate "2017.04.04"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Na5 4. Nf3 a6 5. Be2

b5 6. b3 Bb7 7. d3 e6 8. O-O Qc7 9. g3 f6 10. Bb2 h5 11. Nh4 O-O-O 12. Bxh5 g5

13. Ng6 Rh6 14. Nxf8 Rxf8 15. Bf3 Ne7 16. Ne2 e5 17. Kg2 f5 18. h3 Rfh8 19. Rh1

g4 20. hxg4 Rxh1 21. Qxh1 Rxh1 22. Rxh1 Qd6 23. gxf5 Qf6 24. g4 Nac6 25. c3 b4

26. c4 Nd8 27. Bc1 Nf7 28. Rh5 Qd6 29. Be3 Kc7 30. Nc1 Nc6 31. g5 Ne7 32. Bg4

Nd8 33. Rh6 Ne6 34. fxe6 dxe6 35. Rxe6 Qd8 36. Bxc5 Nc6 37. Rf6 Qg8 38. g6 Nd8

39. Bd6+ Kb6 40. Bxe5+ Bc6 41. Bd4+ Kb7 42. c5 a5 43. Rd6 a4 44. g7 Nf7 45. Re6

Ng5 46. Re7+ Ka8 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 11th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its Cabin Fever Reliever (4SS, G/45;d10).


Standings. CFR


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize


1 Richard Buchanan 2000 W6 W2 W3 W8 4.0 $24.00 1st

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1832 W5 L1 W6 W7 3.0 $16.00 2nd

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 1914 W7 L4 L1 W6 2.0

4 Mark McGough 1848 W9 W3 U--- U--- 2.0

5 Clinton D Eads 1168 L2 D9 L8 W10 1.5 $10.00 U1800

6 Dean W Brown 1517 L1 W7 L2 L3 1.0

7 Michael Smith II 1332 L3 L6 W10 L2 1.0

8 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1507 U--- U--- W5 L1 1.0

9 Scott Ch Williams 1273 L4 D5 U--- U--- 0.5

10 Daniel J Rupp 1013 U--- U--- L7 L5 0.0

He Mate Me

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 10, 2017 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Tim Brennan


Friends, Romans, Countrymen:


It is Tim Brennan here, and I am very happy to be back again for another annual installment of "Tim Brennan week" on Paul Anderson's excellent Colorado Springs Chess News email newsletter!


Thanks Paul for having me!


It is nice to take a break from being a magazine cover model, and be able to focus on writing instead of always being treated like a piece of meat!


Today I would like to share a game that I played against Daoud Zupa at the Denver Chess Club in January 2017.


I have known Daoud for many years.  I used to live in downtown Denver (9th and Lincoln) in the "Capitol Hill" area in the early 2000s.  The Denver Chess Club at that time met at the VFW Post 1, on 9th and Bannock (which has since been torn down and replaced with luxury condos).


The VFW was a bit of a dump.  This was back when people were allowed to smoke indoors, and the whole place smelled like an ash tray.  There was a bar area inside that looked like "Moe's" from the Simpsons.  The toilets were always getting clogged, and the owner was always kicking us out (a common and oft-repeated theme with Colorado Chess clubs).


Daoud also lived on capitol hill, and we could both walk there.  At the time, I was only rated in the 1300s, and he was a very strong player.  I also used to see Daoud a lot on the Auraria Campus where both of us were taking computer science classes at the University of Colorado.


Although we have crossed paths and played in many of the same tournaments over the years, I have rarely been paired against him.  Sometimes there are players like this, that you see all the time, but for whatever reason rarely get paired against.  DuWayne Langseth is another person that falls in this category for me.


But during the January Denver Chess Club monthly tournament I did get paired against Daoud.


Two weeks prior, I had beaten Rudy Tia in one of the best games I had ever played, which I wrote about in my Tactics Time email newsletter "Cover Me", which I sent out on January 5, 2017 (http://archive.aweber.com/tacticstime/MLlEy/h/Tactics_Time_Chess_Newsletter_.htm).  In that game I sacrificed an exchange and a knight to set up a mating attack, and mated Tia on move 23.


Daoud had seen that game, and said before our game, "I don't want to play the French against you, after seeing what you did to Rudy Tia!"


Our game started off kind of slow, with an early trade of queens.  I realized around move 22 that I could win a pawn, which I did.   My plan was then to trade down into a winning endgame.  I activated my king, moving him towards the center, and got a passed pawn.  All textbook.


Unfortunately for me, Daoud went into "NOTHING IS OVER" mode and found a brilliant mating net!


Black to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203920581


Normally I don't like losing to an opponent's tactic, but when it is a brilliant one like this, it actually makes me quite happy.  I love a beautiful tactic, even when I am on the receiving end.  After the game, I shook Daoud's hand and congratulated him on the brilliant move 41...Rxg7!! which I didn't see coming at all.


Thanks again Paul for having me!  Keep up the outstanding work that you do!


Your friend, Tim


P.S. If you haven't already, check out the Tactics Time books on amazon, available in both Kindle and paperback formats!


http://amzn.to/2oPr8Xl


He Mate Me

http://www.viewchess.com/cbreader/2017/4/9/Game1299959937.html


[Event "Denver Chess Club"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.01.17"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Brennan, Tim"]

[Black "Zupa, Daoud"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1864"]

[BlackElo "1999"]

[PlyCount "84"]

[EventDate "2017.01.03"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 a6 3. a4 Nc6 4. f4 d6 5. Bc4 Nf6 6. Nf3 e6 7. d3 d5 8. Ba2 dxe4

9. dxe4 Qxd1+ 10. Kxd1 b6 11. h3 Bb7 12. e5 Nh5 13. Ne2 Nd4 14. Nfxd4 cxd4 15.

Rh2 g5 16. g4 Nxf4 17. Nxf4 gxf4 18. Bxf4 O-O-O 19. Ke2 Bc5 20. Bc4 Kc7 21. Bd3

Kc6 22. Bg5 Rd7 23. Bf6 Re8 24. Bxh7 Be7 25. Be4+ Kc5 26. Bxb7 Bxf6 27. exf6

Rxb7 28. Kd3 e5 29. Re1 b5 30. axb5 Rxb5 31. b3 Kb4 32. h4 Rc5 33. Ke4 a5 34.

Rd1 Rec8 35. Rdd2 Kb5 36. g5 Rg8 37. Rdg2 Kc6 38. h5 Kd6 39. g6 Ke6 40. g7 Rc3

41. Re2 Rxg7 42. fxg7 f5# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 4th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club began its Cabin Fever Reliever (4SS, G/45;d10).


Standings. CFR


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Richard Buchanan 2000 W5 W3 2.0

2 Mark McGough 1848 W6 W4 2.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1832 W7 L1 1.0

4 Aleksand Bozhenov 1914 W8 L2 1.0

5 Dean W Brown 1517 L1 W8 1.0

6 Scott Ch Williams 1273 L2 D7 0.5

7 Clinton D Eads 1168 L3 D6 0.5

8 Michael Smith II 1332 L4 L5 0.0

Every Loss Is A Lesson

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 5, 2017 at 7:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the beginning of my chess career.  The time was 1998, and I had been playing tournament chess for 2 months with 11 games under my belt.  I traveled to Pueblo for my first out-of-town event, run by Ken Schwartz and Roy Heath.


I had 6 wins and 5 losses going into this game and a provisional rating of 1618.  I had beaten a 1900 player twice already.  So, it wasn't like I couldn't play.  I just couldn't play consistently.  I had very little practical experience, and I was about to get a lesson in the Greek Gift Sacrifice.


I didn't know the Greek Gift Sacrifice then.  But I learned it that day.  I learned it the hard way:  losing over the board to get knocked out of 1st place.  And I haven't forgotten it.


If you haven't heard of it, then see if you can find the best move in this position.


White to move



You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203901637


You may learn much more from a game you lose than from a game you win. You will have to lose hundreds of games before becoming a good player.

Jose Raul Capablanca, 3rd World Chess Champion


Well, it has been almost 20 years since that loss, and now I am teaching chess.  I was reminded of this game during a lesson recently.  I was preaching about the most important aspect of chess:  the bigger army wins!


Unfortunately, during one of the games with my student, I get a similar positon to that fateful loss.  Now I am faced with the choice of driving home the point about not being careless with your pieces or prematurely delving into the advanced concept that for every rule there is an exception.


Even in a lesson I want to win.  So, it was time to teach about Sacrifice and Compensation. 


Here I have ignored the simple recapture of Black's Bishop and offered the gift of my Bishop.  Black's King has opended the walls of the city and unknowingly allowed my army easy access to plunder the town, much like the Greek's sack of Troy using the wooden horse.  However, getting in the door is just half the battle.  One still has to go in for the kill.


White to move



You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203901638


Every Loss Is A Lesson

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=110055

 

[Event "Pueblo April"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1998.04.25"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Christie, Kyle"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B15"]

[WhiteElo "1763"]

[BlackElo "1718"]

[PlyCount "23"]

[EventDate "1998.04.25"]

[TimeControl "1800"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 e6 4. e5 Bb4 5. Nf3 Ne7 6.

Bd3 Nd7 7. O-O O-O 8. Bxh7+ Kxh7 9. Ng5+ Kg6 10. Qg4 Rh8 11. Nxe6+ Kh7 12.

Qxg7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 28th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club concluded its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90: MS90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1923 W9 W3 W7 L2 3.0 $20.00 1st

2 Paul D Anderson 2041 L7 W5 W11 W1 3.0 $20.00 1st

3 Mark McGough 1848 W4 L1 W8 D5 2.5

4 Michael Smith II 1332 L3 W9 D5 W11 2.5 $5.00 GOW

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1802 W10 L2 D4 D3 2.0

6 Peter Barlay 1949 W8 U--- U--- W10 2.0

7 Calvin P Dejong 1754 W2 H--- L1 U--- 1.5

8 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1528 L6 W10 L3 L9 1.0 $5.00 GOW

9 Dean W Brown 1467 L1 L4 L10 W8 1.0

10 Scott Ch Williams 1231 L5 L8 W9 L6 1.0 $5.00 GOW

11 Sam Bridle 1800 H--- H--- L2 L4 1.0

Wall's Comet

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 27, 2017 at 5:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

It just could be the end of the world as we know it!


Life Master Brian Wall has made the cover of a national magazine, American Chess Magazine, as co-author with NM Lior Lapid and put Colorado on the chess map.




Last time Brian received so much attention was for his discovery of a rare occurance in the chess world.  It was like a sign in the sky of terrible times ahead.  A 1300 tore through the Wyoming Open like a fireball!


Wall's comet first appeared on May 5, 2006 and was described in LM Brian Wall's article:  The Day 1300s Ruled the Earth.  The comet has the effect of increasing the playing strength of 1300s exponentially.  However, the duration of the effect is only short term, and the 1300s soon return to their rightful place as the butt of chess jokes.


Since it has been over 10 years when the comet last appeared, many new players may not be aware of the firestorm that was set off during its last visit.  Randy Reynolds was the editor of the Colorado Chess Informant and an active tournament chess player at that time.  Now, he has decided to leave chess, and I thought it would be nice to relive his most controversial editorial choice (see below).

 

And now, the comet has returned!


The 1300s have taken over the March Swiss 90 at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  Matthew Hansen (1300) scored his first win over a National Master.  Mike Smith (1332) was winning against an 1800 when an eclipse blocked the comet and he settled for the draw.  Finally, Scott Williams (1365 peak) set up this mating problem against his most common foe, Dean Brown.  What would you announce?

 

Black to mate

 

 

You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203865296

 

Wall's Comet

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=110018

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.03.21"]

[Round "3.5"]

[White "Brown, Dean"]

[Black "Williams, Scott"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B30"]

[WhiteElo "1467"]

[BlackElo "1231"]

[PlyCount "74"]

[EventDate "2017.03.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Nf3 a6 5. Bxc6

bxc6 6. O-O g6 7. d4 d5 8. exd5 cxd5 9. dxc5 Bb7 10. Be3 Bg7 11. Bd4 O-O 12.

Re1 Rc8 13. Qe2 Re8 14. Qe5 Nh5 15. Qe3 Bxd4 16. Qxd4 e6 17. b4 Ng7 18. g4 Rf8

19. Ne2 Bc6 20. a4 Ra8 21. Ng3 Bb7 22. h4 Bc8 23. g5 Nf5 24. Nxf5 exf5 25. Re5

Be6 26. Rae1 Qd7 27. Ra1 Rfe8 28. Ne1 f4 29. Qxf4 Bh3 30. Nd3 Bf5 31. Qd4 Bxd3

32. cxd3 Rxe5 33. Qxe5 Re8 34. Qc3 Qg4+ 35. Kf1 Qxh4 36. f3 Qh3+ 37. Kg1 Re2 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

 

On March 21st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30) with 5 boards.

 

Standings. March Swiss 90: MS90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1923 W11 W2 W4 3.0

2 Mark McGough 1848 W6 L1 W7 2.0

3 Paul D Anderson 2041 L4 W5 W9 2.0

4 Calvin P Dejong 1754 W3 H--- L1 1.5

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1802 W8 L3 D6 1.5

6 Michael Smith II 1332 L2 W11 D5 1.5 GOW $5.00

7 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1528 L10 W8 L2 1.0 GOW $5.00

8 Scott Ch Williams 1231 L5 L7 W11 1.0

9 Sam Bridle 1800 H--- H--- L3 1.0

10 Peter Barlay 1949 W7 U--- U--- 1.0

11 Dean W Brown 1467 L1 L6 L8 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $24.00, 2nd $16.00


1300 Jokes Reloaded

By Randy Reynolds


Paul Anderson, author of the football-pre-empted Colorado Springs Chess Newsletter, was the only one who submitted some new 1300 jokes for this issue. I guess no one had anything funny to say about Master players, either, since nothing came in from that front (at least, nothing that could pass the censorship board). Here are just a few of Paul’s creations:


How does a 1300 make a sacrifice?

He loans out his chess clock.


How does a 1300 find a fork?

He looks next to the spoons.


What do you call a 1300 with a minor piece advantage (+3)?

Slightly worse.


What is a 1300’s favorite opening as white?

d5...oh wait, the board is backward...let me turn this around, and then I can tell you.


Why are 1300 jokes like potato chips?

You can’t stop with one.


You can view many more in the July 2006 Colorado Chess Informant:


http://www.coloradochess.com/informant/jul2006cci.pdf#page=12

My Unbelievable Bracket

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 20, 2017 at 4:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from round 2 of the March Swiss 90 between Mike Smith and Dean Brown.  Mike is a newcomer to the club, but he was able to pull off the upset over the oldtimer.  I think Mike harnessed his inner Wagner and played a little chin music for Dean, as he wiffed with his Louisville slugger.


You see, Mike joined my March Madness group, and, as I looked at his bracket, I could tell he has a tendency to swing for the seats.  He has bypassed all 12 of the top seeds and picked West Virginia to win it all.  So far, he is not connecting with all the upsets, but he was able to get Michigan over Louisville.


Mike is still doing better than Matthew Hansen.  I also asked Matthew to create a bracket for my group.  However, Matthew is like a chess engine running on a super-computer in the cloud.  He sounds smart, but he is only as good as the program, and his program is way too literal.  Next time, I am going to ask Matthew, "Would you like to FILL in a bracket?"


Matthew's Unbelievable Bracket is aptly named.  When I looked at it, I could not believe a chess player would submit an empty bracket.  It reminded me of the Far Side comic about the student leaning, with all his might, on the door of the School For The Gifted, failing to see the "PULL" sign.

 

Here Mike didn't fail to see the Cinderella move and take down the seasoned veteran.

 

White to move


 

You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203836848

 

My Unbelievable Bracket

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109946

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.03.14"]

[Round "2.4"]

[White "Smith, Mike"]

[Black "Brown, Dean"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B27"]

[WhiteElo "1332"]

[BlackElo "1467"]

[PlyCount "59"]

[EventDate "2017.03.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bc4 Nc6 4. c3 Bg7 5. d4

cxd4 6. cxd4 d6 7. O-O Qc7 8. Bb5 Bd7 9. Nc3 Nf6 10. e5 dxe5 11. dxe5 Nxe5 12.

Bf4 Nxf3+ 13. Qxf3 Qb6 14. Bxd7+ Nxd7 15. Nd5 Qd8 16. Nc7+ Kf8 17. Ne6+ fxe6

18. Bc7+ Ke8 19. Bxd8 Rxd8 20. Qxb7 Kf7 21. Rad1 Nc5 22. Qxa7 Nd3 23. Qa6 Nxb2

24. Rxd8 Rxd8 25. Re1 Rd6 26. Qe2 Ke8 27. h3 Kd7 28. Qb5+ Kd8 29. Rc1 Nd3 30.

Qb8+ 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On March 14th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30) with 4 boards.

 

Standings: March Swiss 90

 

# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Aleksand Bozhenov 1923 W9 W3 2.0

2 Calvin P Dejong 1754 W4 H--- 1.5

3 Mark McGough 1848 W8 L1 1.0

4 Paul D Anderson 2041 L2 W7 1.0

5 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1528 L6 W10 1.0

6 Peter Barlay 1949 W5 U--- 1.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 1802 W10 L4 1.0

8 Michael Smith II 1332 L3 W9 1.0

9 Dean W Brown 1467 L1 L8 0.0

10 Scott Ch Williams 1231 L7 L5 0.0


Colorado Springs Open Games

By Buck Buchanan


[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Brian Wall"]

[Black "Jason Lee"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B30"]

[WhiteElo "2279"]

[BlackElo "1610"]

[PlyCount "41"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. b4 Nxb4 4. c3 Nc6 5. d4 d6 6. Bc4 cxd4 7. cxd4 Nf6 8.

Nc3 e6 9. O-O Be7 10. d5 Na5 11. dxe6 fxe6 12. Bd3 e5 13. Nd5 Nc6 14. Ng5 h6

15. Nxf6+ Bxf6 16. Qh5+ Kd7 17. Nf7 Qe8 18. Ba3 Rf8 19. Bc4 Ne7 20. Qd1 d5 21.

Bxd5 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "DuWayne Langseth"]

[Black "Josh Williams"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "1917"]

[BlackElo "1510"]

[PlyCount "65"]

 

1. d4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. f4 e6 4. Bd3 c5 5. c3 Nc6 6. Nf3 b6 7. O-O Bb7 8. Nbd2

Be7 9. Qe2 Rc8 10. Ne5 Qc7 11. Ndf3 Ne4 12. Bxe4 dxe4 13. Nd2 Nxe5 14. fxe5 Bg5

15. Nc4 O-O 16. Nd6 Rcd8 17. Qg4 Bh6 18. Nxe4 Kh8 19. Nd6 Ba8 20. e4 Bxc1 21.

Raxc1 Rd7 22. Qxe6 cxd4 23. cxd4 Qxc1 24. Qxd7 Qe3+ 25. Kh1 Qe2 26. Nxf7+ Kg8

27. Nh6+ gxh6 28. Qe6+ Kg7 29. Qe7+ Kg6 30. Qxf8 Bxe4 31. Rf6+ Kg5 32. Qxh6+

Kg4 33. Rf4# 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Alex Mekonnen"]

[Black "Earle Wikle"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C01"]

[WhiteElo "1528"]

[BlackElo "2021"]

[PlyCount "82"]

 

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bg5 Bd6 6. Bd3 Bg4 7. O-O O-O 8.

c3 Nbd7 9. Nbd2 c6 10. Qc2 Qc7 11. h3 Bxf3 12. Nxf3 h6 13. Be3 Rae8 14. Qc1 Ne4

15. Bxh6 gxh6 16. Qxh6 Re6 17. Qh5 Ndf6 18. Qf5 Nh7 19. Nh4 Bh2+ 20. Kh1 Nhg5

21. Qg4 Qf4 22. Bxe4 Rxe4 23. g3 Qxg4 24. hxg4 Bxg3 25. fxg3 Rxg4 26. Nf5 Kh7

27. Kg2 Re8 28. Rh1+ Kg6 29. Nh4+ Kf6 30. Raf1+ Ke6 31. Rf4 Rxf4 32. gxf4 Ne4

33. Rh2 Rg8+ 34. Kf3 Rg3+ 35. Ke2 Rg1 36. a3 Rb1 37. Kd3 Rf1 38. f5+ Kf6 39.

Ke2 Ng3+ 40. Ke3 Nxf5+ 41. Nxf5 Kxf5 {and Black won (scoresheet incomplete).}

0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Will Wolf"]

[Black "Alex Freeman"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "D01"]

[WhiteElo "1339"]

[BlackElo "1848"]

[PlyCount "78"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Bg5 Bf5 4. f3 Nbd7 5. Nxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Be6 7. c4 c6 8.

cxd5 cxd5 9. Be3 Qb6 10. Qd2 Rc8 11. Bd3 g6 12. Ne2 Bg7 13. O-O O-O 14. e5 f6

15. f4 Nb8 16. f5 gxf5 17. Bxf5 Bxf5 18. Rxf5 fxe5 19. dxe5 Qe6 20. Nd4 Qd7 21.

Rh5 Qg4 22. Rg5 Qd7 23. e6 Qa4 24. Rxg7+ Kxg7 25. Bh6+ Kh8 26. b3 Qe8 27. Bxf8

Qxf8 28. Rf1 Qg8 29. Nf5 Qxe6 30. Qd4+ Qf6 31. Qxd5 Nc6 32. Ng3 Qd4+ 33. Qxd4+

Nxd4 34. Rf7 Re8 35. Nf5 Nxf5 36. Rxf5 Kg7 37. Kf2 Kg6 38. Rf3 e5 39. Ke3 Re6 {

A good fight.} 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Sam Bridle"]

[Black "Brian Wall"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A02"]

[WhiteElo "1800"]

[BlackElo "2279"]

[PlyCount "40"]

 

1. f4 e5 2. fxe5 Nc6 3. Nf3 d6 4. exd6 Bxd6 5. d4 Nf6 6. e3 Ng4 7. Qe2 O-O 8.

Nc3 Re8 9. Bd2 Nxd4 10. Nxd4 Qh4+ 11. Kd1 Nf2+ 12. Kc1 Nxh1 13. g3 Nxg3 14.

hxg3 Qxg3 15. Qd3 Qg1 16. Nd1 Bg4 17. Be2 Rad8 18. Bxg4 Qxg4 19. c3 Be5 20. Qe2

Rxd4 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Chris Peterson"]

[Black "Brian Rountree"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "C52"]

[WhiteElo "2261"]

[BlackElo "1802"]

[PlyCount "61"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. O-O Nf6 7. d4 exd4 8. e5

Ne4 9. Ba3 {(Staunton's HANDBOOK gives 9 Qb3, 0-0 10 Ba3, d6 11 cxd4, Bb6;

12 Qe3, Bf5; 13 Bd5 with advantage to White.)} d5 10. exd6 Nxd6 11. Re1+ Be6

12. Bxe6 fxe6 13. Rxe6+ Kd7 {Diagram [#]} 14. cxd4 Kxe6 15. d5+ Kd7 16. dxc6+

bxc6 17. Ne5+ Kc8 18. Qg4+ Kb7 19. Nd2 Bxd2 20. Rb1+ Nb5 21. Rxb5+ cxb5 22.

Qe4+ Ka6 23. Qc6+ Ka5 24. Qb7 Qc8 25. Qd5 Rd8 26. Bb4+ $1 Bxb4 27. Nc4+ Ka4 28.

Nb2+ Ka5 29. Nc4+ Ka4 30. Nb2+ Ka5 31. Nc4+ 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Gary Bagstad"]

[Black "Rudy Tia"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C00"]

[WhiteElo "1734"]

[BlackElo "2072"]

[PlyCount "52"]

 

1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 g6 4. g3 Bg7 5. Bg2 Ne7 6. Ne2 c5 7. c3 Nbc6 8. O-O e5

9. f4 Be6 10. a3 Qb6 11. Kh1 O-O-O 12. exd5 Bxd5 13. Bxd5 Nxd5 14. Nc4 Qc7 15.

fxe5 Nxe5 16. Nxe5 Bxe5 17. Nf4 Ne7 18. Qf3 h5 19. Ne2 h4 20. Bf4 hxg3 21. Bxg3

Nf5 22. Kg2 Nh4+ 23. Bxh4 Rxh4 24. Ng3 Qd7 25. Rh1 Qh3+ 26. Kf2 Rf4 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Rhett Langseth"]

[Black "David Logan"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B40"]

[WhiteElo "2071"]

[BlackElo "1750"]

[PlyCount "103"]

 

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c3 e6 3. d3 d5 4. Nbd2 c5 5. e4 Nc6 6. Qc2 Be7 7. Be2 O-O 8. O-O

b6 9. Re1 Bb7 10. Bf1 Rc8 11. h3 Qc7 12. b3 Bd6 13. Qd1 Rfe8 14. Qe2 e5 15. Nh4

d4 16. c4 g6 17. Ndf3 Bf8 18. Nh2 Qe7 19. g3 Nh5 20. Ng2 Rc7 21. g4 Ng7 22. g5

Ne6 23. h4 f6 24. Qg4 fxg5 25. hxg5 Bc8 26. Qh4 Bg7 27. Be2 Rf8 28. f3 Nb4 29.

Rf1 Qd6 30. Kf2 Rcf7 31. Rh1 Re8 32. Ng4 Nf8 33. Bd2 Qe6 34. Kg3 a5 35. a3 Nc6

36. Raf1 Bd7 37. Rb1 Rb8 38. b4 axb4 39. axb4 Nxb4 40. Bxb4 cxb4 41. Rxb4 Qd6

42. Rhb1 Ne6 43. R4b2 Nf4 44. Nxf4 exf4+ 45. Kf2 Bxg4 46. Qxg4 Be5 47. Bf1 Rfb7

48. Bh3 b5 49. cxb5 Qc5 50. Qe6+ Kg7 51. b6 Rxb6 52. Rxb6 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "David Hufnagel"]

[Black "Daniel Herman"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A41"]

[WhiteElo "1704"]

[BlackElo "2070"]

[PlyCount "101"]

 

1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 Bg4 3. c4 Bxf3 4. exf3 e5 5. dxe5 dxe5 6. Qxd8+ Kxd8 7. Bd3 Nc6

8. O-O Nge7 9. a3 Nd4 10. Be3 Nef5 11. Rd1 Ke8 12. b4 a5 13. Nd2 Rd8 14. c5

Nxe3 15. fxe3 Ne6 16. Nc4 axb4 17. axb4 f6 18. Bf5 Rxd1+ 19. Rxd1 Nd8 20. Be4

g6 21. Na5 c6 22. Nc4 Ne6 23. Nd6+ Bxd6 24. Rxd6 Ke7 25. Bd3 Ra8 26. Bc4 Nc7

27. Rd1 Ra3 28. e4 Rc3 29. Bg8 h6 30. Bh7 g5 31. Bf5 Ne6 32. Rd6 Nf8 33. Bc8

Rb3 34. Bxb7 Rxb4 35. Bxc6 Rc4 36. Rd5 Ne6 37. Rd7+ Kf8 38. Bd5 Rc1+ 39. Kf2

Nxc5 40. Rf7+ Ke8 41. Rxf6 Nd3+ 42. Ke3 Nf4 43. Rxh6 $2 Rc2 44. Rh8+ Ke7 45.

Rh7+ Kf6 46. Rf7+ Kg6 47. Rxf4 gxf4+ 48. Kd3 Rxg2 49. Be6 Rxh2 50. Bg4 Rg2 51.

Kc4 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Ron Rossi"]

[Black "Neil Bhavikatti"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B40"]

[WhiteElo "1901"]

[BlackElo "1659"]

[PlyCount "136"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. f3 d5 7. Bb5+ Bd7 8. e5

Ng8 9. Be3 Bxb5 10. Ndxb5 a6 11. Nd4 Qc7 12. O-O Qxe5 13. Re1 Qc7 14. Nxd5 Qd6

15. Nxb4 Qxb4 16. Nf5 Nf6 17. Nxg7+ Ke7 18. c3 Qb5 19. a4 Qc6 20. Bd4 Nbd7 21.

Nf5+ Kf8 22. Ng3 Rg8 23. Qd2 Rg6 24. Qe2 Re8 25. Bxf6 Nxf6 26. Kh1 Kg8 27. a5

Kh8 28. Rad1 Reg8 29. Qe5 Qa4 30. Rd4 Qb5 31. Qxb5 axb5 32. Rb4 Rg5 33. Re2 Ra8

34. Kg1 Rxa5 35. Ne4 Nxe4 36. Rexe4 Kg7 37. h4 Rd5 38. Kf2 Rd2+ 39. Re2 Rd5 40.

Ree4 Rd2+ 41. Re2 Rd5 42. f4 Ra4 43. Ree4 Rd2+ 44. Kf3 Ra2 45. Rxb5 Raxb2 46.

Rxb2 Rxb2 47. Rc4 Rb3 48. Ke4 b5 49. Rc7 b4 50. cxb4 Rxb4+ 51. Kf3 Rb3+ 52. Ke4

Rg3 53. Rc2 Rg4 54. h5 Rh4 55. g3 Rxh5 56. Ra2 Rb5 57. Kf3 Kg6 58. Ra7 e5 59.

fxe5 Rxe5 60. Rb7 f6 61. Ra7 h6 62. Ra3 Kg5 63. Ra8 Rf5+ 64. Ke4 Kg4 65. Rg8+

Rg5 66. Rf8 f5+ 67. Ke3 Kxg3 68. Rf6 Rh5 {Black won - rest of scoresheet

unclear.} 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Teah Williams"]

[Black "Sara Herman"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B70"]

[WhiteElo "1663"]

[BlackElo "1894"]

[PlyCount "104"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be2 Bg7 7. O-O O-O 8.

Bg5 Nc6 9. Nb3 a5 10. f4 Qb6+ 11. Kh1 a4 12. Bxf6 exf6 13. Nd5 Qd8 14. Nd2 f5

15. exf5 Bxf5 16. c3 a3 17. b3 Be6 18. Nc4 Ne7 19. Nxe7+ Qxe7 20. Qd2 b5 21.

Ne3 b4 22. cxb4 Bxa1 23. Rxa1 Rfe8 24. Bb5 Qf6 25. Rd1 Bxb3 26. Bxe8 Bxd1 27.

Bc6 Rc8 28. Nd5 Qa1 29. Qe1 Kg7 30. b5 Qd4 31. Qc3 Qxc3 32. Nxc3 Bc2 33. Kg1

Bd3 34. g4 Bxb5 35. Nxb5 Rxc6 36. Nxa3 Ra6 37. Nb5 d5 38. a3 Ra5 39. Nd4 Rxa3

40. Kf2 Ra4 41. Ke3 Ra2 42. Nf3 f5 43. g5 h6 44. h4 Ra3+ 45. Ke2 Ra4 46. Ke3

Re4+ 47. Kd3 Rxf4 48. Ke3 Re4+ 49. Kd3 hxg5 50. hxg5 f4 51. Kd2 Re3 52. Nh2 Rg3

0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Alex Freeman"]

[Black "Paul Anderson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D02"]

[WhiteElo "1848"]

[BlackElo "2041"]

[PlyCount "92"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. Bf4 Bg7 4. h3 O-O 5. Nbd2 d5 6. e3 b6 7. Bd3 Bb7 8. c3

Nbd7 9. Qe2 Ne4 10. O-O-O Re8 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. dxe5 Nc5 13. Bc2 Ba6 14. Qf3

Nd3+ 15. Kb1 Nxf4 16. exf4 c6 17. g4 Qc7 18. h4 Rad8 19. h5 g5 20. fxg5 Qxe5

21. g6 fxg6 22. hxg6 Qf6 23. gxh7+ Kh8 24. Qxf6 exf6 25. Rde1 Re2 26. Rxe2 Bxe2

27. Bf5 d4 28. cxd4 Rxd4 29. Nb3 Rd8 30. Kc1 Bd3 31. Bxd3 Rxd3 32. Kc2 Rf3 33.

Rf1 c5 34. Nd2 Rf4 35. f3 Kxh7 36. Re1 Bf8 37. Re8 Bd6 38. b3 b5 39. Ra8 c4 40.

Rxa7+ Kg6 41. Rb7 cxb3+ 42. axb3 Bb4 43. Rxb5 Bxd2 44. Kxd2 Rxf3 45. b4 Rg3 46.

Rb8 Rxg4 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Gene Lucas"]

[Black "Justin Alter"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "E53"]

[WhiteElo "1551"]

[BlackElo "2019"]

[PlyCount "102"]

 

1. d4 e6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 b6 5. Nf3 Ba6 6. Bd3 O-O 7. O-O d5 8. cxd5

Bxd3 9. Qxd3 exd5 10. a3 Bxc3 11. bxc3 c5 12. dxc5 bxc5 13. c4 dxc4 14. Qxc4

Nbd7 15. Bb2 Rb8 16. Rab1 Qb6 17. Qc2 Qc7 18. Rfc1 Rfc8 19. Qf5 Rb6 20. Ne5

Rcb8 21. Nc4 Rb5 22. Ba1 Rxb1 23. Rxb1 Rxb1+ 24. Qxb1 Nb6 25. Nxb6 Qxb6 26.

Qxb6 axb6 27. Bxf6 gxf6 {Diagram [#]} 28. Kf1 Kf8 29. a4 Ke7 30. Ke2 Kd6 31.

Kd3 Kd5 32. f3 f5 33. g3 c4+ 34. Kc3 Kc5 35. h3 h5 36. e4 fxe4 37. fxe4 b5 38.

axb5 Kxb5 39. g4 h4 40. g5 Kc5 41. e5 Kd5 42. e6 Kxe6 43. Kxc4 Kf5 44. Kd3 Kf4

$1 45. Ke2 Kg3 46. Ke3 Kh2 47. Kf2 Kxh3 48. Kf1 Kg3 49. Kg1 Kg4 50. Kh2 Kh5 51.

Kg1 Kxg5 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Karthik Selva"]

[Black "David Green"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "A10"]

[WhiteElo "1339"]

[BlackElo "1590"]

[PlyCount "76"]

 

1. c4 g5 2. Nc3 Bg7 3. d4 e6 4. Nf3 Ne7 5. e4 Ng6 6. g4 b6 7. Bg2 Bb7 8. Qe2 d6

9. Bd2 e5 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. O-O-O Nd7 12. Be3 Nf4 13. Bxf4 gxf4 14. Rd2 c6 15.

Rhd1 Bc8 16. Qd3 Qe7 17. Qd6 Qxd6 18. Rxd6 Nb8 19. Nh4 Bd7 20. Nf5 Bf8 21. R6d2

a5 22. Nd6+ Bxd6 23. Rxd6 Ke7 24. Na4 Ra6 25. c5 b5 26. Nb6 Ra7 27. Nxd7 Nxd7

28. Rxc6 Nb8 29. Rb6 b4 30. Rd5 Nd7 31. Rbd6 Nxc5 32. Rc6 Nd7 33. Rcd6 Rc7+ 34.

Kb1 Rhc8 35. Rd1 f6 36. Ra6 Rc2 37. Ra7 R8c7 38. Rxc7 Rxc7 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Brian Wall"]

[Black "Daniel Herman"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E33"]

[WhiteElo "2279"]

[BlackElo "2070"]

[PlyCount "53"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 Qe7 8.

b3 O-O 9. Bb2 Re8 10. g3 e5 11. d5 Nb8 12. Bg2 b5 13. O-O bxc4 14. Qxc4 Bb7 15.

Rfd1 Nbd7 16. e4 Nc5 17. Ne1 Rab8 18. Qc2 Nxb3 19. Qxb3 Bxd5 20. Qc2 Bxe4 21.

Bxe4 Nxe4 22. Qxe4 Rxb2 23. Nd3 Rb6 24. Nb4 Qd7 25. Rac1 Rb5 26. Nd5 c6 27.

Rxc6 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Neil Bhavikatti"]

[Black "Chris Peterson"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "B22"]

[WhiteElo "1659"]

[BlackElo "2261"]

[PlyCount "100"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 4. d4 Qxd5 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. dxc5 e6 7. Qxd5 Nxd5 8.

Ne5 Bh5 9. Bb5+ Ke7 10. c6 bxc6 11. Nxc6+ Nxc6 12. Bxc6 Rd8 13. Bxd5 Rxd5 14.

O-O f6 15. Be3 a6 16. Nd2 Kf7 17. Ne4 Be7 18. Ng3 Bg6 19. Rfd1 Bd3 20. Rd2 Rhd8

21. Rad1 g5 22. Bd4 Bg6 23. Be3 Bd3 24. Bd4 Bg6 25. Be3 Rxd2 26. Rxd2 Rc8 27.

Ne2 e5 28. f3 Ke6 29. g4 h5 30. Ng3 hxg4 31. fxg4 Rc4 32. h3 Rc8 33. Kg2 Rb8

34. Kf3 Bb1 35. a3 Bg6 36. Ba7 Rh8 37. Rh2 Rd8 38. Be3 Rd1 39. Rd2 Rb1 40. Bb6

Be8 41. Nf5 Bc6+ 42. Kg3 Bf8 43. Bc7 Bc5 44. Bd6 Ba7 45. Bc7 Be4 46. Rd6+ Kf7

47. Rd7+ Kg8 48. Rd8+ Kf7 49. Rd7+ Kg8 50. Rd8+ Kf7 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Earle Wikle"]

[Black "Jeff Baffo"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A22"]

[WhiteElo "2021"]

[BlackElo "1879"]

[PlyCount "49"]

 

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Nc3 Nb6 6. e3 Be7 7. Nge2 O-O 8.

O-O c6 9. f4 exf4 10. Nxf4 Na6 11. a3 Nc5 12. Qc2 g6 13. b4 Ne6 14. Ne4 Nxf4

15. Rxf4 Nd5 16. Rf2 Rb8 17. Bb2 f5 18. Nc5 b6 19. Nd3 Bb7 20. Rc1 Rc8 21. Qb3

Bf6 22. Ne5 Kg7 23. e4 fxe4 24. Rcf1 Qe7 25. Ng4 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Justin Alter"]

[Black "Alex Freeman"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B12"]

[WhiteElo "2019"]

[BlackElo "1848"]

[PlyCount "61"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Be2 c5 6. c3 Nc6 7. O-O cxd4 8. cxd4

Qb6 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 Be7 11. Nc3 a6 12. a3 Nh6 13. Bxh6 gxh6 14. b4 Na7 15.

Rfb1 Rc8 16. b5 Nxb5 17. Nxb5 axb5 18. Rxb5 Qc6 19. h3 Rc7 20. a4 O-O 21. Rab1

Ra8 22. a5 Ra7 23. Qe3 Bf8 24. Nh2 Qc3 25. Qf4 Qd3 26. R5b3 Qc2 27. Rg3+ Bg7 {

Diagram [#]} 28. Qf6 Qxb1+ 29. Nf1 Qg6 30. Rxg6 hxg6 31. Qd8+ 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "David Logan"]

[Black "Robert Carlson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B19"]

[WhiteElo "1750"]

[BlackElo "1631"]

[PlyCount "101"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nf3 Nd7 8. h5

Bh7 9. Bd3 Ngf6 10. Bxh7 Nxh7 11. Qd3 e6 12. Bd2 Be7 13. O-O-O Ng5 14. Ne4 Nxe4

15. Qxe4 Nf6 16. Qe2 Qd5 17. c4 Qe4 18. Rde1 Qxe2 19. Rxe2 O-O 20. Ne5 Rfd8 21.

Be3 Nd7 22. g4 Nxe5 23. dxe5 b6 24. Rd1 Rxd1+ 25. Kxd1 Rd8+ 26. Rd2 Rxd2+ 27.

Kxd2 Kf8 28. Kd3 Ke8 29. Ke4 Kd7 30. f4 f6 31. Bd4 fxe5 32. Bxe5 Bf8 33. a4 a6

34. Bd4 b5 35. axb5 axb5 36. cxb5 cxb5 37. g5 Kd6 38. g6 Kd7 39. f5 exf5+ 40.

Kxf5 Kd6 41. Bc3 Kd5 42. Bd2 b4 43. b3 Bc5 $2 44. Bxh6 Bd4 45. Bd2 Kc5 46. h6

gxh6 47. Bxh6 Kd6 48. Bg5 Bg7 49. Bf6 Bxf6 50. Kxf6 Kd5 51. g7 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Aidan Marco"]

[Black "Josh Williams"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B18"]

[WhiteElo "1715"]

[BlackElo "1510"]

[PlyCount "31"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Nf3 Nf6 7. Bd3 Bxd3 8.

Qxd3 e6 9. Bf4 Be7 10. O-O-O O-O 11. h4 h6 {Diagram [#]} 12. Ng5 $1 Nbd7 13.

Nh5 $1 hxg5 14. Nxf6+ gxf6 15. hxg5 f5 16. Qh3 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Colo Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Mukund Gurumurthi"]

[Black "Vibi Varghese"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E12"]

[WhiteElo "1446"]

[BlackElo "1596"]

[PlyCount "49"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. a3 Ba6 5. e3 c5 6. Nc3 d5 7. Ne5 Bb7 8. cxd5

exd5 9. Bb5+ Nbd7 10. Qf3 Qe7 11. Nxd7 Nxd7 12. Nxd5 Qd6 13. Nf6+ Qxf6 14.

Bxd7+ Ke7 15. Qxb7 Rd8 16. Bb5+ Ke6 17. Qc6+ Ke7 18. Qb7+ Ke6 19. Bc4+ Kf5 20.

Qf3+ Kg6 21. Bd3+ Kg5 22. Qf4+ Kh5 23. g4+ Kh4 24. Qg3+ Kg5 25. f4+ 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Rudy Tia"]

[Black "Brian Wall"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A29"]

[WhiteElo "2072"]

[BlackElo "2279"]

[PlyCount "63"]

 

1. c4 e5 2. g3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg2 Bc5 5. Nf3 d6 6. O-O a6 7. d3 h6 8. a3 O-O

9. b4 Bb6 10. Bb2 Bg4 11. h3 Be6 12. Rc1 Qd7 13. Kh2 Nh7 14. Nd5 Ba7 15. d4 f6

16. e3 Nd8 17. e4 g5 18. Ne3 Qe7 19. c5 dxc5 20. dxe5 cxb4 21. exf6 Nxf6 22. e5

Ne8 23. axb4 Bxe3 24. fxe3 Qxb4 25. Bc3 Qe7 26. Nd4 c6 27. Qh5 Rf7 28. Be4 c5

29. Nxe6 Qxe6 30. Bg6 b5 31. Qxh6 Rg7 {Diagram [#]} 32. Bh7+ 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Rhett Langseth"]

[Black "Earle Wikle"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D02"]

[WhiteElo "2071"]

[BlackElo "2021"]

[PlyCount "116"]

 

1. Nf3 d5 2. c3 Nf6 3. d4 e6 4. Bf4 c5 5. e3 Nc6 6. Ne5 Qb6 7. Qb3 Be7 8. h3

O-O 9. Nd2 Nxe5 10. Bxe5 Nd7 11. Bh2 Re8 12. Nf3 cxd4 13. Nxd4 Qxb3 14. axb3

Bd8 15. Nb5 Bb6 16. Bc7 Rf8 17. Bxb6 Nxb6 18. Nc7 Rb8 19. Rxa7 Bd7 20. Kd2 Nc8

21. Ra1 Nd6 22. c4 Rfc8 23. Nb5 Bxb5 24. cxb5 Ne4+ 25. Ke1 Rc2 26. Bd3 Rxb2 27.

Rb1 Nxf2 $1 28. Rxb2 Nxd3+ 29. Kd2 Nxb2 30. Kc3 Rc8+ 31. Kxb2 Rc5 32. b4 Rxb5

33. Kb3 Rb6 34. Ka4 Ra6+ 35. Kb5 Kf8 36. Rc1 Ke7 37. Rc7+ Kf6 38. Rxb7 Ra3 39.

Kc5 Rxe3 40. b5 Rg3 41. b6 Rxg2 42. Rd7 g5 43. b7 Rb2 44. Kc6 h5 45. Rd8 Kf5

46. b8=Q Rxb8 47. Rxb8 {Diagram [#]} d4 48. Kc5 e5 49. Kc4 Kf4 50. Rh8 h4 51.

Rh7 Kg3 52. Rxf7 Kxh3 53. Rf5 g4 54. Rxe5 g3 55. Kxd4 g2 56. Rg5 Kh2 57. Ke4

g1=Q 58. Rh5 Qg4+ 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Sullivan McConnell"]

[Black "Justin Alter"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C01"]

[WhiteElo "1891"]

[BlackElo "2019"]

[PlyCount "98"]

 

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bd3 Bg4 6. h3 Bh5 7. Be3 Bd6 8.

Nc3 c6 9. a3 Qc7 10. Qe2 Bxf3 11. gxf3 Qe7 12. Rg1 g6 13. O-O-O Nbd7 14. Kd2

O-O-O 15. Rde1 Rde8 16. Qd1 Qd8 17. b4 Qc7 18. Qb1 b6 19. Qb3 Qb7 20. Rb1 Nf8

21. Bg5 N8d7 22. Qa4 Qc7 23. Ne2 Nh5 24. b5 c5 25. dxc5 Nxc5 26. Qd4 Ne6 27.

Qxd5 Nxg5 28. Qa8+ Kd7 29. Qc6+ Qxc6 30. bxc6+ Kc7 31. Rxg5 Bf4+ 32. Nxf4 Nxf4

33. Rg3 Nxd3 34. cxd3 Kxc6 35. Rg4 Rd8 36. Rc1+ Kb7 37. Re4 Rd7 38. Rc3 h5 39.

f4 Rc8 40. Rxc8 Kxc8 41. Rb4 Kd8 42. Ke3 Re7+ 43. Re4 Kd7 44. Kd4 Rxe4+ 45.

dxe4 Kd6 46. a4 a6 47. Kc4 Kc6 48. Kb4 b5 49. f3 bxa4 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Chris Peterson"]

[Black "Jesse Williams"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "2261"]

[BlackElo "1556"]

[PlyCount "51"]

 

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Nf6 3. d4 Bg4 4. Be2 Bxe2 5. Nxe2 Qxd5 6. O-O e6 7. Nbc3 Qd7

8. Bg5 Be7 9. Qd3 Nc6 10. a3 O-O-O 11. Rfd1 h6 12. Be3 a6 13. b4 Nd5 14. b5

Nxc3 15. Nxc3 axb5 16. Nxb5 Bf6 17. Rab1 Qe7 18. Qb3 Rd7 19. c4 Kd8 20. d5 exd5

21. cxd5 Ne5 {Diagram [#]} 22. Nxc7 Qd6 23. Rbc1 Rxc7 24. Bb6 Be7 25. Rxc7 Qxc7

26. d6 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Sam Bridle"]

[Black "Sara Herman"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A02"]

[WhiteElo "1800"]

[BlackElo "1894"]

[PlyCount "78"]

 

1. f4 c5 2. b3 b6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 e6 6. O-O Be7 7. d3 d5 8. Bb2 O-O

9. Nbd2 Ng4 10. Qc1 Ne3 11. Rf2 Nxg2 12. Kxg2 Nd7 13. e4 dxe4 14. dxe4 Nf6 15.

Re2 Qc7 16. h3 Nh5 17. e5 g5 18. Ne4 gxf4 19. gxf4 f6 20. Qe3 f5 21. Ng3 Nxg3

22. Kxg3 Rf7 23. Kh2 Qc6 24. Rg1+ Rg7 25. Rxg7+ Kxg7 26. Rg2+ Kf7 27. Kg3 Rg8+

28. Kf2 Bh4+ $1 29. Nxh4 Rxg2+ 30. Nxg2 Qxg2+ 31. Ke1 Qxc2 32. Qe2 Qb1+ 33. Kf2

Bd5 34. Qh5+ Kf8 35. Qh6+ Ke8 36. Qh5+ Kd8 37. Qg5+ Kc8 38. Qg8+ Kb7 39. Qxh7+

Ka6 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Alex Freeman"]

[Black "Griffin McConnell"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C54"]

[WhiteElo "1848"]

[BlackElo "1559"]

[PlyCount "67"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Nc3 O-O 8.

d5 Na5 9. Bd3 c6 10. O-O Bxc3 11. bxc3 cxd5 12. exd5 d6 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bh4 Bg4

15. h3 Bh5 16. g4 Bg6 17. Bxg6 fxg6 18. Qd3 g5 19. Bg3 Qd7 20. Rfe1 Rfe8 21. c4

b6 22. Nd4 Nb7 23. Nf5 Nc5 24. Qd4 Nfe4 25. Bh2 g6 26. Nxh6+ Kh7 27. f3 Kxh6

28. fxe4 Re7 29. Re3 Rae8 30. Rae1 Nb7 31. e5 dxe5 32. Rxe5 Rxe5 33. Rxe5 Rf8

34. Qe3 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Teah Williams"]

[Black "Vedanth Sampath"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "C84"]

[WhiteElo "1663"]

[BlackElo "1375"]

[PlyCount "74"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 d6 5. h3 Be7 6. O-O O-O 7. Nc3 a6 8. Ba4

b5 9. Bb3 Be6 10. Nd5 h6 11. Bd2 Qd7 12. a4 Nd4 13. Nxd4 exd4 14. Re1 Bd8 15.

axb5 Bxh3 16. gxh3 Qxh3 17. Nxf6+ gxf6 18. Bf4 Kh7 19. Bg3 Rg8 20. Qf3 Rg5 21.

Bxf7 Kg7 22. Bd5 h5 23. Bxa8 h4 24. Qh1 Qg4 25. Qg2 hxg3 26. Qxg3 Qf4 $1 27.

Qxg5+ Qxg5+ 28. Kf1 Qxb5 29. Ra2 Qh5 30. Rxa6 Qh3+ 31. Ke2 Qg4+ 32. Kd2 Qf4+

33. Kd1 Qxf2 34. Ra1 f5 35. exf5 Bg5 36. Re2 Qf1+ 37. Re1 Qf2 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Earle Wikle"]

[Black "Rudy Tia"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A90"]

[WhiteElo "2021"]

[BlackElo "2072"]

[PlyCount "84"]

 

1. d4 e6 2. g3 f5 3. Bg2 Nf6 4. c4 c6 5. Nh3 d5 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. Rd1

Nbd7 9. Bf4 Be7 10. Nd2 Nh5 11. Nf3 Nxf4 12. Nxf4 Rf6 13. Rac1 Nb6 14. c5 Nd7

15. Nd3 Rh6 16. b4 g5 17. Qd2 Kg7 18. Nfe5 Bf6 19. f3 Bxe5 20. dxe5 Rg6 21. e4

Qc7 22. exf5 exf5 23. Re1 Nf8 24. e6 Nxe6 25. Re5 Bd7 26. Rxf5 Nf4 27. Nxf4

Bxf5 28. Qd4+ Kf7 29. Nxg6 hxg6 30. Re1 a5 31. b5 Re8 32. Rxe8 Kxe8 33. g4 Bb1

34. Qd1 Bxa2 35. Qe2+ Qe7 36. Qxa2 Qxc5+ 37. Qf2 Qxf2+ 38. Kxf2 a4 39. f4 a3

40. f5 a2 41. fxg6 a1=Q 42. bxc6 bxc6 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Justin Alter"]

[Black "Chris Peterson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B78"]

[WhiteElo "2019"]

[BlackElo "2261"]

[PlyCount "149"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 O-O 8. Bc4

Nc6 9. Qd2 Bd7 10. O-O-O Rc8 11. Bb3 Ne5 12. Kb1 Nc4 13. Bxc4 Rxc4 14. h4 h5

15. Nb3 b5 16. Bh6 Qc7 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Rc1 Rc8 19. Rhe1 b4 20. Nd5 Nxd5 21.

exd5 Bf5 22. Nd4 Qd7 23. Nxf5+ Qxf5 24. Rxe7 a5 25. Qg5 Rxc2 {Diagram [#]} 26.

Rxf7+ Qxf7 27. Rxc2 Rxc2 28. Kxc2 Qc7+ 29. Kd2 a4 30. Qf4 Qc5 31. Kd3 a3 32. b3

Qc3+ 33. Ke2 Qb2+ 34. Qd2 Kf6 35. Kd3 Qb1+ 36. Kc4 Qb2 37. Kd3 Qb1+ 38. Kc4 Qb2

39. Qd4+ Kf7 40. Qa7+ Kf6 41. Qd4+ Kf7 42. Qa7+ Kf6 43. Kxb4 Qxa2 44. Qxa3 Qxg2

45. Qa1+ Kf5 46. Qb1+ Kf6 47. Qe4 Qd2+ 48. Kb5 Qc3 49. b4 Qc7 50. Qc4 Qb7+ 51.

Ka5 Qa8+ 52. Kb5 Qb7+ 53. Ka4 Qa7+ 54. Kb3 g5 55. Qe4 gxh4 56. Qxh4+ Kg6 57.

Qg3+ Kf5 58. Qxd6 Qh7 59. Qe6+ Kg5 60. Qe3+ Kf6 61. Qd4+ Kg5 62. f4+ Kg4 63.

f5+ Kg3 64. Qe5+ Kg4 65. d6 h4 66. Qe4+ Kg3 67. d7 Qg8+ 68. Kc3 Qd8 69. Qe5+

Kg2 70. Qe8 Qc7+ 71. Kb2 Qf4 72. Qe2+ Kg3 73. d8=Q Qxb4+ 74. Kc1 Qc5+ 75. Qc2 {

and White won.} 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Dean Clow"]

[Black "Sara Herman"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A48"]

[WhiteElo "2068"]

[BlackElo "1894"]

[PlyCount "101"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bf4 g6 4. e3 Bg7 5. Bc4 O-O 6. O-O Nbd7 7. a4 Nh5 8. Bg5

h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Nfd2 Ndf6 11. Bg3 Nxg3 12. hxg3 d5 13. Bd3 c5 14. c3 e5 15.

dxe5 Ng4 16. Nf3 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Bxe5 18. f4 Bg7 19. Nd2 c4 20. Bb1 Qb6 21. Qf3

Qxb2 22. Qxd5 Qxc3 23. Nxc4 Bg4 24. Ra3 Qb4 25. fxg5 h5 26. g6 Be6 27. gxf7+

Bxf7 28. Qe4 {Diagram [#]} Bg6 29. Rxf8+ Rxf8 30. Qxg6 Rf6 31. Qe8+ Bf8 32. Qe4

Qe1+ 33. Kh2 Bxa3 34. Nxa3 Rf1 35. Qh7+ Kf8 36. Qh8+ Ke7 37. Qg7+ Kd8 38. Qd4+

Ke7 39. Qe5+ Kf8 40. Qd6+ Kg7 41. Qe5+ Kf8 42. Qb8+ Ke7 43. Qxb7+ Kf8 44. Qb8+

Ke7 45. Qxa7+ Kf8 46. Qc5+ Kg7 47. Qe7+ Rf7 48. Qe5+ Kf8 49. Bd3 h4 50. Qh8+

Ke7 51. Qxh4+ {and White won.} 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Neil Bhavikatti"]

[Black "Paul Anderson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A42"]

[WhiteElo "1659"]

[BlackElo "2041"]

[PlyCount "79"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 g6 3. c4 d6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. Be3 a6 6. Nf3 b5 7. Qb3 Nd7 8. Rd1 Nh6

9. h3 O-O 10. g4 Kh8 11. g5 Ng8 12. h4 f5 13. Be2 fxe4 14. Nxe4 bxc4 15. Qxc4

Rb8 16. Qc2 Qa5+ 17. Nc3 Qf5 18. Qxf5 gxf5 19. h5 h6 20. Nh4 Rd8 21. Nxf5 hxg5

22. h6 Bf6 23. h7 Nf8 24. hxg8=Q+ Kxg8 25. Nh6+ Kg7 26. b3 c5 27. Ne4 Bb7 28.

f3 Bxe4 29. fxe4 cxd4 30. Nf5+ Kg8 31. Bxd4 Bxd4 32. Nxd4 Rb6 33. Rg1 Nh7 34.

Ne6 Rc8 35. Bc4 Kh8 36. Nxg5 Nxg5 37. Rxg5 Rc5 38. Rxc5 dxc5 39. Rd8+ Kg7 40.

Rc8 {and White won.} 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Aidan Marco"]

[Black "Mukund Gurumurthi"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C78"]

[WhiteElo "1715"]

[BlackElo "1446"]

[PlyCount "84"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. Nxe5 Bxf2+ 7. Rxf2 Nxe5

8. Nc3 O-O 9. d4 Neg4 10. Rf3 d5 11. Bg5 dxe4 12. Nxe4 Qd5 13. Nxf6+ Nxf6 14.

Rg3 Ne4 15. Be7 Nxg3 16. Bxf8 Qxd4+ $1 17. Qxd4 Ne2+ 18. Kf2 Nxd4 19. Be7 b5

20. Rd1 Nc6 21. Bb3 Bg4 22. Re1 Re8 23. Bc5 Rxe1 24. Kxe1 Be6 25. Ke2 Bxb3 26.

cxb3 f5 27. Ke3 Kf7 28. Kf4 Ke6 29. Bf8 Kf6 30. h4 Nd4 31. Bb4 Ke6 32. Bc3 Kd5

33. Ke3 f4+ 34. Kf2 Nf5 35. h5 g5 36. Kf3 Nh4+ 37. Kf2 g4 38. g3 Nf5 39. gxf4

Ke4 40. Bf6 Kxf4 41. b4 g3+ 42. Kg2 Kg4 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Jesse Williams"]

[Black "Dean Brown"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A36"]

[WhiteElo "1556"]

[BlackElo "1467"]

[PlyCount "112"]

 

1. c4 c5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. e4 d6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. Nge2 O-O 7. d3 Nc6 8. Bg5

Ng4 9. h3 Nf6 10. Qd2 Qb6 11. Rb1 e6 12. Qf4 Ne5 13. Qd2 a6 14. O-O Ned7 15.

Na4 Qc7 16. Nac3 Rb8 17. b4 b5 18. cxb5 axb5 19. bxc5 b4 20. cxd6 Qxd6 21. Nd1

Ba6 22. Nb2 Ne5 23. d4 Bxe2 24. dxe5 Qxd2 25. Bxd2 Bxf1 26. exf6 Bxg2 27. fxg7

Rfd8 28. Bg5 Bxe4 29. Re1 Rd5 30. Bf6 Bc2 31. f4 Ra8 32. Rc1 Rd2 33. Kf1 Rxa2

34. Ke1 Rh2 35. h4 Rh1+ 36. Kd2 Rxc1 37. Kxc1 b3 38. Kd2 h5 39. Kc3 Ra1 40. Be5

Rg1 41. Nc4 Rxg3+ 42. Kb2 Rg4 43. Nb6 Rxh4 44. Nc8 {Diagram [#]} f6 $1 45. Ne7+

Kxg7 46. Bd6 Kf7 47. Nc6 e5 48. fxe5 fxe5 49. Nxe5+ Ke6 50. Bc7 Rh3 51. Nc4 g5

52. Bb6 g4 53. Ne3 Rh2 54. Bc7 Rf2 55. Bg3 Rf3 56. Nxc2 bxc2 0-1

 

[Event "2017 Col Spgs Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Selah Williams"]

[Black "Abraham Richmond"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A05"]

[WhiteElo "1155"]

[BlackElo "1485"]

[PlyCount "59"]

 

1. c4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 e5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. Nf3 d6 6. d3 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. e4

Bg4 9. Be3 a6 10. a3 Nd4 11. Bxd4 cxd4 12. Nd5 Nxd5 13. exd5 {Diagram [#]} Qd7

14. Re1 Bh3 15. Nd2 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 f5 17. Rf1 Bg5 18. Nf3 Bf6 19. Nd2 Bg5 20.

Nf3 Qe7 21. Nxg5 Qxg5 22. f4 Qf6 23. Qf3 Rae8 24. Rae1 exf4 25. Qxf4 g5 26. Qf3

Qg6 27. a4 Rxe1 28. Rxe1 Kf7 29. Re6 g4 30. Qf4 1-0

 


Stone Cold

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 11, 2017 at 3:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Chess Is The Word

Sunday, March 12th, 2017

 

I am back for another season of chess news and games.  Last year, I dropped from my peak  (USCF 2102) and had my first down year in 5 years.  While it is disappointing to have an off year, I am going to pin the blame on the distractions I have to endure while serving as the club President and Tournament Director.

 

As club President, I was unamiously re-elected to another term for 2017.  Of course, I am very grateful for the help I get from my newly elected Vice-President, Peter Barlay.  He has done a great job bringing in new Supporting Members for the club.  In fact, we set a record in 2016 for the most Supporting Members.


It is almost like we have 2 chess club Presidents...


You need Adobe Flash Player to view this content.


 

You can view more chess videos on Colorado Springs Chess News' Youtube channel (http://www.youtube.com/user/cschessnews), which had 121,087 views last year.

 

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the club event on Tuesday night, the March Swiss 90.  It is a month-long tournament with one round per evening.  The time control is G/90+30, which means it is one of the slower time controls.  After the rating fees are paid, most of the entry fees are returned to the players in the form of prizes. 


One of the prizes is a Game Of The Week prize, which typically goes to the player who wins the game chosen for my Game Of The Week column.  This rewards the player for creating a nice tactic that I can use in my newsletter.  However, if I should choose my own game, I certainly don't feel right giving myself the prize.  In that case, I give the prize to the player who lost the game since they contributed to creating the position that contained an interesting tactic.


This week is similar.  Since Peter Barlay is my house player and did not pay an entry fee, I have decided to give the Game Of The Week prize to Alex Mekonnen, his opponent who technically lost the game.


However, Alex could have won.  He could have won in several ways. 


The club couldn't get the heat to turn on in the ballroom, where we usually play.  Alex didn't want to play in the 50 degree freezer.  So, we moved his game into the library, where things were hotter.


Your words like ice fall on the ground,

Breaking the silence without a sound

Oh, familiar strangers with nothing to say

Searching in the darkness

Fading out of sight

Love was here and gone like a thief in the night...Stone Cold

(Blackmore, Glover, Turner)


However, the heat may have had Alex moving too fast.  If Alex had just slowed down in this position, he could have put Peter in the deep freeze.


Black to move

 


 

You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=203801419

 

Stone Cold

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109878

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.03.07"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Barlay, Peter"]

[Black "Mekonnen, Alex"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B21"]

[WhiteElo "1949"]

[BlackElo "1528"]

[PlyCount "126"]

[EventDate "2017.03.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 d6 4. cxd4 e6 5. Nf3

Nf6 6. Bd3 Nbd7 7. O-O Be7 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Bf4 e5 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12.

Bxe5 a6 13. Nd5 Ng4 14. Bc7 Qd7 15. Rc1 Qe6 16. Nb6 Ra7 17. h3 Ne5 18. Bb1 Nd7

19. Nd5 Bd8 20. Nf4 Qf6 21. Bd6 Ra8 22. Bxf8 Nxf8 23. Qd2 Be6 24. Rfd1 h6 25.

Nd5 Qh4 26. Qf4 Qh5 27. Qg3 Qe2 28. Qd3 Qxb2 29. Qc3 Qe2 30. Qd2 Qh5 31. Nf4

Qe5 32. Ne2 Bb6 33. Qd6 Qa5 34. Qd2 Qb5 35. Nd4 Qe8 36. Qb4 Bxd4 37. Rxd4 b5

38. Rcd1 Bc4 39. Qa5 Qe7 40. Qd2 Ne6 41. Rd7 Qf6 42. e5 Qg5 43. Qd6 Be2 44. Re1

Bh5 45. Qc6 Rf8 46. Qc1 Nf4 47. Be4 Nxh3+ 48. Kf1 Nf4 49. Qe3 Ne6 50. Qxg5 Nxg5

51. Bb7 a5 52. Rb1 b4 53. Rd5 Ne4 54. Rb2 Rb8 55. Rb5 Nc3 56. e6 Nxb5 57. e7 f6

58. Bc6 Nc3 59. Rd2 Kf7 60. Rd8 Kxe7 61. Rxb8 Nxa2 62. Rb5 a4 63. Rxh5 b3 1-0

 

This Week In Chess

 

On March 7th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).  10 players joined.

 

Here are the results:

 

Standings: March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Peter Barlay 1949 W7 1.0

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 1923 W8 1.0

3 Mark McGough 1848 W9 1.0

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1802 W10 1.0

5 Calvin P Dejong 1754 W6 1.0

6 Paul D Anderson 2041 L5 0.0

7 Alemayeh Mekonnen 1528 L1 0.0

8 Dean W Brown 1467 L2 0.0

9 Michael Smith II 1332 L3 0.0

10 Scott Ch Williams 1231 L4 0.0


Colorado Springs Open Standings

By Buck Buchanan


5.0 Rudy Tia

4.5 Justin Alter

4.0 Brian Wall

4.0 Dean Clow

3.5 Daniel Herman

3.5 Duwayne Langseth

3.5 Earle Wikle

3.5 Sullivan McConnell

3.5 Alexander Freeman

3.5 Neil Bhavikatti

3.0 Sara Herman

3.0 Rhett Langseth

3.0 Brian Rountree

3.0 Teah Williams

3.0 Robert Carlson

3.0 Dean Brown

3.0 Christofer Peterson

3.0 Jeffrey Baffo

3.0 Joshua Williams

3.0 David Green

3.0 Mukund Gurumurthi

2.5 Sam Bridle

2.5 Kevin Gene Lucas

2.5 David Hufnagel

2.5 Vibi Varghese

2.5 Griffin McConnell

2.0 Aidan Marco

2.0 David Logan

2.0 Alemayeh Mekonnen

2.0 Jesse Williams

2.0 Vedanth Sampath

2.0 Selah Williams

2.0 Paul Anderson

2.0 Jason Lee

2.0 Scott Williams

2.0 Shirley Herman

2.0 Kathy Schneider

1.5 Karthik B Selva

1.5 Ron Rossi

1.5 Clinton Eads

1.5 Daniel Rupp

1.0 Gary Bagstad

1.0 Abraham Richmond

1.0 Christophe Motley

1.0 Neyalla Gallagher

0.5 William Wolf

0.5 Michael Smith

0.0 Joshua Faulconer

Game Of The Year XIII

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 7, 2016 at 3:05 AM Comments comments (0)

End Of The Season

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

 

Well, another chess season has come to a close for me.  It is time for me to move on to managing the website for my other hobby (http://spamfootball.webs.com/), but I will return after the football season ends.  Before I go, I wanted to clean up some loose ends.

 

Of course, you can still send in news items or articles during the off-season, and I will email them along to the subscribers.  Any games I receive will be stored at the Colorado Springs Chess News’ Yahoo! group (http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/cs_chess/).  You can also join the group to keep receiving chess games all year round.

 

So, before I finish typing my chess thoughts for another year, I want to thank all the people who sent in games and articles, all the people who took the time to tell me something nice about the newsletter, and all the people who take the time to read this.

 

Game Of The Year

 

Usually at this time, I look over the past year's statistics to see if it was a good or bad year for me.  Looking over the statistics helps me get past the bad feelings that linger from my losses.  They bring me back into balance and force me to look at what I did right and what I did wrong.  While 2015 sets some records, this year looks to be an off year:

 

  • 2053 peak USCF rating (record: 2015 - 2102)
  • 2055 peak BLITZ rating (record: 2015 - 2055)
  • 2054 peak CLUB rating (record: 2013 - 2127)
  • 71.43% USCF winning percentage (record: 2012 - 79.31%)
  • 74.14% CLUB winning percentage (record: 2013 - 87.86%)
  • 18 projected prizes won (record: 2014 - 20)
  • 23 projected USCF-rated wins (record: 2013 - 75.5)
  • 1 upset (record: 2001 - 6)

 

However, I found a new report on the USCF website that can quickly give you an idea of how the year went.  The nice thing is that I still have to the end of the year to make this a positive year.


Year, Peak Rating, Gain

  1. 1998 1680 +
  2. 1999 1580 -
  3. 2000 1567 -
  4. 2001 1695 +
  5. 2002 1757 +
  6. 2003 1772 +
  7. 2004 1805 +
  8. 2005 1864 +
  9. 2006 1882 +
  10. 2007 1897 +
  11. 2008 1962 +
  12. 2009 2003 +
  13. 2010 1977 -
  14. 2011 2000 +
  15. 2012 2043 +
  16. 2013 2058 +
  17. 2014 2098 +
  18. 2015 2102 +
  19. 2016 2053 ?

 

Total: 15 positive years and 3 negative years

 

So, as far as my favorite game of the year goes, the obvious choice would be the one upset I had this year.  The problem is that I have already published that game when I was trying to help promote the chess movie:  The Dark Horse (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/43857512-the-dark-horse).  It was supposed to be re-released in some select cities this year. 


However, the movie was like my chess upsets; never to be seen again.

 

Without any other good wins from which to choose, I decided it was time to pick a draw for the Game Of The Year.  This will be the first time I have chosen one of my draws for the game of the year.  However, it was not without excitement.


I was playing Alex Bozhenov on board one at the Colorado Springs Chess Club's monthly event.  I thought he played well and felt that I had messed up the ending when he caught me by surprise getting a Passed Pawn on move 42.  I tried not to panic and use my time advantage to solve the problem he had given me.


I thought I had figured out a way to salvage a draw.  He was very low in time and had a naked King.  So, I am sure he was happy with a draw.  I, however, was not convinced I had given up the victory, but I was very nervous that I would push for a win and blunder the draw.  I have done this before.  Typically, this happens when I use up my time advantage and fall below my opponent on the clock.


I decided to keep pressing for the win despite falling behind in time and allowing his Pawn to get one square away from Promotion because I had a 30 second increment.  My clock would get under 1 minute, but I would make a move and jump back over a minute.  It was giving me a false sense of security.  I thought I could go on like this forever.


I gained a 2 Pawn Advantage and thought I had to have a win somehow.  But I tried to remind myself not to give up the draw.  I found myself in the position below with seconds clicking off the clock.


I was tortured by being up 2 Pawns.  I had always thought somebody said, "Two Paws are winning."  How could I offer a draw?


Finally, I decided this position was above my pay grade.  I was going to have to leave it in the hands of the long-drawn-out-endgame masters, DuWayne Langseth and LM Brian Wall.


I wasn't going to figure this out with just 30 seconds to think or by making random moves.  So, I tried to remember the rules about making a draw offer.  In my case, it was a little more difficult because I have to take off  my headphones and my opponent doesn't speak English.


After offering the draw, I almost forgot to hit my clock.  When I finally pressed the button, I realized I was at 1 second.

 

White to move


 

See diagram and answer here: http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202617453

 

Game Of The Year XIII

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=108045

 

[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.08.09"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "A45"]

[WhiteElo "2036"]

[BlackElo "1955"]

[PlyCount "120"]

[EventDate "2016.08.02"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 Ne4 3. Bf4 c6 4. c3 d5 5. Nd2

Nxd2 6. Qxd2 Bf5 7. Nf3 h6 8. e3 e6 9. Be2 Be7 10. O-O Nd7 11. Rfc1 O-O 12. c4

Nf6 13. h3 Bd6 14. Bxd6 Qxd6 15. b4 dxc4 16. Bxc4 Rad8 17. Qb2 Nd5 18. a3 a6

19. Ne5 f6 20. Nd3 b6 21. Ne1 Kh8 22. Nf3 b5 23. Bxd5 cxd5 24. Rc5 Bd3 25. Qc3

Bc4 26. Nh4 Rf7 27. Nf3 Re8 28. a4 bxa4 29. Rxa4 e5 30. Raa5 e4 31. Nd2 Bb5 32.

Nb1 Rb7 33. Na3 Reb8 34. Nxb5 Rxb5 35. Raxb5 Rxb5 36. Rxb5 axb5 37. Qc5 Qd7 38.

Kh2 Kh7 39. f3 f5 40. Kg3 g5 41. Qb6 f4+ 42. exf4 e3 43. fxg5 hxg5 44. Qf6 Qc7+

45. f4 gxf4+ 46. Kf3 Qc2 47. Qf7+ Kh8 48. Qh5+ Kg7 49. Qe5+ Kh7 50. Qh5+ Kg7

51. Qg4+ Kh7 52. Kxf4 e2 53. Qh5+ Kg8 54. Qxd5+ Kh7 55. Qh5+ Kg8 56. Qe8+ Kh7

57. Qf7+ Kh6 58. Qf6+ Kh7 59. Qe7+ Kg8 60. Qe6+ Kh7 1/2-1/2

 

This Week In Chess

 

On September 6th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club hosted the September Swiss 90 (4SS, G/90+30, $10 entry). 12 players joined the event.

 

Standings. September

# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 12626102 2276 W7 1.0

2 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2036 W8 1.0

3 Mitchell Anderson 12788878 1991 W9 1.0

4 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1955 W10 1.0

5 Peter Barlay 14700831 1890 W11 1.0

6 Mark McGough 11366481 1809 W12 1.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1801 L1 0.0

8 Dean W Brown 10224098 1400 L2 0.0

9 Daniel J Rupp 15768473 921 L3 0.0

10 Douglas N Clark 15941617 379 L4 0.0

11 Ken Ahlstrom unr. L5 0.0

12 Rob Lorenzen 16065265 unr. L6 0.0

When It Rains, It Pours

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 22, 2016 at 3:25 AM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night event:  August Swiss 90.  It was the 3rd round, and I was facing Mark McGough as Black on board one.  Mark and I have played so much chess together since 2010 that he has become the player I have beaten the most in rated chess (see http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/43998232-whipping-boy).


However, I have run out of good ideas to throw him off his game.  Now, all I am left with is my bad ideas.  This time I tried the Owens Defence.  I have never played it before and had no idea what I was doing.  I survived the opening, but then I got stuck and dropped a Pawn.


I gave up hopes of winning and focused on trying to draw.  Soon, it seemed like I had secured the draw, and he was not going to risk pushing for a win.  I decided to try one more idea that I thought might give him a chance to make a mistake.


Well, when it rains, it pours; and I am wrong as rain.


I was not done with my bad ideas.  Instead of giving Mark a chance for a mistake, I just gave myself a chance for more mistakes.  Just when I thought I might have a shot at a win, I realized I had missed a move for his King.

 

White to move

 

See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202486716

 

When It Rains, It Pours

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107907

 

[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.08.16"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "McGough, Mark"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B00"]

[WhiteElo "1809"]

[BlackElo "2036"]

[PlyCount "161"]

[EventDate "2016.08.02"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3 Nc6 4. c3 e5 5. d5 Nb8

6. Be3 Nf6 7. Nd2 Be7 8. Nh3 O-O 9. O-O d6 10. f4 exf4 11. Nxf4 Nbd7 12. Nh5

Nxh5 13. Qxh5 Ne5 14. Be2 Bc8 15. h3 Bf6 16. Nf3 g6 17. Qh6 Bg7 18. Qg5 f6 19.

Qg3 Nxf3+ 20. Rxf3 Qe7 21. Bd3 Bd7 22. Raf1 Rae8 23. Qh4 Rf7 24. Bd4 Ref8 25.

Kh1 Bc8 26. R3f2 a6 27. a4 a5 28. Rf3 Bd7 29. b3 Bc8 30. R3f2 Bb7 31. Rf3 f5

32. Qxe7 Rxe7 33. Bxg7 Kxg7 34. exf5 Ref7 35. c4 Bc8 36. g4 gxf5 37. Bxf5 Bxf5

38. gxf5 Rf6 39. Kg2 Re8 40. Kg3 Re5 41. Kg4 Re4+ 42. Rf4 Re3 43. R1f3 Re1 44.

Rg3 Kf7 45. Kg5 Re5 46. Rgf3 Re8 47. Rg4 Re5 48. Rgf4 h6+ 49. Kh4 Ke7 50. Kh5

Kd7 51. h4 c6 52. dxc6+ Kxc6 53. Kg4 Kc5 54. Rd3 Kc6 55. Rfd4 Kc7 56. Rd5 Re4+

57. Kh5 Rf4 58. Rg3 Kc6 59. Rg6 R6xf5+ 60. Rxf5 Rxf5+ 61. Kxh6 Rf3 62. h5 Rxb3

63. Kg7 Re3 64. Rg5 Kd7 65. h6 Re7+ 66. Kf6 Re6+ 67. Kg7 Re7+ 68. Kg6 Re6+ 69.

Kh5 Re1 70. h7 Kc6 71. Kg6 Re8 72. Kf7 Kd7 73. Rh5 Re7+ 74. Kf6 Re6+ 75. Kf5

Re5+ 76. Kg4 Re8 77. h8=Q Rxh8 78. Rxh8 Kc6 79. Rh5 d5 80. Rxd5 b5 81. Rxb5 1-0

 

This Week In Chess

 

On August 16th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF event (6SS, G/90+30). 12 players joined.

 

Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 11366481 1809 W10 W5 W4 3.0

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1929 W12 D4 W7 2.5

3 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1698 D5 W11 H--- 2.0

4 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2036 W9 D2 L1 1.5

5 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1829 D3 L1 W9 1.5

6 Peter Barlay 14700831 1873 H--- U--- W11 1.5

7 Imre Barlay 11024190 1911 H--- H--- L2 1.0

8 Dean W Brown 10224098 1435 U--- U--- W10 1.0

9 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1775 L4 D12 L5 0.5

10 Douglas N Clark 15941617 379 L1 H--- L8 0.5

11 Derek Eskeldson 16087814 unr. H--- L3 L6 0.5

12 Anthea Jan Carson 12614322 1739 L2 D9 U--- 0.5

Bridle Shower

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 16, 2016 at 6:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from 2015.  It was my first year as TD (tournament director), and the first year we had moved the G/90+30 time control to Tuesday nights.  It was not easy adjusting to both of those changes.


I used to play G/90;d/5, which is 90 minutes for your entire game plus a 5 second delay for each move.  I would try to move quickly in the opening and save at least 10 minutes for the endgame.  Also, once you or your opponent got under 5 minutes on the clock, you could stop score keeping.  Therefore, there was a point where you could just focus on making good moves in the endgame.


So, my panic mode kicked in at 5 minutes.  It was like the 2 minute warning in football.


Now, with the 30 second increment, you have to keep score the entire game, and you can gain time on your clock.  The 5 minute panic mode was obsolete.  You could get under 5 minutes on move 10, gain more time by moving fast, go back under 5 minutes on move 20, gain more time by moving fast, and never go under 5 minutes again.


However, my old habit of panicking at 5 minutes was not going to die out quickly.  But now, I could not calm myself by setting aside the score sheet and putting down the pen.  I could not get into the 2 minute offense.


I was like a baseball pitcher who had great stuff for 8 innings but then lost his stuff.  If I had been the coach, I would have given myself an early shower in this game and put in the relief endgamer.


The first sign that I was losing my stuff was in this position.  See if you can hit the strike zone.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202442077


Bridle Shower

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107782

 

[Event "December Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2015.12.29"]

[Round "5.2"]

[White "Bridle, Sam"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A01"]

[WhiteElo "1854"]

[BlackElo "2090"]

[PlyCount "113"]

[EventDate "2015.12.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. b3 d5 2. Bb2 Nf6 3. e3 Bf5 4. Be2 e6 5. g4 Be4

6. f3 Nxg4 7. h4 Be7 8. Nh3 Bxh4+ 9. Kf1 Qd6 10. f4 Nxe3+ 11. dxe3 Bxh1 12. Nc3

Nc6 13. Nf2 Bxf2 14. Kxf2 Be4 15. Nxe4 dxe4 16. Qh1 O-O-O 17. Bxg7 Rhg8 18. Bf6

Rdf8 19. Rd1 Qc5 20. Qxe4 Rg6 21. Bg5 Rfg8 22. Bf3 Rxg5 23. fxg5 Qxg5 24. Qxh7

Qg3+ 25. Ke2 Ne5 26. Qe4 Nxf3 27. Qxf3 Qh2+ 28. Kd3 Rd8+ 29. Kc3 Qe5+ 30. Kb4

Rxd1 31. Qxd1 Qxe3 32. Qh5 Qf4+ 33. Ka3 b6 34. Qh8+ Kb7 35. Qh1+ c6 36. Qd1 a5

37. Qd7+ Qc7 38. Qe8 e5 39. Kb2 f5 40. Kc3 Qg7 41. Kd2 f4 42. a4 Kc7 43. Ke2

Qg2+ 44. Ke1 Qd5 45. Qe7+ Kc8 46. Qe8+ Kb7 47. Qe7+ Ka6 48. Qf8 b5 49. axb5+

Qxb5 50. Qa8+ Kb6 51. Qb8+ Kc5 52. Qxe5+ Kb4 53. Qxf4+ Kc3 54. Qd2+ Kb2 55. c4+

Kxb3 56. cxb5 cxb5 57. Qxa5 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On August 9th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF event (6SS, G/90+30). 9 players joined.


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 11366481 1809 W8 W5 2.0

2 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2036 W6 D3 1.5

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1929 W7 D2 1.5

4 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1698 D5 W9 1.5

5 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1829 D4 L1 0.5

6 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1775 L2 D7 0.5

7 Anthea Jan Carson 12614322 1739 L3 D6 0.5

8 Douglas N Clark 15941617 379 L1 H--- 0.5

9 Derek Eskeldson 16087814 unr. H--- L4 0.5


Pikes Peak Open Standings

By Buck Buchanan


Standings. 2016 Pikes Peak Open


1 Dean Clow 4.5

2 Josh Bloomer 4.5

3 Gunnar Andersen 4.0

4 Ted Doykos 4.0

5 Aleksand Bozhenov 4.0

6 Daniel Herman 3.5

7 Ron Farrar 3.5

8 Brad Lundstrom 3.5

9 Earle Wikle 3.5

10 Isaac Martinez 3.5

11 Sheena Zeng 3.5

12 Rhett Langseth 3.0

13 Joshua Williams 3.0

14 Sara Herman 3.0

15 Aidan Marco 3.0

16 Sulliva McConnell 3.0

17 Neil Bhavikatti 3.0

18 Alex Cacas 3.0

19 Brian Rountree 3.0

20 Joseph Pahk 3.0

21 Sami Al-Adsani 2.5

22 Ronald Rossi 2.5

23 Jeffrey Baffo 2.5

24 Alexander Freeman 2.5

25 Anthea Carson 2.5

26 Griffin McConnell 2.5

27 Warren Williamson 2.5

28 David Green 2.5

29 Robert Carlson 2.5

30 Scott Williams 2.5

31 Daoud Zupa 2.0

32 Alexander Marsh 2.0

33 Calvin Dejong 2.0

34 David Logan 2.0

35 Gary Bagstad 2.0

36 Doyle Lobaugh 2.0

37 Jesse Williams 2.0

38 Gerald Mena 2.0

39 William Wolf 1.5

40 Teah Williams 1.5

41 Eugin Pahk 1.5

42 Felix Yu 1.5

43 Mark Krowczyk 1.0

44 Selah Williams 1.0

45 Lawrence Pelo 1.0

46 Betty Baffo 1.0

47 Shirley Herman 1.0

48 Yuna Pahk 1.0

49 Steven Butcher 0.5

50 Jack Woehr 0.5

51 Tara Martinez 0.5

52 Joseph Aragon 0.5

 

Russian Gold

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 9, 2016 at 6:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Tuesday night event at the Colorado Springs Chess Club:  August Swiss 90.  We had 8 players join the tournament.  So, as TD (tournament director), I had 4 games to choose from for the Game Of The Week. 


Of course, one of the games was mine.  While Alex Freeman played a great game, I ended up winning after dropping a Pawn in the middle game.  So, I didn't want to publish another win of mine, as I have had plenty of my victories already published this year.  In fact, I am 2 games behind on my goal of published losses of mine.  Maybe next week I will get one of those out of the way.


I decided I liked the game from Alex Bozhenov the best.  He is a Russian that visited Colorado Springs last year when his daughter got married and became an American citizen. 


Alex Bozhenoz receives a shirt.


The Russians have been getting a lot of negative press about doping and cheating recently.  I thought that they could use some good press.  While the International Olympic Committee left it up to me to allow Alex to play in Tuesday's event, I have no reason to believe that he has been using performance enhancing drugs and allowed him to compete.


After my game with Alex Freeman, he would be the one I would most suspect.


Anyway, the toughest part of picking the Game Of The Week is reading the score sheets.  As I was entering Alex's game, I put in the wrong fourth move.  My instinct was different than what Alex played.  Soon I realized my choice couldn't work with the rest of the moves.  So, I had to go back and fix it.  However, I was curious if my choice was better.


So, I let the computer run on this golden position.  What is your instinct?


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202388004


Russian Gold

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107707

 

[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.08.02"]

[Round "1.2"]

[White "Bozhenov, Alex"]

[Black "Carson, Anthea"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C29"]

[WhiteElo "1929"]

[BlackElo "1739"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2016.08.02"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. f4 Bb4 4. fxe5 Bxc3 5.

bxc3 Nxe4 6. Nf3 Ng5 7. d4 Nxf3+ 8. Qxf3 O-O 9. Bc4

Nc6 10. O-O Qe7 11. Qg3 Kh8 12. Bg5 Qe8 13. Rf6 Ne7 14. Raf1 d5 15. exd6 Nf5

16. R6xf5 Bxf5 17. Rxf5 cxd6 18. h3 Rc8 19. Bd3 f6 20. Bd2 g6 21. Rd5 Rd8 22.

Rxd6 Rxd6 23. Qxd6 Qd8 24. Qxd8 Rxd8 25. a4 a6 26. Be4 Rd7 27. Kf2 Kg7 28. Ke3

f5 29. Bf3 Kf6 30. c4 g5 31. c5 f4+ 32. Kd3 h6 33. c4 Rc7 34. Ba5 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On August 2nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF event (6SS, G/90+30). 8 players joined.


Standings. August Swiss 90

# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2036 W6 1.0

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1929 W7 1.0

3 Mark McGough 11366481 1809 W8 1.0

4 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1829 D5 0.5

5 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1698 D4 0.5

6 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1775 L1 0.0

7 Anthea Jan Carson 12614322 1739 L2 0.0

8 Douglas N Clark 15941617 379 L3 0.0

Missed Mates

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 1, 2016 at 7:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my extra games database.  Every so often, I will play a game I like enough to want to look at later.  This one was a Quick game and not something I usually record.  However, it tied my record for largest Mate Announcement.  So, I had to check to see if it was a correct announcement.


The Mate Announcement came about partly because I knew my opponent and partly because he had build a big time advantage and then left the table.


My opponent was Atharva Vispute, one of the top scholastic players in Colorado.  He is currently tied for #85 on the list of Top Age 13 chess players in the US. 


He has a habit of playing very fast when he falls behind in position.  Therefore, he had built a large lead in time.  However, this strategy was probably a good idea because he kept me moving quickly and not getting any time to think on his clock.  He caught me missing a mate in 4 on move 34 (34...Bxf3+ 35. Kh3 Bh1+ 36. f3 Rxf3+ 37. Kh4 Bh6+).


Finally, he left the board, and I made a quick move, trying to set up a Discovery and win a Rook.  However, as I had to wait for him to return, I realized I had mate.  I calculated it out and decided to make the announcement.  What would you announce?


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202334303


Missed Mates

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107646

 

[Event "Denny's Quick May"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.05.06"]

[Round "2.1"]

[White "Vispute, Atharva"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B13"]

[WhiteElo "1661"]

[BlackElo "1994"]

[PlyCount "86"]

[EventDate "2016.05.06"]

[TimeControl "1440"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. c4

e6 6. Be2 Be7 7. Nc3 O-O 8. O-O Nc6 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. Be3 a6 11. a3 b5 12. Bd3

Bb7 13. Bc2 Bf6 14. Ne4 Be7 15. Neg5 Nxe3 16. Qd3 Nf5 17. Nxh7 Ncxd4 18. Nxf8

Nxf3+ 19. gxf3 Qxd3 20. Bxd3 Kxf8 21. Bxf5 exf5 22. Kg2 Rd8 23. Rac1 Bf6 24.

Rc7 Bd5 25. Ra7 Rd6 26. Rc1 g6 27. Rc2 Kg7 28. Kg3 Bb3 29. Rc8 Bxb2 30. Rac7

Be5+ 31. Kg2 Be6 32. Ra8 Rd3 33. Rca7 Bd5 34. Re8 Bd4 35. Rxa6 Rxf3 36. Kg1

Rxf2 37. h4 Rf4+ 38. Kh2 Rxh4+ 39. Kg3 Rg4+ 40. Kh3 Bf2 41. Rg8+ Kxg8 42. Rxg6+

fxg6 43. a4 Rh4# 0-1

 

This Week In Chess


On July 26th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a Quick event (6SS, G/24;d/5). 8 players joined.


Standings. July Quick


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 11366481 1714 W7 L5 W6 D3 W2 W4 4.5 $21.00 1st

2 Jeffrey R Fox 12641996 1851 W6 L4 W3 W5 L1 W8 4.0 $14.00 2nd

3 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1634 L4 W6 L2 D1 W5 W7 3.5

4 Paul D Anderson 12728345 1984 W3 W2 D5 U--- W6 L1 3.5

5 Earle P Wikle 12126030 1896 H--- W1 D4 L2 L3 W6 3.0

6 Daniel J Rupp 15768473 960 L2 L3 L1 W7 L4 L5 1.0

7 Douglas N Clark 15941617 567 L1 B--- U--- L6 L8 L3 1.0

8 Peter Barlay 14700831 1592 U--- U--- U--- U--- W7 L2 1.0

It's Not Dyslexic Being Easy

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 26, 2016 at 5:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my list of upsets.  I was not sure if I should have it on the list due to the time control.  The list of upsets started with dual-rated and standard-rated games only.  My quick-rated games were typically rated as another type of game.  Either they were USCF games that were dual-rated or CLUB games that were shorter than 20 minutes (G/20).  We used to have club ratings a long time ago.


However, Earle Wikle started a quick-rated tournament outside of the club site, and it was a purely quick event.  I noticed it was not being filtered out of my upset list.  Also, I thought that Earle's choice of time control (G/24;d/5) was actually longer than the G/30 wins that dominate my upset list.  Since both players can add 10 seconds to the game on each move, they can lengthen the game 10 minutes with a 60 move endgame.  So, 24 minutes became the fastest time for the list.


In addition to being a unique time control, I have had a hard time looking up this game in my database using the name search.  How hard is it to spell Anderson correctly.  If I can't find the game, how can I publish it?  I have always been rather poor in remembering people's names.  Plus, I have a friend on facebook named Arnar Gunnarsson from Iceland who only adds to the confusion.


However, I was able to shake off the confusion in this position and find the game-ending move.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202294379


It's Not Dyslexic Being Easy

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107563

 

[Event "IHOP Quick"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2015.04.17"]

[Round "4.2"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Andersen, Gunnar"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A26"]

[WhiteElo "1926"]

[BlackElo "2040"]

[PlyCount "63"]

[EventDate "2015.04.17"]

[TimeControl "1440"]

 

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. Nf3 f5

6. d3 d6 7. O-O Nf6 8. e4 fxe4 9. Nxe4 Nxe4 10. dxe4 O-O 11. Ne1 Be6 12. b3 Qd7

13. Nc2 a5 14. Be3 Bh3 15. Qd2 Rf7 16. Rad1 Raf8 17. f3 a4 18. c5 axb3 19. axb3

Bxg2 20. Kxg2 Qe6 21. Qd5 Qxd5 22. Rxd5 Rd8 23. cxd6 cxd6 24. Rfd1 Bf8 25. b4

Rfd7 26. Bb6 Rc8 27. R1d2 Ne7 28. R5d3 Rc6 29. Bf2 Rc4 30. b5 Nc8 31. Ne3 Rb4

32. Nd5 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On July 19th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a Quick event (6SS, G/24;d/5). 7 players joined.


Standings. July Quick


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 12728345 1984 W5 W3 D2 2.5

2 Earle P Wikle 12126030 1896 H--- W4 D1 2.0

3 Jeffrey R Fox 12641996 1851 W7 L1 W5 2.0

4 Mark McGough 11366481 1714 W6 L2 W7 2.0

5 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1634 L1 W7 L3 1.0

6 Douglas N Clark 15941617 567 L4 B--- U--- 1.0

7 Daniel J Rupp 15768473 960 L3 L5 L4 0.0

Unsigned, Unsealed, Undelivered

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 19, 2016 at 5:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night event: the July Mating Game.  This is a 2-week event, and this year, rounds 3 and 4 fell on the same night as the Pikes Peak Or Bust Rodeo Parade.  This parade travels right next to the chess club and makes parking much more difficult.  However, no one had to forfeit a game, and none of the late players even suffered a loss.


I thought the parade was going to be my toughest problem to deal with as a TD (tournament director) that night.  Of course, I had forgot about the fact that I had Shirley Herman in the event.


One of my jobs as TD is to get the prize winners signed.  This is typically one of the easiest parts of the jobs.  Prize winners are happy, joyful players who eagerly sign the prize sheet, shake your hand, and collect their money with a hearty "Thank You!"


However, Shirley is not normal.  She thinks she is the Von Miller of the Colorado Chess scene.  She refused to sign, holding out for more prize money.


She has made it her mission to fight for better conditions and higher prizes for the Class E chess player.  I belive she will sit out of another Millionare Open until GM Maurice Ashley and Amy Lee get $1,000,000 in the U1200 section.


I was going to call John Elway and ask him just how he got Von Miller signed.  However, I don't think John Elway ever had to deal with someone like Shirley.  I was talking to Cam Newton and Tom Brady who said, "Shirley Herman scares us."


I began to see what Cam and Tom were talking about after Shirley burst out into a profanity-laced tantrum when I told her she won a prize and asked her to sign.  I was stunned.  I have heard some bad stuff in my days but nothing like this.  It was worse than setting off Alex Torres; it was more offensive than reading a Brian Wall email; it was more shocking than a Redd Foxx record.  If Tipper Gore had heard it, she would have slapped a Parental-Advisory sticker over her mouth.


I figured that I would need some help with the negotiations:  alcohol.  So, a handful of us walked over to the Old Chicago's on Tejon for its closing after 34 years in downtown.  I don't know what drink Shirley ordered, but I wanted to stay sober and clear-minded to remain focused on my goal of getting all the prize winners signed.  Unfortunately, when I tried to order a Shirley Temple, I misspoke saying, "I will have the Shirley Herman," and got a glass of straight vinegar.


Well, I realized that you can't always get every prize winner signed.  So, I focused on the prize winners the club really wants back.  I got Daniel Herman signed.  I got Jeff Fox signed.  I got Brian Rountree signed.  I got Alex Freeman signed.  I just have Scott Williams and Shirley Herman left to sign.  I don't think I can afford Shirley Herman.  So, I will throw the little extra money I have left towards Scott and hope for the Chess Executive Of The Year award.


After all, Scott did create this week's Game Of The Week and this position.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202240418


Unsigned, Unsealed, Undelivered

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107487

 

[Event "July Mating Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.07.12"]

[Round "2.6"]

[White "Rupp, Dan"]

[Black "Williams, Scott"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C44"]

[WhiteElo "1023"]

[BlackElo "1163"]

[PlyCount "72"]

[EventDate "2016.07.05"]

[TimeControl "1800"]

 

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. e5 Bc5 5. Bc4

d5 6. Bg5 Nge7 7. Bd3 Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. gxf3 Nxe5 10. Bb5+ c6 11. Be2 h6 12.

Bh4 Qb6 13. f4 Nc4 14. b3 Bb4+ 15. Kf1 Nb2 16. Qc1 Bc3 17. Nxc3 dxc3 18. Qe1 d4

19. Bc4 O-O 20. Bxf7+ Rxf7 21. Bxe7 Re8 22. Qe6 Rexe7 23. Qc8+ Rf8 24. Qg4 Qb5+

25. Kg2 d3 26. cxd3 Qd5+ 27. Kh2 Nxd3 28. Rad1 c2 29. Rd2 Rxf4 30. Rxd3 Rxf2+

31. Kg3 Qxd3+ 32. Kh4 Kh7 33. Rg1 g5+ 34. Qxg5 hxg5+ 35. Rxg5 Rf4+ 36. Kh5

Qxh3# 0-1

 

This Week In Chess


On July 12th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its annual tradition: the July Mating Game (4SS, G/30;d/10). 13 players joined.


Standings. July Mating Game

# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Daniel Herman 14345456 2045 W4 W3 W5 W6 4.0 $20.00 1st

2 Jeffrey R Fox 12641996 1976 L11 W7 W12 W5 3.0 $13.00 2nd

3 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1877 W13 L1 D10 W9 2.5 $4.50 U1900

4 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1706 L1 W13 D9 W10 2.5 $9.50 U1900 + GOW

5 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1947 W8 W11 L1 L2 2.0

6 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2020 W10 W9 U--- L1 2.0

7 Shirley Herman 14812654 1096 L9 L2 W13 W11 2.0 [REFUSED TO SIGN FOR PRIZE]

8 Scott Ch Williams 15755696 1163 L5 L10 W11 W13 2.0 $8.00 U1600 + GOW

9 Mark McGough 11366481 1881 W7 L6 D4 L3 1.5

10 Sara Herman 14345441 1787 L6 W8 D3 L4 1.5

11 Dean W Brown 10224098 1507 W2 L5 L8 L7 1.0

12 Anthea Jan Carson 12614322 1632 H--- H--- L2 U--- 1.0

13 Daniel J Rupp 15768473 1023 L3 L4 L7 L8 0.0

July Mating Game

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 11, 2016 at 8:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night event:  the July Mating Game.  This is the 1st year the event has been played in July.  Previously, the event was named the June Mating Game, by Virgil McGuire back in 2002, and held in, you guessed it, June.


Prior to 2002, the event was named the June Borborgyms and was created in 1993.  The event didn't start recurring annually until 1996.  So, this year will be the 22nd edition.


The year for the best participation was in 2001 when 22 players joined the event.  However, a couple of times the event shrunk as small as a Quad (4 players) in 2010 and 2011.


The time control for the event has been 30 minutes, which is the fastest Standard-rated tournament possible.  It also makes this event both Quick-rated and Standard-rated and allows for a higher possibility of upsets, as players often have to move quicker at key points in the game or risk losing on time.


In this game, the underdog, Dan Rupp, has a shot at an upset over Alex Freeman.  Dan had been behind in material most of the game but has a chance to turn the tables.  However, time is often the key element.  Perhaps Dan's position improved as Alex got down in time.  Then Dan has to decide whether to use that time to find the best move or save that time to keep pressure on Alex and risk missing a killer move.  This positon might have benefited from a slower time control.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202191078


July Mating Game

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107426

 

[Event "July Mating Game"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.07.05"]

[Round "2.6"]

[White "Rupp, Dan"]

[Black "Freeman, Alex"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "1023"]

[BlackElo "1706"]

[PlyCount "74"]

[EventDate "2016.07.05"]

[TimeControl "1800"]

 

1. e4 d5 2. d3 dxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bf4 Bg4 5. f3

exf3 6. gxf3 Bh5 7. Qe2 e6 8. O-O-O c6 9. d4 Bb4 10. Qe5 Bxc3 11. bxc3 O-O 12.

d5 exd5 13. Bd3 Qa5 14. Bg5 Nbd7 15. Qd4 Qxa2 16. Nh3 Qa3+ 17. Kd2 Kh8 18. Rhe1

Bg6 19. Nf4 c5 20. Nxg6+ fxg6 21. Qh4 Kg8 22. Ra1 Ne5 23. Qh3 Qb2 24. Rab1 Nxd3

25. Rxb2 Nxb2 26. Rb1 Nc4+ 27. Kd3 Ne5+ 28. Ke2 Rae8 29. Rxb7 Nh5 30. f4 Nxf4+

31. Kd2 Nxh3 32. Bh6 Rf7 33. Rb3 Nf3+ 34. Kc1 Nhg5 35. c4 dxc4 36. Rc3 Rb7 37.

Bxg5 Re1# 0-1

 

This Week In Chess


On July 5th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held its annual tradition:  the July Mating Game (4SS, G/30;d/10).  12 players joined.


Standings. July Mating Game

# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Daniel Herman 14345456 2045 W8 W6 2.0

2 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2020 W7 W5 2.0

3 Aleksand Bozhenov 15525004 1947 W10 W4 2.0

4 Dean W Brown 10224098 1507 W9 L3 1.0

5 Mark McGough 11366481 1881 W11 L2 1.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1877 W12 L1 1.0

7 Sara Herman 14345441 1787 L2 W10 1.0

8 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1706 L1 W12 1.0

9 Jeffrey R Fox 12641996 1976 L4 W11 1.0

10 Scott Ch Williams 15755696 1163 L3 L7 0.0

11 Shirley Herman 14812654 1096 L5 L9 0.0

12 Daniel J Rupp 15768473 1023 L6 L8 0.0

I Can't Drive 55

Posted by Paul Anderson on July 5, 2016 at 4:45 PM Comments comments (1)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my list of upsets.  I have a report in my chess database called "Best Wins" which weeds out all my games except those where I score a 16 point rating gain or higher in a USCF-rated game.  So far, I have published 54 of the 57 upset games in that report.  This will be number 55.


My opponent was Rhett Langseth in 2014.  Rhett had just passed up my rating for the first time and had a shot to get added to the list as the highest rated 16-point upset.  A 16-point upset means that you are very close in rating (within 25 points) and possibly slightly lower.


Rhett has gotten to where he is in chess by being very cautious.  He is so cautious that he has refused to get his driver's license until they have perfected the self-driving car.  Instead, he just rolls himself in bubble-wrap and has his slightly less cautious dad drive him to chess events in their '43 Sherman Tank.


He takes his time making moves until he has seconds on his clock, and then he will flip the switch and blitz out his last ditch attack.  Because of this mastery over the clock, he rarely makes blunders and often catches me, in a better position, trying to run him out of time.


I think that he will blunder because he is the one low in time.  However, I end up moving just as quick and not taking advantage of my time lead.  So, it just becomes a battle of who has the better blitz skills, and he does.


However, I don't always throw away my wins.  We have split our 18 games.  I tend to mess up the quicker games (G/30 or less) where he has scored 6 of his nine wins.


This time I caught him in a rare blunder.  Rhett tries to take advantage of the Pin on the Queen.  The c Pawn cannot move without the loss of the Queen.  However, I found a decent move and went on to get upset number 55 from the guy who can't drive.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202153932


I Can't Drive 55

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107374

 

[Event "October Panera Wednesday"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2014.10.22"]

[Round "4.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Langseth, Rhett"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "2012"]

[BlackElo "2022"]

[PlyCount "115"]

[EventDate "2014.10.01"]

[TimeControl "5400"]

 

1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 c6 4. Nf3 Nbd7 5. Be2

e5 6. d5 Nc5 7. Nd2 Be7 8. Bf3 O-O 9. O-O Re8 10. Re1 Qc7 11. Nf1 a6 12. Be3

cxd5 13. Nxd5 Nxd5 14. Qxd5 Be6 15. Qd2 Rac8 16. Rec1 b5 17. Ng3 Red8 18. Ne2

Na4 19. c3 Nb6 20. Bxb6 Qxb6 21. Rd1 Rd7 22. Ng3 g6 23. Nf1 Rcd8 24. Ne3 Bg5

25. Nd5 Bxd5 26. Qxd5 Rc7 27. Qb3 Be7 28. Rd5 Rb8 29. a3 Rc4 30. Qc2 b4 31. Qe2

Rc5 32. axb4 Rxd5 33. exd5 Ra8 34. Qc4 Bd8 35. Qc6 Qxc6 36. dxc6 Ra7 37. Bd5

Kf8 38. Kf1 Ke7 39. Ke2 f6 40. Kd3 Bb6 41. f3 a5 42. bxa5 Rxa5 43. Rxa5 Bxa5

44. Kc4 Kd8 45. Kb5 Bc7 46. Ka6 f5 47. Kb7 g5 48. b4 e4 49. fxe4 fxe4 50. Bxe4

d5 51. Bxh7 g4 52. b5 g3 53. hxg3 d4 54. cxd4 Ba5 55. b6 Bxb6 56. Kxb6 Kc8 57.

Bf5+ Kd8 58. c7+ 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On June 28th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF-rated event (4SS, G/90+30). 14 players joined.


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2047 W3 H--- W2 W4 3.5 $24.00 1st

2 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1756 W11 W7 L1 W5 3.0 $16.00 2nd

3 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1791 L1 W8 D10 W7 2.5

4 Larry Turner 10303931 1812 W8 H--- D5 L1 2.0 $5.00 GOW

5 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1705 H--- X13 D4 L2 2.0 $11.00 Under 1750

6 Mark McGough 11366481 1854 L7 X14 W9 U--- 2.0

7 Dean W Brown 10224098 1513 W6 L2 D8 L3 1.5

8 Gerald Mena 12430450 1356 L4 L3 D7 W9 1.5

9 Douglas N Clark 15941617 578 H--- X12 L6 L8 1.5

10 Shawn Micha Irish 12615700 1820 H--- H--- D3 U--- 1.5

11 Peter Barlay 14700831 1887 L2 H--- U--- U--- 0.5

12 Pranav Maddali 15093864 1261 H--- F9 U--- U--- 0.5

13 Srinivas Maddali 15469577 1225 H--- F5 U--- U--- 0.5

14 Prajit Maddali 15490583 650 H--- F6 U--- U--- 0.5

Grimm's Lost Game

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 28, 2016 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my past.  I have recorded and saved every USCF tournament game that I have played (at standard time control).  In fact, it turns out that I have recorded more.


How is this possible?  Well, the USCF can and has lost games during the process of transmission from TD to the rating facility. 


I noticed this when I was looking at my statistics on the USCF website:


http://www.uschess.org/datapage/gamestats.php?memid=12728345


Since I started playing after the database began collecting a permanent record of every rated game, all my games should have been saved for posterity.  Well, at least, the results.  However, I noticed that my personal database of regular rated games had a couple more games than the USCF total.


I realized that I had saved a couple of games in my database that were forfeits.  The USCF may save a record of forfeitted games, but they do not count those games in the statistics.  However, I still had one more game in my database that the USCF had in theirs.


For a stat-guy like myself, this is like having a piece of fuzz on your face.  It is annoying until you fix it.


I was able to use the "Record by Year" search feature to narrow my search.  Fortunately, the tournament listed first was the one with the missing game.  I looked at the event, and I found that it have been rated without the 4th round.  So, everyone in the event lost their 4th round game.


Well, the fuzz was gone.  Now, I had to decide if I was going to delete the game like the USCF did?


It is hard for me to remove any game I have taken the time to enter into my chess database.  So, I decided to move it to my published games database and share it with the world.  Enjoy!


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202108623


Grimm's Lost Game

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107292

 

[Event "Winter Springs Open"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2001.12.02"]

[Round "4.1"]

[White "Grimm, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B18"]

[WhiteElo "1580"]

[BlackElo "1691"]

[PlyCount "94"]

[EventDate "2001.12.01"]

[TimeControl "40/7200:20/3600:20/3600"]

 

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Nf3 Nd7

7. Nh4 e6 8. Nxg6 hxg6 9. Be2 Bd6 10. Qd3 Ngf6 11. Bd2 Qc7 12. O-O-O O-O-O 13.

Kb1 Bf4 14. c4 Nc5 15. Bxf4 Qxf4 16. Qf3 Rxd4 17. Rxd4 Qxd4 18. Rd1 Qe5 19. h3

Rd8 20. Rxd8+ Kxd8 21. Kc2 Kc7 22. b4 Nce4 23. Qe3 Qg5 24. Qf3 Nxg3 25. fxg3

Qf5+ 26. Bd3 Qxf3 27. gxf3 Nh5 28. g4 Nf4 29. Bf1 Kd6 30. Kd2 Ke5 31. Ke3 g5

32. a3 b6 33. a4 b5 34. a5 a6 35. Bd3 bxc4 36. Bxc4 Nd5+ 37. Kd2 Nxb4 38. Kc3

c5 39. Kd2 Kd4 40. Be2 e5 41. Bd1 c4 42. Ba4 c3+ 43. Kc1 Ke3 44. Be8 f6 45. Bg6

Kxf3 46. Bf5 e4 47. Be6 e3 0-1

 

This Week In Chess


On June 21st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF-rated event (4SS, G/90+30). 14 players joined.


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2047 W6 H--- W2 2.5

2 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1756 W11 W7 L1 2.0

3 Mark McGough 11366481 1854 L7 X14 W9 2.0

4 Larry Turner 10303931 1812 W10 H--- D5 2.0 $5 GOW

5 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1705 H--- X13 D4 2.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1791 L1 W10 D8 1.5

7 Dean W Brown 10224098 1513 W3 L2 D10 1.5

8 Shawn Micha Irish 12615700 1820 H--- H--- D6 1.5

9 Douglas N Clark 15941617 578 H--- X12 L3 1.5

10 Gerald Mena 12430450 1356 L4 L6 D7 0.5

11 Peter Barlay 14700831 1887 L2 H--- U--- 0.5

12 Pranav Maddali 15093864 1261 H--- F9 U--- 0.5

13 Srinivas Maddali 15469577 1225 H--- F5 U--- 0.5

14 Prajit Maddali 15490583 650 H--- F3 U--- 0.5


Projected Prizes: 1st $24, 2nd $16, U1750 $11, GOW $5

Twice Bitten, Twice Shy

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 21, 2016 at 5:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

 

This week's game comes from my email match with my Dad.  It has been my Father's Day tradition to publish one of his wins.  This will be the 12th edition.  Happy Belated Father's Day to all the chess dads out there!


In addition to honoring my father, I also get to publish one of my losses.  I have another tradition of publishing 4 losses each year.  So, I have published 49 of my losses to date.  22 of the losses have been as White, and 27 of the losses have been as Black.


Some players think I never choose one of my losses for the Game Of The Week.  Usually, it is the players who have had a loss published by me who think that.


This year that player was Earle Wikle.  I checked my statistics and found out that Earle had gotten the short end of the stick when it comes to the Game Of The Week.  Twice he made the Game Of The Week, and twice it was his loss.  In fact, he had more losses than I did this year.


1 Anderson,Paul 2050 6.0/7

2 McGough,Mark 1854 1.5/2

3 Brown,Dean 1400 1.0/2

4 Friedman,Joe 2221 1.0/1

5 Bloomer,Josh 2241 1.0/1

6 Turner,Larry 1812 1.0/1

7 Brennan,Tim 1800 1.0/1

8 Mekonnen,Alex 1547 1.0/1

9 Rupp,Dan 962 1.0/1

10 Rountree,Brian 1778 0.5/2

11 Wikle,Earle 1950 0.0/2

12 Langseth,DuWayne 1749 0.0/1

13 Fox,Jeff 1706 0.0/1

14 Herman,Sara 1653 0.0/1

15 Williams,Jesse 1317 0.0/1

16 Anderson,Douglas 0.0/1

17 Barlay,Peter 1902 0.0/1

18 Kaye,Dylan 1534 0.0/1

19 Mena,Jerry 1356 0.0/1

20 Kilpatrick,John 592 0.0/1


So, it is no surprise, when Earle and I faced in the Denny's Quick June II and I won, that Earle was a little shy about letting me see his score sheet.  He said I had to have as many losses in the Game Of The Week before I could see it.


Well, here is my 2nd published loss of 2016 and my 50th overall. 


Stay tuned next week for my brilliancy against Earle!

 

Black to move


 

See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=202074812

 

Twice Bitten, Twice Shy

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107244

 

[Event "12-11-9"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2003.08.14"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A38"]

[PlyCount "112"]

[EventDate "2003.05.12"]

[TimeControl "0"]

 

1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. Nc3 Nc6 6.

O-O O-O 7. a3 d6 8. d3 e5 9. Bg5 h6 10. Bd2 a6 11. b3 Bd7 12. Rb1 Rb8 13. b4 b6

14. Qc1 Kh7 15. Qc2 Nd4 16. Nxd4 cxd4 17. Nd5 Nxd5 18. Bxd5 Qe7 19. e3 dxe3 20.

fxe3 f5 21. Bc3 h5 22. Bb2 Bh6 23. Qe2 Qg5 24. Rbe1 Rbe8 25. Kh1 f4 26. gxf4

exf4 27. e4 f3 28. Rxf3 Bg4 29. Ref1 Bxf3+ 30. Rxf3 Rxf3 31. Qxf3 Rf8 32. Qg3

Qe3 33. Qxe3 Bxe3 34. Bc3 Rf1+ 35. Kg2 Rf2+ 36. Kg3 Ra2 37. Kf3 Rxa3 38. Kxe3

Rxc3 39. Kd4 Rb3 40. Bb7 a5 41. bxa5 bxa5 42. Bc6 Kg7 43. h3 Kf6 44. Be8 h4 45.

Bc6 g5 46. Bd7 Rb7 47. Bc6 Ra7 48. Ba4 g4 49. hxg4 h3 50. Kc3 h2 51. Bc6 a4 52.

e5+ Kxe5 53. Kb2 Kd4 54. Be4 Rh7 55. Bxh7 h1=Q 56. Bf5 Qg2+ 0-1

 

This Week In Chess

 

On June 14th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF-rated event (4SS, G/90+30). 13 players joined.

 

Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1756 W9 W6 2.0

2 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2047 W7 H--- 1.5

3 Larry Turner 10303931 1812 W13 H--- 1.5

4 Calvin P Dejong 15617641 1705 H--- X11 1.5

5 Douglas N Clark 15941617 578 H--- X10 1.5

6 Dean W Brown 10224098 1513 W8 L1 1.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1791 L2 W13 1.0

8 Mark McGough 11366481 1854 L6 X12 1.0

9 Peter Barlay 14700831 1887 L1 H--- 0.5

10 Pranav Maddali 15093864 1261 H--- F5 0.5

11 Srinivas Maddali 15469577 1225 H--- F4 0.5

12 Prajit Maddali 15490583 650 H--- F8 0.5

13 Gerald Mena 12430450 1356 L3 L7 0.0

P Is For Pin V

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 13, 2016 at 9:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was. So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.



Pin is a chess move that immobilizes an opponent's piece.


The Pin is different from the other kinds of tactics in that it does not create multiple threats.  Its main function is to prevent a piece from moving.  A Pin on a target allows that target to be attacked by a lower value piece.  A Pin on a support allows the capture of the piece the support is guarding.


"The defensive power of a pinned piece is only imaginary."

(Aaron Nimzovich)


The Pin works by threatening a low value piece that has a higher value piece behind it.  The low value piece is stuck (as if with a pin) to the higher value piece due to the loss of material should the low value piece move and allow the capture of the higher value piece.


If the higher value piece is the King, the low value piece is absolutely immobilized, as the rules of Chess do not allow moves where the King could be captured.  Otherwise the Pin is relative, as the opponent can actually move the low value piece if he is willing to accept the loss of material.  The other types of Pins are rare:


  • Absolute (Pins a target to the King)
  • Relative (Pins a low value target to a higher value piece)
  • Cross (Multiple Pins on one piece)
  • Cross-check (blocks check and counter-checks)


Here is an example from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night event:  June Swiss 90.  Larry Turner has played chess in Colorado off and on since 1991, getting his rating as high as 1850.  Jerry Mena was playing chess out west in the late nineties before restarting in Colorado in 2013 and racking up 162 USCF-rated games. 


Larry caught Jerry in a position that was getting rough for Black.  Jerry missed the Pin, and Larry pounced on it.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=201999596


White found the hole in Black's defense with 21. Be6.  Now the Rook on f7 is Pinned to the King and can be captured anytime with the loss of an exchange.


P Is For Pin V

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=107200

 

[Event "CSCC June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2016.06.07"]

[Round "1.4"]

[White "Turner, Larry"]

[Black "Mena, Jerry"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E71"]

[WhiteElo "1812"]

[BlackElo "1356"]

[PlyCount "53"]

[EventDate "2016.06.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 d6

6. h3 O-O 7. Nf3 Nbd7 8. Be2 a6 9. a4 Qc7 10. O-O e5 11. dxe6 fxe6 12. Ng5 Ne5

13. f4 Nf7 14. Nxf7 Rxf7 15. Be3 Nd7 16. Qd2 b6 17. Rad1 Bxc3 18. Qxc3 e5 19.

Qd2 Bb7 20. Bg4 Nf6 21. Be6 Nxe4 22. Qe1 Raf8 23. fxe5 Kg7 24. Bxf7 Rxf7 25.

Rxf7+ Qxf7 26. exd6 Qd7 27. Qh4 1-0

 

This Week In Chess


On June 7th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held a USCF-rated event (4SS, G/90+30).  8 players joined.


Standings. June Swiss 90

# Name ID Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 12728345 2047 W7 1.0

2 Larry Turner 10303931 1812 W8 1.0

3 Alexander Freeman 14201087 1756 W5 1.0

4 Dean W Brown 10224098 1513 W6 1.0

5 Peter Barlay 14700831 1887 L3 0.0

6 Mark McGough 11366481 1854 L4 0.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 12477167 1791 L1 0.0

8 Gerald Mena 12430450 1356 L2 0.0


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