Colorado Springs Chess News

The Knights Are Better Here!

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My name is Paul Anderson (http://www.facebook.com/paul.anderson.904750), and I began the newsletter on March 1, 2004 as a way for me to receive and distribute any last minute schedule changes about local chess events and to put to use the analysis and publishing features of my Fritz 8.

However, I soon realized that I liked reporting on the results of my local club and adding some humorous comments about the games I was publishing.  So, during my chess season (typically February to August) the newsletter will contain at least a couple of articles from me (This Week In Chess and Game Of The Week). 

Every now and then, I will receive chess news, chess games, or other chess stuff from my readers, which I am more than happy to include, as I think it makes for a better newsletter.  It doesn’t matter where you are from or what the news is about (as long as it is about chess); you are welcome to contribute.

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O Is For Overload VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 18, 2018 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 10th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45574844-d-is-for-discovery-vi).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal, which I revisited on May 14th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45654476-r-is-for-removal-vii).  The third kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Overload.


Overload is a chess move that attacks a target.


The Overload is played when the player creates a threat on a target that cannot be defended.  The classic example is choosing a target and piling more attackers on it than supports the defender can muster.  When the number of attackers are greater than the number of supports, material can be won through a series of captures.  Each capture creates a new target until the final support is exhausted and an unguarded target appears.


However, the Overload is, perhaps, the most broad kind of tactic.  Not only does it use multiple attackers on one target, but also it uses a single attacker on multiple targets.  The idea is the same:  to gain a target than cannot be defended.   So, most players will become familiar with the different types of Overload:


  • Battery (Overload with multiple attackers on a file or diagonal)
  • Fork (Overload with multiple targets by the Knight)
  • Double Attack (Overload with multiple targets by the other pieces)
  • Over-Worked Piece (Overload with multiple targets)
  • Skewer (Overload with multiple targets where a high value piece is in front)


It is my Father's Day tradition to publish a win (over me) from my dad.  This game occurred early in our email match when my dad had the upper hand.  However, neither of us was good enough to catch the mistake in this position.


Black to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205146606


O Is For Overload VII

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112776


[Event "1-3"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "1997.01.14"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A45"]

[PlyCount "124"]

[EventDate "1996.10.04"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 Ne4 3. Bh4 d5 4. f3 Nd6 5. Nc3 c6 6. e4 Qa5 7.

Qd2 h6 8. Bd3 e6 9. e5 Nc4 10. Bxc4 dxc4 11. a3 b5 12. Nge2 Qc7 13. Qf4 Be7 14.

Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Qe4 Bb7 16. Qe3 O-O 17. O-O Nd7 18. Ne4 Nb6 19. Nd6 a5 20. c3 Ba6

21. f4 f5 22. Ng3 Nc8 23. Nxc8 Rfxc8 24. Nh5 Qh4 25. Qf3 Bb7 26. g3 Qh3 27.

Rad1 Rc7 28. g4 Qxg4+ 29. Qxg4 fxg4 30. Kf2 Rd8 31. Rg1 Kf8 32. Rxg4 c5 33. Rg3

cxd4 34. cxd4 b4 35. axb4 axb4 36. Rg6 c3 37. bxc3 bxc3 38. Ke3 c2 39. Rc1 Bd5

40. Rg3 Bb3 41. Rg2 Rc3+ 42. Kd2 Rc4 43. Nxg7 Rdxd4+ 44. Ke3 Rd1 45. Rcxc2 Rxc2

46. Nxe6+ Kf7 47. Rxc2 Bxc2 48. Nd4 Bb1 49. Nf3 Rh1 50. Kf2 Be4 51. Nd4 Rxh2+

52. Ke3 Bh7 53. f5 Rh5 54. Ke4 Rh4+ 55. Ke3 Rxd4 56. Kxd4 Bxf5 57. Ke3 Kg6 58.

Kf4 h5 59. Kf3 Kg5 60. Kg3 h4+ 61. Kf3 h3 62. Kg3 Bg4 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 15th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W11 W7 2.0

2 Sara Herman 1971 W18 W8 2.0

3 Peter Barlay 1927 W19 W10 2.0

4 Mark McGough 1779 W14 W6 2.0

5 Paul D Anderson 2032 D12 W16 1.5

6 Daniel Herman 2051 W17 L4 1.0

7 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W13 L1 1.0

8 Michael Smith II 1635 W20 L2 1.0

9 William Leo Wolf 1580 W21 U--- 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1571 W15 L3 1.0

11 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W20 1.0

12 Ayush Vispute 1207 D5 D17 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L7 W21 1.0

14 Daniel J Rupp 973 L4 W18 1.0

15 Joel Hicks unr. L10 W19 1.0

16 Scott Ch Williams 1243 H--- L5 0.5

17 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L6 D12 0.5

18 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L14 0.0

19 Shirley Herman 1105 L3 L15 0.0

20 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L8 L11 0.0

21 Tristan Cruz 745 L9 L13 0.0

Cruz Control

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 12, 2018 at 4:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's June Swiss 90 event.  The tournament is one of two slow time control, monthly events the club does each quarter.  The first month of a quarter is scheduled for the club's special events, which are typically much faster time controls.


However, even with the slower time control (G/90+30), some games end well before the allotted time.  This can mean that someone who comes with another person then has to wait until the other person finishes his game.  And these games can go three to five hours, depending on the number of moves.


This week, I ran into another problem.  My game was played on another player's set, which looked similar to the club sets.  This player finished quickly while my game was the last to finish.  The player who was done wanted his set to leave.


I decided to offer the player an extra game.  Therefore, I would not have to interrupt my opponent to replace the board.  Of course, the only player available to play an extra game was Tristan Cruz, who was willing to play.  However, his father finished his game just after I got Tristan started on an extra game.


Now, Tristan's father would have to wait for his son to finish his second game of the night.  So, I arranged another extra game for Tristan's father, Gerardo Cruz. 


It worked out well for Gerardo as he got to kill the time during Tristan's game with a victory of his own when he found the winning move in this position.

 

Black to move



See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205135082


Cruz Control

https://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112754


[Event "June Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.06.05"]

[Round "1.12"]

[White "Herman, Shirley"]

[Black "Cruz, Gerardo"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A53"]

[WhiteElo "1105"]

[BlackElo "1214"]

[PlyCount "88"]

[EventDate "2018.06.05"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d6 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 h6 4. Qb3 Nbd7 5. Bf4

c5 6. Nf3 g5 7. Bg3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Nc5 9. Qc2 e5 10. Nf3 Bg7 11. Rd1 Be6 12. Nxe5

O-O 13. b4 Na6 14. a3 Qe7 15. Nf3 Rfd8 16. e4 Rac8 17. Nb5 d5 18. Nxa7 Nxb4 19.

axb4 Qxb4+ 20. Qd2 Qxd2+ 21. Rxd2 Ra8 22. Bc7 Nxe4 23. Bxd8 Nxd2 24. Nxd2 Rxd8

25. Be2 Bc3 26. Nb5 Bb4 27. Bd3 dxc4 28. Nc7 Rxd3 29. Nxe6 fxe6 30. Ke2 Rxd2+

31. Ke3 c3 32. Ra1 Bc5+ 33. Ke4 c2 34. Rf1 Rd1 35. Ke5 Rxf1 36. h4 gxh4 37. g3

hxg3 38. f4 Rxf4 39. Kxe6 Kh7 40. Ke5 c1=Q 41. Ke6 Qe3+ 42. Kd7 Rd4+ 43. Kc8

Qe7 44. Kb8 Rd8# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On June 5th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its June Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. June Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2324 W12 1.0

2 Daniel Herman 2051 W13 1.0

3 Sara Herman 1971 W14 1.0

4 Peter Barlay 1927 W15 1.0

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1822 W16 1.0

6 Mark McGough 1779 W17 1.0

7 Michael Smith II 1635 W18 1.0

8 William Leo Wolf 1580 W19 1.0

9 Dean W Brown 1571 W20 1.0

10 Paul D Anderson 2032 D11 0.5

11 Ayush Vispute 1207 D10 0.5

12 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 0.0

13 Gerardo Cruz 1214 L2 0.0

14 Joey Arispe 1192 L3 0.0

15 Shirley Herman 1105 L4 0.0

16 Grayson Ed Harris 1009 L5 0.0

17 Daniel J Rupp 973 L6 0.0

18 Lawrence R Osborn 898 L7 0.0

19 Tristan Cruz 745 L8 0.0

20 Joel Hicks unr. L9 0.0

That's Your Excuse!

Posted by Paul Anderson on June 5, 2018 at 4:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


Brian Rountree burned up the competition at the May tournament of Club Chess like Kilauea throught the Hawaiian islands.  The damage was so complete there was no one left to stop him.  Well, that is until I got the call.  A Black Knight appeared in the sky, and I rushed over to the crime scene to put an end to Brian's devastation.



Paul Anderson (left) goes over the game with Brian Rountree (right)


This week's game comes from Brian Rountree and his chess blog:


https://linuxguyonfics.wordpress.com/2018/05/31/last-round-surprise/


"I know the local readership of this blog’s typical reaction 'Oh, look, that’s your excuse!'"


"I would have already made Expert if it weren't for playing Expert Paul Anderson.


My record against Paul is a shocking 5 wins, 34 losses and no draws (nearly all of these games, if not all played against him, I was a Class A player)!


In my last game against him, I was +2 as Black and still lost.  He practically makes me regurgitate my advantages against him in time-pressure (he also plays better in the later stages of a game).  I don't care how one does the math, if I had never played Paul I am a walking Expert.


It doesn't help to think about rating points like that, it's a total distraction.  It's almost a cliche the number of players who have made Expert, only to slam back down to their 1800 floor.  This happens at many levels.


In Canada, there are no floors, people make Expert and then can go below 1700 - I've seen this happen to a friend of mine.  Imagine going from 2034 to under 1700 at some point, and then starting the assault back to the top.


Experts, don't get to stay Experts, unlike Masters who stay Masters.  Most Experts in CO have figured out that the real goal, therefore, is to make Master.


For someone to casually hold an Expert rating, year after year, against lower-rated players, would suggest that they are still under-rated, particularly when they do beat Masters when given the opportunity (e.g., Paul A.)."


White to Mate In 2


See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205118504


That’s Your Excuse!

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112727

 

[Event "Club Chess May Classical"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.30"]

[Round "5.1"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Rountree, Brian"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "2017"]

[BlackElo "1870"]

[PlyCount "57"]

[EventDate "2018.05.30"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. Nf3 c5 5. e3 Nc6

6. O-O Be7 7. b3 O-O 8. Bb2 b6 9. Nbd2 Bb7 10. Re1 Rc8 11. c3 Qc7 12. Rc1 Rfd8

13. Bf1 e5 14. Bh3 e4 15. Bxc8 Bxc8 16. Nh4 Bg4 17. f3 exf3 18. Nhxf3 Ne4 19.

Kg2 Bd6 20. Qc2 Bxg3 21. Rf1 Bxh2 22. Nxe4 Bxf3+ 23. Rxf3 dxe4 24. Qxe4 Ne7 25.

Rh1 f5 26. Qe6+ Kh8 27. Rxh2 Rd6 28. Rxh7+ Kxh7 29. Rh3# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 29th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club held its May One Night Quick event (4SS, G/20;d/5).


Standings. May One Night Quick


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 1899 W6 W10 D2 W5 3.5 $10.50 1st

2 Mark McGough 1682 W9 W4 D1 W8 3.5 $10.50 1st

3 Michael Smith II 1572 L7 W11 W6 W4 3.0

4 Dean W Brown 1400 W14 L2 W7 L3 2.0

5 Larry Turner 1652 L13 W7 W8 L1 2.0

6 Joey Arispe 1272 L1 W12 L3 W11 2.0 $2.50 U1300

7 Clinton D Eads 985 W3 L5 L4 W14 2.0 $2.50 U1300

8 Calvin P Dejong 1588 W11 W13 L5 L2 2.0

9 Erasmus Eskeldson 1233 L2 W14 L10 W12 2.0

10 William Leo Wolf 1418 W12 L1 W9 U--- 2.0

11 Gerardo Cruz 1055 L8 L3 W13 L6 1.0

12 Tristan Cruz 456 L10 L6 W14 L9 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1127 W5 L8 L11 U--- 1.0

14 Douglas N Clark 445 L4 L9 L12 L7 0.0

The Tortoise And The Raccoon

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 26, 2018 at 5:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


Once upon a time there was a tortoise who, boasting how he could play chess better than anyone else, was forever teasing the raccoon for its ludicrous middle-game tactics.  Then one day, the raccoon answered back:  “Who do you think you are?  There’s no denying you’re good, but even you can be beaten!”  The raccoon squealed with laughter.


A game was planned, and the next day at the Colorado Springs Chess Club they stood at the board.  When the clock was winding down, the tortoise fell asleep because he was trying to stay at two minutes.


When the tortoise awoke, it was Mating.  "How is this possible?" the tortoise asked.


“The rabid raccoon makes King's Gambit players go insane and sacrifice pieces wildly!” LM Brian Wall said.


This week's game comes from Brian Rountree and his chess blog:


https://linuxguyonfics.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/the-raccoon/


"I have to give credit to Mark, he can defend, and likes to combine attack with defense;  in almost any irrational position, he whips up a defense and is quick to defend first.  Mark is more at home, when positions break down, than am I."


Black to Mate In 4


See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205095791


The Tortoise And The Raccoon

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112702


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.22"]

[Round "4.2"]

[White "Rountree, Brian"]

[Black "McGough, Mark"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C34"]

[WhiteElo "1868"]

[BlackElo "1770"]

[PlyCount "72"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 h5 4. Bc4 h4 5. d4 g5

6. Nc3 Bb4 7. O-O Bxc3 8. bxc3 d6 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Nxg5+ Qxg5 11. Bxf4 Qh5 12.

Qd3 Kg6 13. Qc4 Nf6 14. e5 Ne8 15. exd6 Nxd6 16. Qxc7 Nf5 17. Rae1 Nc6 18. Bd2

Rh7 19. Qf4 Bd7 20. d5 Nce7 21. c4 Rc8 22. Re4 a6 23. Rb1 b5 24. d6 Ng8 25. c5

Rxc5 26. c3 Nf6 27. Re7 Nxe7 28. dxe7 Rxe7 29. Qd6 Qe5 30. Qd3+ Bf5 31. Qf1

Bxb1 32. Qxb1+ Qe4 33. Qb3 Rd5 34. Qb2 Rxd2 35. Qxd2 Qe3+ 36. Qxe3 Rxe3 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 22nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Daniel Herman 2056 W8 D9 W4 D2 3.0 $26.75 1st

2 Sara Herman 1995 W15 W3 D5 D1 3.0 $26.75 1st

3 Mark McGough 1770 W21 L2 W14 W5 3.0 $26.75 1st + $5.00 GOW

4 Michael Smith II 1617 W13 W19 L1 W8 3.0 $26.75 1st + $5.00 GOW

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W18 W6 D2 L3 2.5

6 Paul D Anderson 2032 W14 L5 D9 W13 2.5

7 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W11 H--- U--- W10 2.5

8 Clinton D Eads 1310 L1 W21 W13 L4 2.0

9 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W16 D1 D6 U--- 2.0

10 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- W17 L7 2.0

11 Christophe Motley 1541 L7 H--- W20 U--- 1.5

12 Ross Inman unr. H--- U--- U--- W19 1.5

13 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L4 W16 L8 L6 1.0 $3.75 U1300

14 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L6 W18 L3 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300

15 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L17 W21 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300

16 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L9 L13 W18 U--- 1.0 $3.75 U1300 + $5.00 GOW

17 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W15 L10 U--- 1.0

18 Shirley Herman 1174 L5 L14 L16 D20 0.5

19 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L4 U--- L12 0.5

20 Dean W Brown 1598 U--- U--- L11 D18 0.5

21 Daniel J Rupp 973 L3 L8 L15 U--- 0.0

Revengers Insanity War

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 21, 2018 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (3)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the May Swiss 90 event at the Colorado Springs Chess Club.  It was won by my new hero, the Panda! 


For some reason, the Swiss Sys pairing program has to shorten players names, especially those who registered with a middle name.  In this case, it abbreviated Ayush Vispute's middle name to Pan. 


Ayush wanted me to know that was not his real middle name.  I took a stab in the dark and made a guess at what his name could be:  Panda.  It is an inside joke, as many of the abbreviations are quite comical.  Ayush noticed that Scott Williams looked like "Scottch" Williams, and I always think Brian Rountree is from Petticoat Junction, as his name is listed as "Brian Jo" Rountree.


I hope Ayush doesn't mind my nickname for him.  It makes him seem like a super hero to me.  Kind of like Ant Man, only with the power to eat bamboo.


Well, this super hero just took down the club's nemesis, Shirley Herman.  Shirley is the chess equivalent of Thanos The Mad Titan in Marvel Comic's "Avengers:  Invinity War."  She is on a mission to kill half of the chess clubs in the universe, abuse half the tournament directors (TDs), destroy half the volunteers, and make half the children cry.


We thought we were in the half to be killed when she was suspended from the Colorado Springs Chess Club  for a profanity-lace rant in 2016.  However, we may have gained a reprieve, as the Denver Chess Club's board voted to suspend  her on May 15th, and she is already on hostile terms with Club Chess!!, who she actively attacks on social media.


Now, she is going after volunteer TD, Earle Wikle.


In time, you will know what it's like to lose, to feel, so desperately, that you're right, yet to fail all the same.  Dread it!  Run from it!  Destiny still arrives!


However, it is my hope that I can assemble the revengers and come to Earle's aid.


Evacuate the playing hall!  Engage all suspensions!  And get this man a shield!




The first blow was struck by the Panda, but it may take more united action to end this threat to half the chess clubs.  God be with us!


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205084817


Revengers Insanity War

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112687

 

[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.15"]

[Round "3.9"]

[White "Vispute, Ayush"]

[Black "Herman, Shirley"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B15"]

[WhiteElo "1185"]

[BlackElo "1174"]

[PlyCount "33"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Bc4 Bf5 5. f3 e6

6. fxe4 Bg6 7. Nf3 Bb4 8. Qd3 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Nf6 10. Qe3 Bxe4 11. Ng5 Bxg2 12.

Nxf7 Qe7 13. Rg1 Kxf7 14. Rxg2 Nbd7 15. Ba3 Qxa3 16. Qxe6+ Kf8 17. Qf7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 15th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Sara Herman 1995 W13 W6 D3 2.5

2 Daniel Herman 2056 W7 D4 W5 2.5

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W19 W9 D1 2.5

4 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W16 D2 D9 2.0

5 Michael Smith II 1617 W12 W17 L2 2.0 $5.00 GOW

6 Mark McGough 1770 W18 L1 W14 2.0

7 Clinton D Eads 1310 L2 W18 W12 2.0

8 Derek Eskeldson 1302 H--- H--- W15 2.0

9 Paul D Anderson 2032 W14 L3 D4 1.5

10 Christophe Motley 1541 L11 H--- W20 1.5

11 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W10 H--- U--- 1.5

12 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L5 W16 L7 1.0

13 Joey Arispe 1192 L1 L15 W18 1.0

14 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L9 W19 L6 1.0

15 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W13 L8 1.0

16 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L4 L12 W19 1.0

17 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L5 U--- 0.5

18 Daniel J Rupp 973 L6 L7 L13 0.0

19 Shirley Herman 1174 L3 L14 L16 0.0

20 Dean W Brown 1598 U--- U--- L10 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $44.00; 2nd $29.00; U1800 $19.00; U1300 $13.00

R Is For Removal VII

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 14, 2018 at 4:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics.  It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery, which I revisited on April 10th (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/show/45574844-d-is-for-discovery-vi).  The second kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Removal.


Removal is a chess move that attacks a support.


The Removal is played when the player stops an opponent's piece from supporting the actual target.  The supporting piece will typically be of an equal or lesser value than the attacking piece.  However, the Removal can give up material, as the protection on the real target is now gone and creates a second attack that cannot be defended.


The target can be the King (Mate threat), a valuable piece (Material threat), or even a square (Mobility threat).


Different types of Removals are referred to by different names, but the idea is the same: The support of the target is removed.  Here are some names for the different types of Removal:

  • Clearance (Removal by passing support)
  • Deflection (Removal by forcing support to move)
  • Interference (Removal by interposition; Interception)
  • Undermining (Removal by capturing support; trade)
  • Sacrifice (Removal by capturing support; Exchange; Greek Gift, Desperado)


Here is an example from an email match I played with my Dad.  I am a Pawn ahead in Material.  However, one Pawn doesn't guarantee success.  Can you find the killer move?


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205070405


R Is For Removal VII

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112651


[Event "12-10-6"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2002.10.01"]

[Round "?"]

[White "Anderson, Paul"]

[Black "Anderson, Douglas"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D30"]

[PlyCount "101"]

[EventDate "2002.07.26"]

[TimeControl "0"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. a3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bg5 O-O 6.

e3 h6 7. Bh4 b6 8. Nf3 Bb7 9. Bd3 Nbd7 10. O-O Ne4 11. Bxe7 Qxe7 12. cxd5 exd5

13. Qc2 c5 14. Rac1 Rac8 15. Qa4 a6 16. Rfe1 Bc6 17. Qc2 b5 18. dxc5 Ndxc5 19.

Nxe4 Nxd3 20. Neg5 f6 21. Qxd3 fxg5 22. Nd4 Bb7 23. Qd2 Rc4 24. b3 Rcc8 25. Qb2

g4 26. Rxc8 Rxc8 27. Rc1 Rxc1+ 28. Qxc1 Qd7 29. Qc5 h5 30. Qb6 Kh7 31. Ne6 Qc6

32. Qxc6 Bxc6 33. b4 Bb7 34. Nc5 Bc8 35. f4 gxf3 36. gxf3 g5 37. Kf2 Kg6 38.

Nb3 h4 39. Nd4 Kf6 40. f4 g4 41. Nb3 Kf5 42. Ke2 g3 43. hxg3 h3 44. Kf3 Kg6 45.

Nd4 Bg4+ 46. Kf2 Bd7 47. Nf3 Kf5 48. g4+ Ke4 49. f5 Bxf5 50. Ng5+ Ke5 51. gxf5

1-0


This Week In Chess


On May 8th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Michael Smith II 1617 W9 W13 2.0

2 Sara Herman 1995 W15 W8 2.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W16 W7 2.0

4 Daniel Herman 2056 W10 D5 1.5

5 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W17 D4 1.5

6 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W14 H--- 1.5

7 Paul D Anderson 2032 W11 L3 1.0

8 Mark McGough 1770 W18 L2 1.0

9 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L1 W17 1.0

10 Clinton D Eads 1310 L4 W18 1.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L7 W16 1.0

12 William Leo Wolf 1550 U--- W15 1.0

13 Grayson Ed Harris 1010 H--- L1 0.5

14 Christophe Motley 1541 L6 H--- 0.5

15 Joey Arispe 1192 L2 L12 0.0

16 Shirley Herman 1174 L3 L11 0.0

17 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L5 L9 0.0

18 Daniel J Rupp 973 L8 L10 0.0

Extra Credit

Posted by Paul Anderson on May 8, 2018 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Mike Smith II.  This time, the game was created with the help of Joey Arispe at the May Swiss 90 tournament.  Joey started at the Colorado Springs Chess Club in August 2017, and he has almost established a USCF rating.


I guess it takes 26 games to establish a rating with the USCF.  Before that, you are considered provisionally rated.  That means different rules apply to you in regards to calculating your rating and playing in matches.


Joey and Mike have never faced each other before.  It was a close game until Mike deployed his usual "throw-away-any-kind-of-positional-advantage-to-sacrifice-a-piece-for-a-cheap-mate-shot" strategy.  And it worked!


Of course, he missed the mate.


Black to mate



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205058797


Extra Credit

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112632


[Event "May Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.05.01"]

[Round "1.9"]

[White "Arispe, Joey"]

[Black "Smith, Mike"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A47"]

[WhiteElo "1192"]

[BlackElo "1617"]

[PlyCount "84"]

[EventDate "2018.05.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 b6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Nbd2 Be7 5. h3

O-O 6. e3 Nd5 7. Bh2 f5 8. Bd3 Nb4 9. Be2 Bb7 10. a3 Nd5 11. c4 Nf6 12. b4 Ne4

13. Nxe4 fxe4 14. Nd2 Bh4 15. O-O Qf6 16. Bg3 d6 17. Bg4 Bg5 18. Qc2 Qg6 19.

Qb3 h5 20. Bd1 Nd7 21. Bc2 Nf6 22. f3 Bxe3+ 23. Qxe3 Qxg3 24. Nxe4 Bxe4 25.

Bxe4 Rae8 26. Bc6 Re7 27. a4 Nh7 28. Bd5 Ng5 29. Kh1 c6 30. Bxc6 Nxh3 31. a5

Rf4 32. axb6 axb6 33. Ra8+ Kf7 34. Be8+ Kf6 35. Bxh5 g6 36. Bg4 Ng5 37. Rf8+

Nf7 38. c5 Kg7 39. cxd6 Ra7 40. Re8 Ra2 41. Bh3 Rh4 42. Kg1 Rxh3 0-1


This Week In Chess


On May 1st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the May Swiss 90 event (4SS, G/90+30).


Standings. May Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2328 W9 1.0

2 Daniel Herman 2056 W10 1.0

3 Paul D Anderson 2032 W11 1.0

4 Sara Herman 1995 W12 1.0

5 Calvin P Dejong 1872 W13 1.0

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1868 W14 1.0

7 Mark McGough 1770 W15 1.0

8 Michael Smith II 1617 W16 1.0

9 Christophe Motley 1541 L1 0.0

10 Clinton D Eads 1310 L2 0.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1243 L3 0.0

12 Joey Arispe 1192 L4 0.0

13 Ayush Pan Vispute 1185 L5 0.0

14 Shirley Herman 1174 L6 0.0

15 Daniel J Rupp 973 L7 0.0

16 Lawrence R Osborn 905 L8 0.0

What's Your Name

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 30, 2018 at 9:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Mike Smith II.  His name is so common that he needs a number to set himself apart.  Mike joined the Colorado Springs Chess Club in 2017 and started with a 1255 rating.  He quickly shot up 400 rating points as he adjusted to tournament chess.  However, he has been up and down ever since.


At the Cabin Fever Reliever, the story stayed the same.


He was supreme in his first two rounds, with 2 wins.  Then he landed on board 1 against NM Buck Buchanan.  He had already beaten Buck in the City Championship last year and had his best shot to earn his inaugural 1st place. 


However, the down side was about to rear its ugly head again.  Mike crashed and burned in the next 2 games, with 2 devastating losses.  It was so bad he talked about changing his name.


Of couse, it is not unusual for chess players to change their name.  Most chess players have done so, at one time or another, for various reasons.  In fact, every player who played in the 2018 Colorado Closed Championship this year had already changed their name.



Colorado Closed, Round 1 - NM Lior Lapid vs CM Kevin Seidler


2018 Colorado Closed Championship


Place, Score, Name, Original Name


1st  4.0  NM Lior Lapid - Lior Smith

2nd 3.5  IM Michael Mulyar - Michael Johnson

2nd 3.5  FM Nikhilesh Kunche - Nikhilesh Williams

4th 2.0  NM Gunnar Andersen - Gunnar Anderson

4th 2.0  LM Richard Shtivelband - Richard Brown

5th 0.0  CM Kevin Seidler - Kevin Jones


So, it is understandable that Mike would want to change his name.  Who would want to be associated with this position.  This is the Jeff Gillooly of chess positions.  Coincidentally, Jeff Gillooly changed his name to Mike Smith III.


Black to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205039746


What's Your Name

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112602


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.04.24"]

[Round "3.1"]

[White "Smith, Mike"]

[Black "Buchanan, Richard"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C44"]

[WhiteElo "1641"]

[BlackElo "2010"]

[PlyCount "70"]

[EventDate "2018.04.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. c3

d3 6. Qxd3 d6 7. b4 Bb6 8. b5 Nce7 9. Bb3 Nf6 10. Bb2 O-O 11. O-O Ng6 12. c4

Nf4 13. Qd2 Ne6 14. Nc3 Nc5 15. Bc2 Be6 16. Qe2 Re8 17. Rad1 Qc8 18. Ng5 Bg4

19. Nf3 Qe6 20. Rfe1 Ncd7 21. Qd3 Bxf3 22. gxf3 Ne5 23. Qe2 Qh3 24. Rd3 Nxd3

25. Bxd3 Re5 26. Bc1 Ba5 27. Qe3 Rh5 28. Bb1 Qxh2+ 29. Kf1 Qh1+ 30. Ke2 Qg2 31.

c5 Rxc5 32. Bd2 Re8 33. Rf1 Bxc3 34. Bxc3 Nd5 35. Qd3 Nf4+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 24th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45d10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Richard Buchanan 2010 W9 W2 W3 W4 4.0 $26.00 1st

2 Mark McGough 1795 W7 L1 W5 W3 3.0 $17.00 2nd

3 Michael Smith II 1641 W10 W4 L1 L2 2.0

4 Supreme King 1972 W5 L3 W8 L1 2.0

5 Gilber Gaxiola Jr 1317 L4 W10 L2 W7 2.0 $11.00 U1500

6 Paul D Anderson 2039 H--- H--- U--- W10 2.0

7 Ayush Pan Vispute 1179 L2 D9 W10 L5 1.5

8 Larry Turner 1745 W11 H--- L4 U--- 1.5 $5.00 GOW

9 Dean W Brown 1425 L1 D7 U--- U--- 0.5

10 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L3 L5 L7 L6 0.0

11 Grayson Ed Harris 1034 L8 U--- U--- U--- 0.0

One Good Turner Deserves Another

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 23, 2018 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Larry Turner.  Larry is a long-time, Colorado chess player.  His tournament results stretch back into the early nineties and, possibly, even further.  However, he doesn't get to play a lot of games, only racking up 164 regular-rated games since 1991.  In comparison, Dean Brown has 3,257 since 1992.


He does stop by the club when he can and drop off candy and chess books.  He is the chess equivalent of the Easter Bunny.  If all the members of the club have been good over the past year, we get a bag of candy and a new chess book for our library.  If any member has been harassing TDs or bullying other players on social media, we get a glass of straight vinegar.


This year's book has been especially popular.  When all our members showed up on the good list for the second year in a row, Larry brought us The Triangle System by Ruslan Scherbakov.  It has jumped to the top of our hot check-out list!


So, when I ran across this crazy, tactical position in Larry's only game this year, it seemed fitting to return the gesture and award him with the Game Of The Week.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205023516


One Good Turner Deserves Another

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112564


[Event "Cabin Fever Reliever"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.04.17"]

[Round "1.4"]

[White "Turner, Larry"]

[Black "Harris, Grayson"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E01"]

[WhiteElo "1745"]

[BlackElo "1034"]

[PlyCount "71"]

[EventDate "2018.04.17"]

[TimeControl "2700"]


1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 c5 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 e6 5. O-O Nf6

6. c4 Bd6 7. Nc3 dxc4 8. Qa4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 O-O 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bxc6 Bd7 12.

Rd1 Qc7 13. Bxd7 Nxd7 14. Nb5 Qb8 15. Nxd6 Nb6 16. Qc2 Nd5 17. Nxc4 Rc8 18. b3

Nb6 19. Bf4 e5 20. Be3 Qc7 21. Bxb6 axb6 22. Rac1 b5 23. Ne3 Qxc2 24. Rxc2 Rxc2

25. Nxc2 f6 26. Nb4 Kf7 27. Rd7+ Kg6 28. Rb7 Rc8 29. Rxb5 Kg5 30. f4+ Kg4 31.

fxe5 Kf5 32. exf6+ Ke4 33. Kf2 Rf8 34. Rb6 gxf6 35. a4 Kd4 36. Nd3 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 17th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the Cabin Fever Reliever event (4SS, G/45d10).


Standings. Cabin Fever Reliever


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Richard Buchanan 2010 W7 W5 2.0

2 Michael Smith II 1641 W9 W4 2.0

3 Larry Turner 1745 W10 H--- 1.5

4 Supreme King 1972 W6 L2 1.0

5 Mark McGough 1795 W8 L1 1.0

6 Gilber Gaxiola Jr 1317 L4 W9 1.0

7 Dean W Brown 1425 L1 D8 0.5

8 Ayush Pan Vispute 1179 L5 D7 0.5

9 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L2 L6 0.0

10 Grayson Ed Harris 1034 L3 U--- 0.0

Puncher's Chance

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 17, 2018 at 5:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week

By Tim Brennan


Thanks Paul for inviting me back for another Tim Brennan week in the Colorado Springs Chess Newsletter!


Today I would like to share my experience playing in the Colorado vs New Mexico team match last fall.  The Colorado vs New Mexico matches go back a few years, and I believe the idea was started by Paul Covington (although it might have been Klaus Johnson).  Each year the event is hosted by a different state.


Last year (2017), it was held in Santa Fe, which is the capital of New Mexico.  Santa Fe is also home of my favorite author George R. R. Martin who wrote the Game of Thrones books.  GRRM is also a life member of the USCF!


I was the TD for the Colorado vs New Mexico match a few years ago when it was held in Trinidad.  So, I was pretty familiar with the format and knew the event was a lot of fun.  These tournaments are similar to the Scholastic Closed, where there are always last minute drop outs and no shows.


For the 2017 tournament, it was announced that it was going to be held in the capital building, which I thought sounded very exciting.  I love tournaments that are held in nice and exotic locations.


They were holding a side event that was open to everyone.  So, I decided I would drive down to Santa Fe and play in that.  I had done nothing to qualify in the team tournament, and didn't even play in the class championship, which determines who represents Colorado.  As I was driving down that Friday, Brian Wall texted me to let me know that Chris Peterson, who was supposed to play board one, dropped out at the last minute. Brian wanted to know if I could take Chris's place on the team.


Of course, Chris is a much stronger player than I am, but when you are man short you have to take any warm body that you can find!  Much like when the Chicago Blackhawks signed a 36 year old accountant earlier this year to be their backup goalie - and he ended up in the game!


The day of the tournament I ended up on board 2, the "master/expert" board, even though my brief tenure as an "expert" ended faster than a Britney Spears Vegas marriage.  I found out I was paired against Philip Bauer (rated 2102).  Brian sat next to me on board 1.


The event was absolutely beautiful! We sat right in the middle of the capital in a circle under the domed ceiling.  They had flags and nice boards for us to play on.


Round 1, Brian and I both lost, but the team score was 5-5.


After round 1, everyone went out for a nice lunch at a Mexican restaurant which was great.  That night was the Connor McGregor vs Floyd Mayweather fight, which I really wanted to watch.  Most people predicted that Mayweather would win, but McGregor had a "puncher's chance."  I felt the same way going into my second round game.


In round 2, I was able to get my pieces on some active squares, and then my opponent let down his guard and allowed me a sucker punch.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=205008223


After the dust settled in round 2, Colorado came out a game ahead and won the match 11-9.  I was happy that I was able to contribute and put Colorado over the top with my 300 point upset win!  That night Brian, Philip (my opponent in the match) and I all watched the McGregor fight, which was a blast!


Thank you to the fine folks in New Mexico who put on such an awesome event! This will be a tournament and weekend I will never forget.


Puncher's Chance

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112502


[Event "NM vs CO"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.08.26"]

[Round "2.2"]

[White "Brennan, Tim"]

[Black "Bauer, Philip"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B18"]

[WhiteElo "1821"]

[BlackElo "2102"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2017.08.26"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. Bc4 e6 7. N1e2 Nf6 8.

O-O Nbd7 9. f4 b5 10. Bb3 a5 11. c3 a4 12. Bc2 Bxc2 13. Qxc2 Bd6 14. f5 e5 15.

Bg5 h6 16. Bh4 Qb6 17. Kh1 exd4 18. Nxd4 O-O 19. Ne4 Nxe4 20. Qxe4 c5 21. Nf3

Rfe8 22. Qg4 Re2 23. f6 Nxf6 24. Bxf6 Bf8 25. Bh4 Rae8 26. Rae1 c4 27. a3 R8e6

28. Nd4 Rxe1 29. Rxe1 Rg6 30. Qc8 Qa6 31. Qxa6 Rxa6 32. Re8 g5 33. Bg3 f6 34.

Re6 1-0


This Week In Chess


On April 10th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Rd 6 Tot Prize

1 Peter Barlay 1617 W8 L3 D11 W6 W2 W4 4.5 $36.00 1st

2 Mark McGough 1648 W6 W4 W7 W3 L1 L5 4.0 $6.00 2nd

3 Paul D Anderson 1930 W11 W1 W5 L2 L4 W6 4.0 $6.00 2nd

4 Michael Smith II 1508 W12 L2 W10 W5 W3 L1 4.0 $6.00 2nd

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1643 W13 W10 L3 L4 W7 W2 4.0 $6.00 2nd

6 Scott Ch Williams 1294 L2 W12 W13 L1 W10 L3 3.0 $8.00 U1500

7 Supreme King 1889 L10 W13 L2 W8 L5 W12 3.0

8 Grayson Ed Harris 1011 L1 L11 W12 L7 W13 W10 3.0 $8.00 U1500

9 Joey Arispe 1208 H--- U--- U--- L10 W12 W13 2.5

10 Dean W Brown 1409 W7 L5 L4 W9 L6 L8 2.0

11 William Leo Wolf 1477 L3 W8 D1 U--- U--- U--- 1.5

12 Lawrence R Osborn 986 L4 L6 L8 W13 L9 L7 1.0

13 Clinton D Eads 1052 L5 L7 L6 L12 L8 L9 0.0

D Is For Discovery VI

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 10, 2018 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


A couple years back, I came up with a method to organize chess tactics.  I called it the DROP Method (http://cschess.webs.com/apps/blog/categories/show/1378181-drop-method).  The DROP method is an acronym for the basic kinds of tactics. It is meant to remind you not to drop your pieces and help you get your opponent to drop theirs.


I said that the DROP Method was a work in progress, and it was.  So, I thought I would revisit each of the four kinds of chess tactics to provide more examples.  The first kind of tactic in the DROP Method is Discovery.


Discovery is a chess move that attacks with two pieces.


The Discovery is played when a player is going to make an attack with the piece that he moves, but also he will make an attack with another piece that was blocked by the piece that he moves.  When the Discovery is successful, the opponent can only avoid one of the attacks.  This means that the other attack will gain material or mate.   The second attack is often a check on the King, which is called a Discovered Check.


"Discovered check is the dive bomber of the Chessboard."

(Reuben Fine)


Here is a position from a game played between Larry Osborn and  Ayush "Panda" Vispute in the March Swiss 90 from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's Tuesday night monthly tournament.


Black to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204991018


The Discovery is played by moving the Rook to c1.  This move is an attack on the White King, the Discovered Check.  White has to move the King.  However, when the Discovery is added into the mix, the attack is unstoppable.  The Rook move reveals an attack on the White Bishop.


The first attack is a check of the King.  The second attack is a capture of the Bishop. White has to defend the King by the rules of the game.  The Bishop has been lost along with the hopes of winning a close endgame.


So, by just being observent, a player can find these Discovery opportunities and save that point.


D Is For Discovery VI

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112459

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.20"]

[Round "3.7"]

[White "Osborn, Larry"]

[Black "Vispute, Ayush"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D30"]

[WhiteElo "974"]

[BlackElo "1209"]

[PlyCount "78"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Bf4 c5 4. e3 Nf6 5. Nf3 b6

6. g3 Bb7 7. Bg2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Nbd2 Nbd7 10. Re1 a6 11. Ng5 b5 12. b3 h6

13. Ngf3 Nb6 14. Ne5 g5 15. dxc5 Nxc4 16. Nexc4 gxf4 17. Nb6 fxe3 18. Rxe3 Bxc5

19. Nxa8 Bxe3 20. fxe3 Qxa8 21. Qf3 Ne4 22. Qg4+ Kh7 23. Nxe4 f5 24. Nf6+ Rxf6

25. Qd4 Rg6 26. Rc1 Rg7 27. Qe5 Re7 28. Qf6 Qe8 29. Qh4 Rg7 30. Bf3 Qe7 31. Qd4

e5 32. Qb6 Rg6 33. Rc7 Rxb6 34. Rxe7+ Kg6 35. Rxe5 Kf6 36. Re8 Rc6 37. Bxd5

Rc1+ 38. Kf2 Bxd5 39. h4 Rc2+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On April 3rd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the April Quick Six event (6SS, G/24+5).


Standings. April Quick Six


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Mark McGough 1648 W5 W4 W10 3.0

2 Paul D Anderson 1930 W7 W6 W3 3.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1643 W11 W8 L2 2.0

4 Michael Smith II 1508 W12 L1 W8 2.0

5 Scott Ch Williams 1294 L1 W12 W11 2.0

6 Peter Barlay 1617 W9 L2 D7 1.5

7 William Leo Wolf 1477 L2 W9 D6 1.5

8 Dean W Brown 1409 W10 L3 L4 1.0

9 Grayson Ed Harris 1011 L6 L7 W12 1.0

10 Supreme King 1889 L8 W11 L1 1.0

11 Clinton D Eads 1052 L3 L10 L5 0.0

12 Lawrence R Osborn 986 L4 L5 L9 0.0

A Time Of Testing

Posted by Paul Anderson on April 3, 2018 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's March Swiss 90 tournament.  It was unusual in that I was not a tournament director (TD) in any way for this event.  My TD certification had expired.  Fortunately, we have a number of authorized TDs for the club, and Peter Barlay stepped in as Chief TD.


It is hard to believe it has been 3 years since I became a TD to help save the Colorado Springs Chess Club on Tuesday nights.  The USCF gives you 3 years before your certification expires.  However, they don't do much else.  I didn't get an email reminder that my time was up.  I didn't get a letter in the mail saying, "Thanks for your service!  We want you back.  Here is how to renew."  Nothing.  They just lock you out of the TD website.


The rule book mentions that a test is required after 3 years to continue being a TD.  However, it doesn't say much else.  I wasn't told when to take the test.  I wasn't told where to take the test.  Nothing.  They just lock you out of the TD website.


Well, I had to do a little digging, but I found where to get the test.  It is funny because I also have to take a test to continue my insurance license and they both are due in April.  It will be a month of tests and taxes.  How fun!


Of course, I was surprised to see that the government does a better job than the USCF does in helping you take their tests.  Although the government is just as bad in regards to helping you with taxes.  I ordered my tax forms in January and just got them in March.  I guess that is the difference between State and Federal.


Anyway, this tournament needed a TD ruling.  So, Peter jumped in to give his certified opinion.  On move 26, Chris played Bh6, jumping over a Pawn in the process.  Peter awarded Mike 2 minutes for Chris' infraction.  Mike declined the time, and the game resumed.  Peter was worried about the fact that he did not tell Chris that touch move still applies.


He came to me for my uncertified opinion.  I tend to be a laissez-faire TD and told him to wait until the players make another request for a ruling.  They never did.  Luckily, the player, who made the illegal move, moved the touched piece legally and went on to win.  However, he did miss this mating line.


White to mate


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204974973


A Time Of Testing

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112429


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.27"]

[Round "4.4"]

[White "Motley, Chris"]

[Black "Smith, Mike"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B10"]

[WhiteElo "1556"]

[BlackElo "1644"]

[PlyCount "67"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c6 2. Nc3 d5 3. Nf3 d4 4. Ne2 c5 5. c3 Nc6

6. cxd4 cxd4 7. Qa4 Bd7 8. Nexd4 e5 9. Nxc6 Bxc6 10. Bb5 Bd6 11. Bxc6+ bxc6 12.

Qxc6+ Kf8 13. O-O Ne7 14. Qa4 h5 15. d4 Ng6 16. dxe5 Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Bxe5 18. Rd1

Qh4 19. g3 Qg4 20. f4 h4 21. Rd5 hxg3 22. Qa3+ Bd6 23. Qxg3 Bc5+ 24. Rxc5 Qd1+

25. Kf2 Qh1 26. Bd2 Qxa1 27. Bc3 Rh7 28. Rg5 g6 29. f5 Qh1 30. Bb4+ Kg7 31.

Rxg6+ fxg6 32. Qxg6+ Kh8 33. Bc3+ Rg7 34. Qxg7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 27th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90

# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Josh S Bloomer 2353 H--- W8 W6 W2 3.5 $44.00 1st

2 Paul D Anderson 2045 W14 D3 W5 L1 2.5 $10.00 2nd

3 Calvin P Dejong 1837 W16 D2 W15 U--- 2.5 $10.00 2nd

4 Edward D Boldt 1836 H--- L11 W13 W6 2.5 $10.00 2nd

5 Michael St Filppu 1654 W20 H--- L2 W7 2.5 $19.00 U1800

6 Brian Jo Rountree 1854 W7 W15 L1 L4 2.0

7 Scott Ch Williams 1203 L6 W20 W16 L5 2.0 $13.00 U1205

8 Dean W Brown 1422 W21 L1 U--- W13 2.0

9 Christophe Motley 1556 H--- H--- U--- W10 2.0 $5.00 GOW

10 Michael Smith II 1644 H--- L12 W14 L9 1.5 $5.00 GOW

11 Daniel Herman 2107 H--- W4 U--- U--- 1.5

12 Sara Herman 1942 H--- W10 U--- U--- 1.5

13 Joey Arispe 1123 L15 W17 L4 L8 1.0 $5.00 GOW

14 Clinton D Eads 1250 L2 L19 L10 W20 1.0

15 Mark McGough 1804 W13 L6 L3 U--- 1.0

16 Joseph Reininger 1193 L3 W21 L7 U--- 1.0

17 Ayush Pan Vispute 1209 L18 L13 W21 U--- 1.0

18 Peter Barlay 1925 W17 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

19 Shirley Herman 1115 U--- W14 U--- U--- 1.0

20 Grayson Ed Harris 1002 L5 L7 U--- L14 0.0

21 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L8 L16 L17 U--- 0.0

Country Jam, Take Me Home

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 26, 2018 at 7:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from Mike Smith.  Mike has been a Supporting Member of the Colorado Springs Chess Club since 2017.  He typically plays on Tuesday nights and last year scored a perfect 50% with 27 wins and 27 losses (1 draw).  His most common opponent is Brian Rountree and yet he still renewed his Supporting Membership for 2018.


The past 2 years, he has joined my March Madness group, picking West Virginia to win back-to-back titles.  This must be his alma mater, and his loyality is blinding his ability to recognize seeding numbers.  Of course, this year, that blindness was not much of a handicap with the majority of the teams in the tournament unable to play up to their seeding rank. 


You were in huge trouble if the famous alumi of Loyola University Chicago, Bob Newhart, was in your March Madness group.  He would have scored tons of bonus points.  Unfortunately, our group didn't do much better with Florida State alum, Dean Brown, stealing the crown with his crazy, upset picks.


Of course, the boy from the Blue ridge mountains and Shenandoah river wasn't as lucky this year with Villinova crushing West Virginia, but I still like Mike because he likes my stuff on Facebook. 


Colorado Springs Chess News on Facebook


More than any other Facebook friend, Mike likes my chess posts.  So, now his stuff pops to the top of my feed.  I get to see all his country boy antics like getting into bar fights, getting dumped by his girlfriends, and getting his pick-up truck repossessed.


The last post invited me to go camping with him at Country Jam 2018 for $250.  While I like homemade preservatives as much as the next guy, that is just way too much money for what is mostly a breakfast stable.


However, if it will help raise funds for your fruity campout, I will give you the Game Of The Week prize for missing this obvious move against Clint Eads.


White to move



You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204956826


Country Jam, Take Me Home

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112365


[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.20"]

[Round "3.6"]

[White "Smith, Mike"]

[Black "Eads, Clint"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "1644"]

[BlackElo "1250"]

[PlyCount "103"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e5 4. dxe5 dxe5 5.

Qxd8+ Kxd8 6. Bg5 Ke8 7. Nf3 Bd6 8. O-O-O Be6 9. Bb5+ Nc6 10. Bxf6 gxf6 11. Nd5

Bxd5 12. exd5 a6 13. Bxc6+ bxc6 14. dxc6 Ke7 15. Rhe1 Rhg8 16. g3 Rab8 17. Rd3

Rb6 18. Nd4 Kf8 19. Nf5 Rxc6 20. Red1 Rg5 21. Nxd6 cxd6 22. Rxd6 Rxd6 23. Rxd6

a5 24. Rxf6 Kg7 25. Rf3 e4 26. Rf4 Re5 27. Kd2 Rb5 28. b3 a4 29. Rxe4 axb3 30.

cxb3 Rd5+ 31. Kc3 Rd1 32. a4 Rf1 33. Rf4 Rc1+ 34. Kb4 Rh1 35. h4 Re1 36. a5 Re5

37. a6 Re8 38. Ka4 Re6 39. Kb5 Re5+ 40. Kb6 Re6+ 41. Kb7 Re7+ 42. Kc8 Re8+ 43.

Kd7 Ra8 44. Ra4 Ra7+ 45. Kc6 Re7 46. a7 Re6+ 47. Kd5 h5 48. a8=Q Rg6 49. Rf4

Re6 50. Qb7 Rg6 51. Rxf7+ Kh6 52. Rh7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On March 20th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2045 W18 D2 W7 2.5

2 Calvin P Dejong 1837 W12 D1 W11 2.5

3 Josh S Bloomer 2353 H--- W15 W4 2.5

4 Brian Jo Rountree 1854 W5 W11 L3 2.0

5 Scott Ch Williams 1203 L4 W20 W12 2.0

6 Edward D Boldt 1836 H--- L9 W13 1.5

7 Michael St Filppu 1654 W20 H--- L1 1.5

8 Michael Smith II 1644 H--- L10 W18 1.5

9 Daniel Herman 2107 H--- W6 U--- 1.5

10 Sara Herman 1942 H--- W8 U--- 1.5

11 Mark McGough 1804 W13 L4 L2 1.0

12 Joseph Reininger 1193 L2 W19 L5 1.0

13 Joey Arispe 1123 L11 W14 L6 1.0

14 Ayush Pan Vispute 1209 L16 L13 W19 1.0

15 Dean W Brown 1422 W19 L3 U--- 1.0

16 Peter Barlay 1925 W14 U--- U--- 1.0

17 Shirley Herman 1115 U--- W18 U--- 1.0

18 Clinton D Eads 1250 L1 L17 L8 0.0

19 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L15 L12 L14 0.0

20 Grayson Ed Harris 1002 L7 L5 U--- 0.0


Projected prizes: 1st $44.00; 2nd $29.00; U1800 $19.00; U1205 $13.00

The Threat Is Stronger Than The Execution

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 20, 2018 at 4:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's March Swiss 90.  The event is a month-long tournament with one game per night.  The club officers have scheduled eight of these types of events in the second and third month of each quarter.  In the first month of each quarter, the club holds special events.  January is Speed Chess.  April and July are Quick-rated and Dual rated.  Finally, October is the City Chess Championship, which will be in its 54th year.


The new schedule has stabilized attendance.  We don't seem to have the wild swings in numbers we used to have.  However, last week was an exception.  But a good one.  For the first time in several years, the Colorado Springs Chess Club had to use three pages for the wall chart.  That means we had over 20 players in the monthly event!


With so many games going on last week, my usual job of going over all the games is getting a little more time consuming.  However, it gives me a lot of choices for the Game Of The Week.


I found one I liked from Joey Arispe vs Ayush Vispute.  When I entered the game into my computer, I was surprised that a Knight was hanging for so long.  Sometimes when you enter a game into the computer, you guess at the moves rather than read them from the score sheet because the moves look so automatic.  When you go back to reading the moves you realize that the game you entered makes no sense since the players didn't play the automatic moves.


It turns out the Knight is not an automatic capture.  There is a better threat.


There is a story about Aron Nimzowitsch that when an opponent laid an unlit cigar on the table, he complained to the tournament arbiters, "He is threatening to smoke, and as an old player you must know that the threat is stronger than the execution."


White to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204942245


The Threat Is Stronger Than The Execution

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112299

 

[Event "March Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2018.03.13"]

[Round "2.7"]

[White "Vispute, Ayush"]

[Black "Arispe, Joey"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B22"]

[WhiteElo "1209"]

[BlackElo "1123"]

[PlyCount "126"]

[EventDate "2018.03.06"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

 

1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. cxd4 e6 5. Nf3

Nf6 6. Nc3 d5 7. e5 Nd7 8. Bd3 Be7 9. O-O O-O 10. Qc2 h6 11. a3 b6 12. b4 f6

13. Nxd5 exd5 14. Qxc6 Rb8 15. Qxd5+ Kh8 16. e6 Rb7 17. Ba6 Rc7 18. Bxc8 Qxc8

19. exd7 Rxd7 20. Qe6 g5 21. d5 Kg7 22. Rd1 Bd6 23. Nd4 Be5 24. Nf5+ Kh7 25.

Rb1 Re8 26. Nd6 Rxd6 27. Qf7+ Kh8 28. Qxa7 Bd4 29. Bxg5 Qc2 30. Rbc1 Qxf2+ 31.

Kh1 hxg5 32. Qc7 Be5 33. Qf7 Rdd8 34. Qh5+ Kg7 35. d6 Bxd6 36. Rf1 Qh4 37. Qxh4

gxh4 38. Rc6 Be5 39. Rxb6 Rd2 40. Rb7+ Kg6 41. a4 Rb8 42. Rxb8 Bxb8 43. a5 Rb2

44. a6 Rxb4 45. Ra1 Ba7 46. g3 hxg3 47. hxg3 Kg5 48. Kg2 Kg4 49. Ra2 f5 50. Ra1

Rb2+ 51. Kf1 Kxg3 52. Ra3+ Kg4 53. Ke1 f4 54. Kf1 f3 55. Ra1 Rh2 56. Ra4+ Kg3

57. Rg4+ Kxg4 58. Ke1 Kf4 59. Kd1 Ke3 60. Kc1 Kd3 61. Kb1 Kc3 62. Ka1 Kb3 63.

Kb1 Rh1# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On March 13th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Brian Jo Rountree 1854 W9 W8 2.0

2 Calvin P Dejong 1837 W11 D3 1.5

3 Paul D Anderson 2045 W18 D2 1.5

4 Josh S Bloomer 2353 H--- W10 1.5

5 Daniel Herman 2107 H--- W15 1.5

6 Sara Herman 1942 H--- W16 1.5

7 Michael St Filppu 1654 W19 H--- 1.5

8 Mark McGough 1804 W12 L1 1.0

9 Scott Ch Williams 1203 L1 W19 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1422 W21 L4 1.0

11 Joseph Reininger 1193 L2 W21 1.0

12 Joey Arispe 1123 L8 W20 1.0

13 Peter Barlay 1925 W20 U--- 1.0

14 Shirley Herman 1115 U--- W18 1.0

15 Edward D Boldt 1836 H--- L5 0.5

16 Michael Smith II 1644 H--- L6 0.5

17 Austin Cl Harbach 1576 H--- U--- 0.5

18 Clinton D Eads 1250 L3 L14 0.0

19 Grayson Ed Harris 1002 L7 L9 0.0

20 Ayush Pan Vispute 1209 L13 L12 0.0

21 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L10 L11 0.0

I Get By With A Little Help From My Opponents

Posted by Paul Anderson on March 12, 2018 at 8:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Speed King II

Monday, March 12th, 2018


I am back for another season of chess news and games.  Last year, I suffered another down year rating-wise.   This makes two down years in a row.  I haven't had two down years in a row since 1999 and 2000. 


However, last year was not all bad news.


I had two upsets, including setting a new mark for my highest rated victim (2294).  In addition, I collected my highest pay day from chess as a tournament director at the Colorado Senior Chess Championship.  And finally, I regained my crown as Speed King by winning the Colorado Springs City Speed Chess Championship




Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my 59th upset.  One more upset and I could write my own version of My 60 Memorable Games.


Of course, just because I classify it as an upset doesn't mean it is memorable.  It just means that I won a game against an opponent who was within 25 (or higher) rating points of me when we played.  Since I have so few of these upsets, I enjoy them no matter how they fall into my lap.


This one was a gift. 


I didn't have to make a daring sacrifice to expose the King.  I didn't have to calculate a long, tactical combination to win material.  I didn't have to grind out a drawn endgame in time pressure.  I just had to wait.


Sometimes winning at chess is like giving your opponent rope.  Eventually, he has enough rope to hang himself.


You need not play well - just help your opponent to play badly.

Genrikh Chepukaitis (FIDE 2420)


I don't how many of my upsets were gifts, but like it is said, "Don't look a gift-horse in the mouth."  Well, that is unless you need a game to publish for the start of a new year of newsletters.  Then go ahead and stare right at the bad teeth.


I was examining this set of choppers when my opponent resigned from the tooth ache.  So, I never played the winning move.  See if you can find the root-canal move. 


Black to move


You can view the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204922013


I Get By With A Little Help From My Opponent

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=112262


[Event "November Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.11.21"]

[Round "3.2"]

[White "Buchanan, Buck"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "E62"]

[WhiteElo "2009"]

[BlackElo "2029"]

[PlyCount "57"]

[EventDate "2017.11.07"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 c6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Nf3 d6 5. g3 Nf6

6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O Na6 8. e4 c5 9. d5 Bd7 10. Re1 Ng4 11. Bf4 f6 12. Qd2 g5 13.

Be3 Nxe3 14. Qxe3 h6 15. a3 Qe8 16. Nd2 Nc7 17. b4 b6 18. Rab1 Na6 19. Kh1 f5

20. f4 gxf4 21. gxf4 Bd4 22. Qg3+ Kh7 23. Ne2 Rg8 24. Qf3 Bf6 25. Ng3 Qg6 26.

e5 Bh4 27. exd6 exd6 28. b5 Nc7 29. Re7+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On March 6th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started its March Swiss 90 (4SS, G90+30).


Standings. March Swiss 90

# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2045 W9 1.0

2 Peter Barlay 1925 W10 1.0

3 Brian Jo Rountree 1854 W11 1.0

4 Calvin P Dejong 1837 W12 1.0

5 Mark McGough 1804 W13 1.0

6 Michael St Filppu 1654 W14 1.0

7 Dean W Brown 1422 W15 1.0

8 Austin Cl Harbach 1576 H--- 0.5

9 Clinton D Eads 1250 L1 0.0

10 Ayush Pan Vispute 1209 L2 0.0

11 Scott Ch Williams 1203 L3 0.0

12 Joseph Reininger 1193 L4 0.0

13 Joey Arispe 1123 L5 0.0

14 Grayson Ed Harris 1002 L6 0.0

15 Lawrence R Osborn 974 L7 0.0

Game Of The Year XIV

Posted by Paul Anderson on September 11, 2017 at 9:05 PM Comments comments (1)

End Of The Season

Wednesday, September 13, 2017


Well, another chess season has come to a close for me.  It is time for me to move on to managing the website for my other hobby (http://spamfootball.webs.com/), but I will return after the football season ends.  Before I go, I wanted to clean up some loose ends.


Of course, you can still send in news items or articles during the off-season, and I will email them along to the subscribers.  Any games I receive will be stored at the Colorado Springs Chess News’ Yahoo! group (https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/cs_chess/info).  You can also join the group to keep receiving chess games all year round.


So, before I finish typing my chess thoughts for another year, I want to thank all the people who sent in games and articles, all the people who took the time to tell me something nice about the newsletter, and all the people who take the time to read this.


Game Of The Year


Usually at this time, I look over the past year's statistics to see if it was a good or bad year for me.  Looking over the statistics helps me get past the bad feelings that linger from my losses.  They bring me back into balance and force me to look at what I did right and what I did wrong.  While 2016 was an off year and 2017 isn't looking much better, I still have time to improve 2017.  Here is how it is going so far:


2048 peak USCF rating (record: 2015 - 2102)

2067 peak BLITZ rating (record: 2017 - 2067)

2054 peak CLUB rating (record: 2013 - 2127)

75.81% USCF winning percentage (record: 2012 - 79.31%)

78.95% CLUB winning percentage (record: 2013 - 87.86%)

12 projected prizes won (record: 2014 - 20)

35 projected USCF-rated wins (record: 2013 - 75.5)

1 upset (record: 2001 - 6)


Peak Rating Report


Year, Peak Rating, Gain


1998 1680 +

1999 1580 -

2000 1567 -

2001 1695 +

2002 1757 +

2003 1772 +

2004 1805 +

2005 1864 +

2006 1882 +

2007 1897 +

2008 1962 +

2009 2003 +

2010 1977 -

2011 2000 +

2012 2043 +

2013 2058 +

2014 2098 +

2015 2102 +

2016 2053 -

2017 2048 ?


Total: 15 positive years and 4 negative years


So, as far as my favorite game of the year goes, the obvious choice would be the one upset I had this year.  I was able to get a win from NM Josh Bloomer during the "Year of Josh." 


Josh had been playing less and less chess recently.  In fact, for 5 straight years he played less than 20 games.  Finally, several of Colorado's masters got together for a bet to see which 2200 could pass 2300 first.  This goal seemed to reinvigorate Josh's game.


At the beginning of this year, Josh was getting close to winning the bet.  He was at 2294 and only six points away from the top of the mountain.  However, that is when I got my upset.  He is the highest rated player I have beaten.  It was a setback for Josh but only temporarily.


In the past year, Josh has not only passed the 2300 barrier but also only lost this game and one more to fellow NM, Chris Peterson, in the process.  Chris was one of the masters in 2300 bet and took Josh out for his steak dinner.  But the real thanks goes to LM Brian Wall, who served up the steak dinner on a silver platter.


NM Josh Bloomer's Top 30 Regular Opponents - Last 12 Months


+ = - Name

0 0 1 PAUL D ANDERSON 

0 0 1 CHRISTOFER PETERSON 

0 1 0 CALVIN P DEJONG 

0 1 0 RYAN DAVID SWERDLIN 

0 1 0 LIOR LAPID 

0 1 0 CLIFTON P FORD 

0 1 0 GUNNAR JAMES ANDERSEN 

1 1 0 ALEKSANDR BOZHENOV 

1 0 0 JESSE WILLIAMS 

1 0 0 MATTHEW C HANSEN 

1 0 0 DEREK ESKELDSON 

1 0 0 ALEXANDER FREEMAN 

1 0 0 MICHAEL W SANDAU 

1 0 0 EARLE P WIKLE 

1 0 0 KEVIN LUCAS 

1 0 0 DEAN W BROWN 

2 0 0 DANIEL HERMAN 

2 0 0 SARA HERMAN 

2 0 0 M PAUL COVINGTON 

2 0 0 MARK MCGOUGH 

4 0 0 BRIAN JOHN ROUNTREE 

6 0 0 BRIAN D WALL 


Here is the key position from my game with Josh.


Black to move


See diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204424778


Game Of The Year XIV

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=111256


[Event "February Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.02.28"]

[Round "5.1"]

[White "Bloomer, Josh"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B06"]

[WhiteElo "2275"]

[BlackElo "2041"]

[PlyCount "120"]

[EventDate "2017.01.31"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. h3 d6 5. Bc4 Nf6

6. e5 dxe5 7. Nxe5 O-O 8. O-O Nbd7 9. Nf3 b5 10. Bd3 Bb7 11. Nbd2 a6 12. Nb3

Qc7 13. a4 Nd5 14. Re1 e6 15. c3 N5b6 16. a5 Nd5 17. Bg5 c5 18. dxc5 Nxc5 19.

Nxc5 Qxc5 20. Qe2 Nxc3 21. Qe3 Qxe3 22. Rxe3 Na4 23. Rc1 Rac8 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25.

b3 Nb2 26. Be2 Rc3 27. Nd2 Bd4 28. Rxc3 Bxc3 29. Nf3 Bd5 30. Nd2 Bxa5 31. Bf3

Bxd2 32. Bxd2 Bxf3 33. gxf3 Nd3 34. Kf1 Nc5 35. b4 Nd7 36. Ke2 Kf8 37. Kd3 Ke7

38. Kd4 Kd6 39. Bh6 e5+ 40. Kd3 Kd5 41. Be3 f5 42. Ba7 Nf8 43. h4 Ne6 44. Bb6

h5 45. Be3 f4 46. Bb6 g5 47. hxg5 Nxg5 48. Ke2 Ne6 49. Kf1 Kc4 50. Ba5 Nd4 51.

Bc7 Nxf3 52. Kg2 Ne1+ 53. Kf1 Nd3 54. Ke2 e4 55. f3 e3 56. Bd6 Kd4 57. Be7 Ne5

58. Bf6 Kd5 59. Bg5 Ng6 60. Bf6 Kc4 0-1


This Week In Chess


On August 29th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club finished the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30, $10 entry).


Standings. as90: August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Rd 5 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2001 W7 W3 W2 W4 W6 5.0 $27.00 1st

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1856 W13 W8 L1 W3 L4 3.0 $11.00 2nd + GOW

3 Michael Smith II 1573 W14 L1 W6 L2 W10 3.0 $6.00 2nd

4 Calvin P Dejong 1876 H--- H--- W7 L1 W2 3.0 $11.00 2nd + GOW

5 Mark McGough 1876 W15 H--- L8 W10 U--- 2.5

6 Clinton D Eads 1229 L11 W14 L3 W9 L1 2.0 $6.00 U1300

7 Derek Eskeldson 1270 L1 W15 L4 W14 U--- 2.0 $11.00 U1300 + GOW

8 Aleksand Bozhenov 1994 W9 L2 W5 U--- U--- 2.0

9 Scott Ch Williams 1233 L8 L12 W14 L6 U--- 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1494 H--- H--- U--- L5 L3 1.0

11 Peter Barlay 1912 W6 U--- U--- U--- U--- 1.0

12 William Leo Wolf 1322 U--- W9 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

13 Brian Henry Baum 643 L2 H--- U--- U--- U--- 0.5

14 Douglas N Clark 159 L3 L6 L9 L7 U--- 0.0

15 Daniel J Rupp 989 L5 L7 U--- U--- U--- 0.0


Pikes Peak Open Standings

By Buck Buchanan


5.0 Zachary Bekkedahl

4.5 Dean Clow

4.0 Gunnar Andersen

4.0 Rhett Langseth

4.0 Joshua Samuel

4.0 Mark Krowczyk

4.0 David Hickman

3.5 Sara Herman

3.5 Paul Baxter

3.5 Sullivan McConnell

3.5 Charles Alexander

3.5 Brian Wall

3.5 Daniel Ruvins

3.0 Daniel Herman

3.0 Suhaas Narayanan

3.0 Robert Carlson

3.0 Cory Kohler

3.0 Alexander Marsh

3.0 Edward Sedillo

3.0 Brian Rountree

3.0 Griffin McConnell

3.0 Vibi Varghese

3.0 Davin Yin

3.0 Rahul Sampangiramiah

2.5 Sami Al - Adsani

2.5 Cory Foster

2.5 Nathaniel Reeves

2.5 Michael Smith

2.5 Mukund Gurumurthi

2.5 Scott Williams

2.5 Karthik Selva

2.0 Neil Bhavikatti

2.0 Duwayne Langseth

2.0 Ryan Mantey

2.0 Alexander Freeman

2.0 Calvin Dejong

2.0 Doyle Lobaugh

2.0 Andrew Starr

2.0 Vedanth Sampath

2.0 Shirley Herman

2.0 Nicholas Derosier

2.0 Steven Butcher

2.0 Rollin Leavitt

2.0 Coleman Hoyt

1.5 Alan Wong

1.5 Zane Youssef

1.5 William Wolf

1.5 Christophe Motley

1.5 Alex Firth

1.5 Aditya Krishna

1.5 Aravin Gurumurthi

1.0 Joseph Aragon

1.0 Steven Readel

1.0 Landon Baxter

0.5 Daniel Rupp

0.5 Tucker Lane

0.5 Yusuf Sherif


Pikes Peak Open Games in PGN

By Buck Buchanan


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Zach Bekkedahl"]

[Black "Michael Smith"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B13"]

[WhiteElo "2139"]

[BlackElo "1573"]

[PlyCount "61"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. c3 Bg4 6. Qb3 Qc7 7. Ne2 Bxe2 8.

Bxe2 Nbd7 9. g3 b6 10. Bf4 Qb7 11. O-O h6 12. Qa4 a6 13. Nd2 g5 14. Be5 b5 15.

Qb3 Nxe5 16. dxe5 Nd7 17. c4 Nc5 18. Qe3 e6 19. b4 Nd7 20. cxd5 exd5 21. e6 Nf6

22. Qe5 Bg7 23. Rac1 Rc8 24. Bg4 Rxc1 25. exf7+ Kxf7 26. Qe6+ Kf8 27. Rxc1 Qe7

28. Rc8+ Ne8 29. Qf5+ Bf6 30. Bh5 Qe1+ 31. Kg2 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Dean Clow"]

[Black "Alexander Marsh"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A03"]

[WhiteElo "2064"]

[BlackElo "1551"]

[PlyCount "107"]


1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 c5 3. b3 Nc6 4. Bb2 Nf6 5. e3 b6 6. Bb5 Bb7 7. Ne5 Rc8 8. O-O

a6 9. Nxc6 Bxc6 10. Bxa6 Ra8 11. Be2 g6 12. Nc3 Bg7 13. Nb5 O-O 14. a4 Ne4 15.

Bxg7 Kxg7 16. Qe1 d4 17. Rd1 Nd6 18. exd4 Nxb5 19. axb5 Qxd4+ 20. Qf2 Qxf2+ 21.

Kxf2 Be4 22. d3 Bf5 23. Ra1 Kf6 24. Bf3 Rxa1 25. Rxa1 e5 26. Ra6 Rb8 27. fxe5+

Kxe5 28. Ke3 h5 29. c4 Bc8 30. Ra7 Be6 31. b4 cxb4 32. d4+ Kd6 33. d5 Bf5 34.

Kd4 Bd7 35. Bd1 f6 36. Ra6 Kc7 37. Bf3 Re8 38. d6+ Kxd6 39. Rxb6+ Ke7 40. Rb7

Rd8 41. Bc6 g5 42. c5 f5 43. Kc4 Ke6 44. Bxd7+ Rxd7 45. Rxd7 Kxd7 46. Kxb4 h4

47. Kc3 g4 48. Kd3 f4 49. Ke4 f3 50. Ke3 g3 51. hxg3 fxg2 52. Kf2 h3 53. Kg1

Kc7 54. g4 {and White won.} 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Vedanth Sampath"]

[Black "Daniel Herman"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1508"]

[BlackElo "2057"]

[PlyCount "94"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. f4 g6 4. Bc4 Bg7 5. Nf3 e6 6. O-O Nge7 7. Qe1 O-O 8. d3

d5 9. Bb3 c4 10. dxc4 dxe4 11. Nxe4 b6 12. Qh4 Nf5 13. Qxd8 Rxd8 14. c3 Bb7 15.

Bc2 Ba6 16. b3 Nb4 17. cxb4 Bxa1 18. Ne5 Bb7 19. Nf6+ Kg7 20. Be4 Bxe4 21. Nxe4

f6 22. Nc6 Rdc8 23. b5 Nd4 24. Nd6 Rc7 25. Nb4 Ne2+ 26. Kh1 Nxc1 27. Rxc1 Bd4

28. Rd1 Bc5 29. Na6 Re7 30. Nxc5 bxc5 31. Ne4 Rc8 32. Rd6 e5 33. Rxf6 exf4 34.

Rxf4 Rce8 35. Ng3 Re1+ 36. Nf1 Rf8 37. Rxf8 Kxf8 38. Kg1 Re2 39. a4 Rb2 40. Ng3

Rxb3 41. Ne4 Rb4 42. Nxc5 Rxc4 43. Nd7+ Ke7 44. Ne5 Rxa4 45. Nc6+ Kd6 46. Kf2

Kc5 47. Ne7 Kxb5 {and Black won.} 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "DuWayne Langseth"]

[Black "Ryan Mantey"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "1938"]

[BlackElo "1361"]

[PlyCount "61"]


1. d4 d5 2. e3 e6 3. f4 c5 4. c3 Nc6 5. Bd3 g6 6. Nf3 b6 7. O-O Bg7 8. Nbd2 Nf6

9. Ne5 Nxe5 10. fxe5 Nd7 11. Nf3 a5 12. Qe2 a4 13. e4 c4 14. Bc2 b5 15. exd5

exd5 16. e6 Nf6 17. exf7+ Kxf7 18. Ne5+ Kg8 19. Bg5 Qd6 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. Nxg6

hxg6 22. Qe8+ Qf8 23. Qxg6+ Qg7 24. Rxf6 Qxg6 25. Rxg6+ Kf7 26. Rf1+ Ke7 27.

Rg7+ Ke6 28. Rff7 Rb8 29. Bf5+ Kd6 30. Rg6+ Be6 31. Rxe6# 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "1"]

[White "Mark Krowczyk"]

[Black "Christopher Motley"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "E92"]

[WhiteElo "1974"]

[BlackElo "1211"]

[PlyCount "66"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. Be3 Ng4 8. Bg5

f6 9. Bh4 h5 10. h3 Nh6 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Qxd8 Rxd8 13. Nd5 g5 14. Nxg5 fxg5

15. Bxg5 Rd7 16. Bxh6 Bxh6 17. Nf6+ Kg7 18. Nxd7 Nxd7 19. Bxh5 Nc5 20. O-O Nxe4

21. Rfe1 Nd2 22. Rxe5 Kf6 23. Re8 Nxc4 24. Rd1 Nd6 25. Rxd6+ cxd6 26. Bg4 Bxg4

27. Rxa8 Be2 28. Rxa7 Ba6 29. b4 Bc4 30. Rxb7 Bxa2 31. b5 Bd5 32. Rd7 Ke6 33.

Rh7 Bg5 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Brian Wall"]

[Black "Sullivan McConnell"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "C33"]

[WhiteElo "2265"]

[BlackElo "1922"]

[PlyCount "118"]


1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nc3 Qh4+ 4. Ke2 Nc6 5. Nf3 Qf6 6. Nd5 Qd8 7. d4 d6 8.

Bxf4 Nf6 9. Nc3 a6 10. Kf2 Be7 11. Bd3 g5 12. Bg3 g4 13. d5 gxf3 14. dxc6 fxg2

15. Kxg2 bxc6 16. Rf1 Ng4 17. Qe2 Bg5 18. Kh1 h5 19. e5 d5 20. Rae1 Be6 21.

Bxa6 Rb8 22. Bd3 Ne3 23. Rf6 Rxb2 24. Na4 Rxa2 25. Rxe6+ fxe6 26. Bg6+ Ke7 27.

Nc3 Qg8 28. Bd3 Ra3 29. Nb1 Ra1 30. Rg1 Qb8 31. c3 Ng4 32. h3 Nh6 33. Qxh5 Nf7

34. Qg4 Qg8 35. c4 Ra2 36. cxd5 cxd5 37. Nc3 Rb2 38. Na4 Rb8 39. Nc5 Nd8 40.

Bf2 Rb2 41. Bd4 {Diagram [#]} Be3 42. Qg7+ Qxg7 43. Rxg7+ Kf8 44. Bxb2 Kxg7 45.

Nd7 Rxh3+ 46. Kg2 Rh7 47. Kf3 Ba7 48. Ba3 Rh3+ 49. Ke2 Nb7 50. Be7 Kf7 51. Bf6

Rxd3 52. Kxd3 Nc5+ 53. Nxc5 Bxc5 54. Bd8 Bb6 55. Bh4 c5 56. Kc3 Kg6 57. Kb3 Kf5

58. Ka4 c4 59. Kb5 Bd4 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Rhett Langseth"]

[Black "Calvin DeJong"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A46"]

[WhiteElo "2076"]

[BlackElo "1876"]

[PlyCount "95"]


1. Nf3 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. d4 cxd4 4. cxd4 d6 5. Qc2 Nc6 6. Bf4 g6 7. Nc3 Qb6 8. a3

Bf5 9. e4 Bxe4 10. Nxe4 d5 11. Bd3 dxe4 12. Bxe4 Nxe4 13. Qxe4 Bg7 14. O-O-O

O-O 15. Rd2 Na5 16. Rc2 Nb3+ 17. Kb1 Nxd4 18. Nxd4 Qxd4 19. Qxd4 Bxd4 20. Re1

e6 21. Rc7 b6 22. Rec1 Bxf2 23. Bh6 Rfd8 24. Rf1 Bd4 25. Rfxf7 Be5 26. Rce7 Re8

27. Rxe8+ Rxe8 28. Rxa7 Bd4 29. Kc2 e5 30. Rg7+ Kh8 31. Rd7 Bg1 32. h3 e4 33.

Kd2 Bc5 34. Be3 Rc8 35. Bxc5 Rxc5 36. Ke3 Rc2 37. Rd2 Rc4 38. Kf4 Kg7 39. Re2

e3+ 40. Kxe3 b5 41. Kd3 Rc1 42. Rc2 Rf1 43. Kc3 Kf6 44. Kb4 Rf5 45. Rc6+ Kg7

46. g4 Rf2 47. b3 Rf3 48. Rc3 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Cory Kohler"]

[Black "Dean Clow"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D12"]

[WhiteElo "1847"]

[BlackElo "2064"]

[PlyCount "116"]


1. d4 d5 2. e3 Bf5 3. c4 c6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Nf3 Nf6 6. Bd3 Bg4 7. O-O Bd6 8. h3

Bh5 9. Be2 Nbd7 10. Qb3 Rb8 11. c5 Bc7 12. Qa4 a6 13. Qc2 O-O 14. b4 Bg6 15.

Bd3 e5 16. Bxg6 hxg6 17. dxe5 Nxe5 18. Nd4 Re8 19. a4 Qe7 20. Re1 a5 21. Na2

Nc4 22. Bd2 Ne4 23. Bc3 Nxc3 24. Qxc3 axb4 25. Nxb4 Qxc5 26. Nd3 Qd6 27. Red1

Qh2+ 28. Kf1 Qh1+ 29. Ke2 Qxg2 30. Nc2 Qxh3 31. Qd4 Re4 32. Qa7 Rbe8 33. Rh1

Qg4+ 34. f3 Qg2+ 35. Nf2 Bb6 36. fxe4 Bxa7 37. Rag1 Qxh1 38. Rxh1 dxe4 39. Rd1

Nb6 40. a5 Nd5 41. Ra1 f5 42. a6 bxa6 43. Rxa6 Bb6 44. Nd1 g5 45. Nb2 f4 46.

Nc4 f3+ 47. Kf2 Bc7 48. Rxc6 g4 49. Rg6 g3+ 50. Kf1 Rb8 51. Nd2 Nf6 52. Nd4 Ra8

53. N2b3 Kf7 54. Rg5 g2+ 55. Kg1 Bh2+ 56. Kxh2 Rh8+ 57. Kg1 Rh1+ 58. Kf2 Rf1+

0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Edward Sedillo"]

[Black "Suhaas Nurayanan"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B25"]

[WhiteElo "1806"]

[BlackElo "2046"]

[PlyCount "40"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. g3 Nc6 5. Bg2 Nf6 6. d3 O-O 7. O-O d6 8. Kh1

Rb8 9. Ne2 b5 10. Nh4 Bb7 11. f4 e6 12. f5 exf5 13. exf5 Ne5 14. d4 Bxg2+ 15.

Kxg2 Nc6 16. Be3 Qe7 17. Bg1 Rfe8 18. Re1 Qe4+ 19. Kh3 g5 20. Ng2 Qg4# 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Michael Smith"]

[Black "Will Wolf"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B04"]

[WhiteElo "1573"]

[BlackElo "1322"]

[PlyCount "43"]


1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. Nf3 g6 6. d5 Bg7 7. e6 fxe6 8. dxe6

Bxe6 9. Ng5 Qd7 10. Nxe6 Qxe6+ 11. Be2 Nc6 12. Nc3 Nd4 13. O-O Nxe2+ 14. Nxe2

Qxc4 15. Nc3 O-O 16. Bg5 e5 17. Rc1 Qd4 18. Qc2 Qg4 19. Be3 Nc4 20. Qb3 Kh8 21.

f3 Qe6 22. Nb5 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "2"]

[White "Alexander Marsh"]

[Black "Scott Williams"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D02"]

[WhiteElo "1551"]

[BlackElo "1233"]

[PlyCount "97"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 d5 3. e3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. c3 O-O 6. Bd3 Nbd7 7. Nbd2 Nh5 8.

Bg3 Nhf6 9. Ne5 Nxe5 10. Bxe5 c6 11. Nb3 b6 12. O-O Be6 13. Qe2 Qd7 14. a4 Ng4

15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16. f3 Nh6 17. a5 Nf5 18. axb6 axb6 19. Bc2 h5 20. e4 Nd6 21. e5

Nf5 22. Ra6 Rxa6 23. Qxa6 Ne3 24. Rc1 Nc4 25. Na1 Bf5 26. b3 Bxc2 27. Nxc2 Na5

28. Qxb6 Nb7 29. Ra1 Qf5 30. Qxb7 Qxc2 31. Qxc6 Qe2 32. h3 h4 33. Qxd5 Qe3+ 34.

Kh1 Qxc3 35. Rg1 Qe3 36. Qd7 e6 37. d5 Qxe5 38. dxe6 Qxe6 39. Qxe6 fxe6 40. Rc1

Kf6 41. Kg1 Kf5 42. Kf2 e5 43. Ke3 Re8 44. Rc4 g5 45. b4 Re6 46. b5 Re7 47. b6

Re6 48. Rb4 Re8 49. b7 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Gunnar Andersen"]

[Black "Paul Baxter"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "C91"]

[WhiteElo "2291"]

[BlackElo "1992"]

[PlyCount "57"]


1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3

O-O 9. d4 Bg4 10. Be3 exd4 11. cxd4 Na5 12. Bc2 Nc4 13. Bc1 c5 14. b3 Nb6 15.

dxc5 dxc5 16. Nbd2 Qc7 17. Qe2 Rfe8 18. e5 Nfd5 19. Bxh7+ Kxh7 20. Qe4+ Kg8 21.

Qxg4 Qd7 22. Qg3 Nc3 23. Bb2 Qd3 24. Bxc3 Qxc3 25. Ne4 Qb4 26. Nf6+ Bxf6 27.

exf6 Rxe1+ 28. Rxe1 g6 29. Qc7 1-0


[Event "2017 PikesPk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Zach Bekkedahl"]

[Black "Sara Herman"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B51"]

[WhiteElo "2139"]

[BlackElo "1945"]

[PlyCount "71"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. c3 Ngf6 5. d3 a6 6. Ba4 g6 7. Bb3 e6 8. O-O

Bg7 9. Re1 O-O 10. Bg5 Qc7 11. d4 b5 12. Nbd2 Bb7 13. Rc1 e5 14. d5 c4 15. Bc2

a5 16. Nf1 Nc5 17. Qd2 Nh5 18. g4 Qd7 19. gxh5 Qg4+ 20. Ng3 Qxf3 21. h3 Bf6 22.

Bh6 Bg7 23. Bxg7 Kxg7 24. Nf5+ Kf6 25. Nxd6 Qxh3 26. Re3 Qxh5 27. Rg3 Ra6 28.

Bd1 Qh4 29. Rg4 Qxg4+ 30. Bxg4 Rxd6 31. Qh6 Rh8 32. f4 Nd3 33. Rf1 Nxf4 34.

Rxf4+ exf4 35. Qxf4+ Ke7 36. Qe5+ 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Suhaas Narayanan"]

[Black "Charles Alexander"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A57"]

[WhiteElo "2046"]

[BlackElo "1800"]

[PlyCount "61"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 b5 4. cxb5 a6 5. b6 d6 6. Nc3 Qxb6 7. e4 Nbd7 8. Nf3

g6 9. Bd3 Bg7 10. h3 O-O 11. O-O Ne8 12. Qe2 Nc7 13. Bf4 Bb7 14. Rab1 Rfb8 15.

Nd2 Ne5 16. Bxe5 Bxe5 17. Nc4 Qa7 18. Nxe5 dxe5 19. Bc4 Ne8 20. f4 exf4 21.

Rxf4 Nd6 22. e5 Nxc4 23. Qxc4 Bc8 24. a3 Rb7 25. e6 fxe6 26. Rbf1 Bd7 27. Rf7

Bb5 28. Qh4 h5 29. Qg5 Bd3 30. Qh6 c4+ 31. Kh1 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Shirley Herman"]

[Black "Robert Carlson"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D35"]

[WhiteElo "1042"]

[BlackElo "1620"]

[PlyCount "120"]

 

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Bf5 5. Bg5 e6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. cxd5 exd5 8.

Qa4 Bd7 9. e4 b5 10. Qb3 Qe7 11. Bd3 b4 12. Ne5 Qd6 13. Ne2 Be6 14. Qc2 Be7 15.

Rc1 O-O 16. Nxc6 Nxc6 17. Qxc6 Rfc8 18. Qxd6 Rxc1+ 19. Nxc1 Bxd6 20. e5 Bc7 21.

O-O Bb6 22. Nb3 Rc8 23. h3 a5 24. Bb5 g6 25. a4 Rc7 26. Bd3 Bd7 27. Nc5 Bxc5

28. dxc5 Rxc5 29. b3 Rc3 30. Bb5 Be6 31. Rb1 Bf5 32. Rb2 Kf8 33. Rd2 Rc5 34.

Bd3 Be6 35. Rc2 Rc3 36. Rxc3 bxc3 37. Kf1 Ke7 38. Ke2 Bf5 39. Bxf5 gxf5 40. f4

h5 41. Kd3 d4 42. g3 f6 43. exf6+ Kxf6 44. Kc2 Ke6 45. b4 Kd5 46. bxa5 Kc4 47.

a6 d3+ 48. Kd1 Kb3 49. a7 Kb2 50. a8=Q c2+ 51. Ke1 c1=Q+ 52. Kf2 Qd2+ 53. Kg1

Qe3+ 54. Kg2 Qe4+ 55. Qxe4 fxe4 56. Kf1 Kc2 57. Kf2 d2 58. Ke3 d1=Q 59. Kxe4

Qd3+ 60. Ke5 Qxg3 0-1


[Event "2017 PikesPk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Sami Al-Adsani"]

[Black "Brian Wall"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A40"]

[WhiteElo "1643"]

[BlackElo "2265"]

[PlyCount "62"]


1. d4 Nc6 2. c4 e5 3. dxe5 f6 4. Nf3 fxe5 5. e4 Nf6 6. Bg5 Bc5 7. Nc3 d6 8. Be2

Be6 9. Nd5 Bxd5 10. exd5 Nd4 11. Nxd4 Bxd4 12. Bh5+ g6 13. Qa4+ Kf7 14. Bxf6

Kxf6 15. Be2 Bxb2 16. Rb1 Bc3+ 17. Kd1 b6 18. Rf1 Kg7 19. Qc6 Rf8 20. Kc2 Bd4

21. f3 Kh8 22. Bd3 Qe7 23. Be4 Rad8 24. a4 a5 25. Rbd1 Rf7 26. Qb5 Qh4 27. Rh1

Rdf8 28. Qb3 Qh6 29. Qd3 Rf4 30. Qd2 Qh5 31. Rb1 Rxe4 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Joshua Samuel"]

[Black "Cory Foster"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B38"]

[WhiteElo "1988"]

[BlackElo "1742"]

[PlyCount "63"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Be3 Bg7 6. c4 Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8.

Be2 d6 9. O-O a6 10. Rc1 Bd7 11. b3 Rc8 12. f3 Qe8 13. Qd2 Nxd4 14. Bxd4 b5 15.

cxb5 axb5 16. Nd5 Nxd5 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Qxd5 Bc6 {Diagram [#]} 19. Bxb5 Bxb5

20. Rxc8 Qxc8 21. Qxb5 Qc2 22. a4 Rc8 23. Qb6 Qb2 24. Kh1 Rc2 25. Rg1 Qc3 26.

b4 Ra2 27. a5 Ra1 28. Rxa1 Qxa1+ 29. Qg1 Qb2 30. Qe1 Qb3 31. Qa1+ Kg8 32. a6

1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "3"]

[White "Brian Rountree"]

[Black "Alan Wong"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B28"]

[WhiteElo "1856"]

[BlackElo "1458"]

[PlyCount "129"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Nde2 Nf6 7. g3 Bc5 8.

Bg2 h6 9. O-O O-O 10. a3 d6 11. Nd5 Bg4 12. h3 Bxe2 13. Qxe2 Nd4 14. Qd1 Nxd5

15. exd5 Nf5 16. Qf3 Nd4 17. Qd1 Re8 18. c3 Nf5 19. Qg4 Qf6 20. Be4 Ne7 21. b4

Bb6 22. Be3 Bc7 23. c4 Rad8 24. Rfd1 b6 25. Rac1 Rc8 26. Kg2 Kh8 27. c5 bxc5

28. bxc5 dxc5 29. Bxc5 Bd6 30. Bb4 Bxb4 31. axb4 Rxc1 32. Rxc1 Qd6 33. Qf3 Rf8

34. Rc5 f5 35. Bd3 Kg8 36. Bc4 e4 37. Qf4 Rd8 38. Qxd6 Rxd6 39. Kf1 Kf8 40. h4

g5 41. hxg5 hxg5 42. Ke2 Rb6 43. b5 axb5 44. Bxb5 Rd6 45. Bc6 Kf7 46. Ke3 Kf6

47. Kd4 g4 48. Bb7 Rd7 49. Rb5 Rd6 50. Ra5 Kg5 51. Ke5 Rb6 52. Ba8 Ng6+ 53. Kd4

Rd6 54. Kc5 Rd8 55. d6 Ne5 56. Kd5 Nd3 57. Ke6 Re8+ 58. Kf7 Rh8 59. d7 Rh7+ 60.

Ke6 Rh8 61. Ke7 Rh7+ 62. Kd6 Rh8 63. Bxe4 Nxf2 64. Rxf5+ Kh6 65. Rxf2 {and

White won.} 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Dean Clow"]

[Black "Gunnar Andersen"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "A47"]

[WhiteElo "2064"]

[BlackElo "2291"]

[PlyCount "99"]

 

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c5 3. c3 e6 4. Bf4 b6 5. e3 Be7 6. h3 O-O 7. Bd3 Ba6 8. O-O

Bxd3 9. Qxd3 d5 10. Nbd2 Nc6 11. Rfe1 c4 12. Qc2 b5 13. Ne5 Nxe5 14. Bxe5 a5

15. e4 Qd7 16. Bxf6 Bxf6 17. Nf3 Rfe8 18. Re2 b4 19. Rae1 Reb8 20. exd5 Qxd5

21. Ne5 b3 22. axb3 cxb3 23. Qd3 a4 24. c4 Qd6 25. Rd1 a3 26. bxa3 Bxe5 27.

Rxe5 Qxa3 28. Re3 Qa2 29. Qb1 Qc2 30. Rc1 {Diagram [#]} Qxc1+ 31. Qxc1 b2 32.

Qb1 Ra1 33. Re1 Rxb1 34. Rxb1 Kf8 35. Kf1 Rb4 36. Ke2 Rxc4 37. Kd3 Rb4 38. Kc3

Rb5 39. Rxb2 Rxb2 40. Kxb2 Ke7 41. Kc3 Kd6 42. Kc4 g5 43. Kd3 Kd5 44. Ke3 f5

45. g3 h5 46. h4 f4+ 47. Kf3 gxh4 48. gxh4 e5 49. dxe5 Kxe5 50. Ke2 1/2-1/2

 

[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Daniel Herman"]

[Black "Zach Bekkedahl"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B27"]

[WhiteElo "2057"]

[BlackElo "2139"]

[PlyCount "84"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Qa4 d6 7. e5 dxe5 8.

Nxe5 Bg7 9. Bb5 O-O 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bxc6 Bd7 12. O-O Bxc6 13. Qxc6 Qb8 14.

Nd5 Nxd5 15. Qxd5 Bxb2 16. Rb1 Qe5 17. Qxe5 Bxe5 18. Rb7 Bd6 19. Bb2 Rfb8 20.

Rxb8+ Rxb8 21. Bd4 Rc8 22. Bxa7 Rxc2 23. Bd4 Rxa2 24. Ra1 Rxa1+ 25. Bxa1 e5 26.

g4 f5 27. gxf5 gxf5 28. Kg2 Kf7 29. Bb2 Ke6 30. f3 Kd5 31. h3 Kc4 32. Kf2 Kd3

33. Bc1 Bc5+ 34. Kf1 Be3 35. Ba3 Bd2 36. Bd6 Bc3 37. Be7 Ke3 38. Kg2 Ke2 39.

Bf6 f4 40. Bd8 e4 41. Bb6 exf3+ 42. Kg1 Bd2 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Rhett Langseth"]

[Black "Suhaas Narayanan"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D02"]

[WhiteElo "2076"]

[BlackElo "2046"]

[PlyCount "141"]


1. Nf3 d5 2. c3 c5 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Qa4 Qc7 6. Bf4 Qb6 7. Qb3 Nf6 8.

Qxb6 axb6 9. Na3 Bf5 10. Nb5 Rc8 11. h3 h6 12. e3 Kd7 13. Nbd4 Nxd4 14. Ne5+

Ke8 15. exd4 Nd7 16. Be2 Nxe5 17. Bxe5 f6 18. Bg3 e6 19. Kd2 Kf7 20. Rhe1 Be7

21. Bb5 Rhd8 22. Re2 Bd6 23. Bxd6 Rxd6 24. Rd1 Ra8 25. a3 h5 26. Re3 Rh8 27.

Bd3 Bxd3 28. Kxd3 b5 29. Kc2 Rc8 30. Kb3 Ra8 31. f4 g6 32. g4 h4 33. f5 Raa6

34. fxg6+ Kxg6 35. Rf3 Ra4 36. Rd2 Rc4 37. Rdf2 e5 38. dxe5 fxe5 39. Rf7 d4 40.

cxd4 Rcxd4 41. Kc2 b4 42. R7f3 bxa3 43. Rxa3 Rc6+ 44. Rc3 Rb6 45. b3 Ra6 46.

Kb2 e4 47. Re3 Rb4 48. Rf4 Rd6 49. Kc3 Rdb6 50. Kb2 Rd6 51. Ka3 Rbb6 52. Rfxe4

Ra6+ 53. Kb2 Rd2+ 54. Kc3 Rdd6 55. Re2 Rf6 56. Kb2 Rab6 57. Re5 Rf3 58. R2e3

Rf2+ 59. Kc3 Rc6+ 60. Kb4 Rf4+ 61. Kb5 Rff6 62. b4 Rb6+ 63. Ka4 Ra6+ 64. Ra5

Rab6 65. Ree5 Rf1 66. Rg5+ Kh6 67. Rh5+ Kg6 68. Rag5+ Kf7 69. Rf5+ Rf6 70. Rxf1

Rxf1 71. Rxh4 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Brian Wall"]

[Black "Nathaniel Reeves"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D00"]

[WhiteElo "2265"]

[BlackElo "1922"]

[PlyCount "47"]


1. e4 Nf6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 dxe4 4. f3 exf3 5. Nxf3 Bg4 6. h3 Bh5 7. g4 Bg6 8.

Ne5 e6 9. Bg2 c6 10. h4 Bb4 11. O-O Bxc2 12. Qxc2 Qxd4+ 13. Kh1 Qxe5 14. Bf4

Qa5 15. g5 Bxc3 16. bxc3 Nd5 17. Bd2 Qc7 18. c4 Ne7 19. Bf4 Qc8 20. Bd6 c5 21.

Qb2 Nbc6 22. Qxg7 Rg8 23. Qxf7+ Kd8 24. Rad1 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "DuWayne Langseth"]

[Black "David Hickman"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A48"]

[WhiteElo "1938"]

[BlackElo "1773"]

[PlyCount "106"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. e3 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Be2 O-O 5. O-O d6 6. b3 Nc6 7. Bb2 Nd7 8. e4

e5 9. d5 Ne7 10. c4 h6 11. Nc3 f5 12. Nd2 c5 13. f3 h5 14. a3 Bh6 15. b4 Be3+

16. Kh1 f4 17. bxc5 Nxc5 18. Nb3 Nxb3 19. Qxb3 g5 20. Nd1 Bc5 21. Nf2 Rf7 22.

Nd3 b6 23. Nxc5 bxc5 24. Bc3 Rg7 25. Qb5 g4 26. Ba5 Qf8 27. Bc7 {Diagram [#]}

Nxd5 28. Bxd6 Qxd6 29. Qe8+ Qf8 30. Qxf8+ Kxf8 31. cxd5 Rb8 32. Rab1 Rgb7 33.

Rxb7 Rxb7 34. g3 Rb2 35. Bd1 gxf3 36. Bxf3 Bh3 37. Rc1 Ke7 38. gxf4 Rf2 39.

Bxh5 Rxf4 40. Re1 c4 41. Be2 Rxe4 42. Kg1 Bg4 43. d6+ Kxd6 44. Rd1+ Kc5 45.

Bxg4 Rxg4+ 46. Kf1 c3 47. Ke2 Rd4 48. Rb1 a5 49. Rb8 Kc4 50. Rc8+ Kb3 51. Rc7

c2 52. Rc6 Rd1 53. Rb6+ Kxa3 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "4"]

[White "Karthik Selva"]

[Black "Michael Smith"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D13"]

[WhiteElo "1386"]

[BlackElo "1573"]

[PlyCount "54"]


1. c4 c6 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. g3 d5 4. cxd5 cxd5 5. d4 Bf5 6. Bg2 e6 7. Nf3 Nc6 8. a3

Be7 9. O-O h5 10. Bf4 Qb6 11. b4 Ne4 12. Rc1 h4 13. Nxe4 Bxe4 14. Qa4 Bxf3 15.

Bxf3 g5 16. Bd2 hxg3 17. fxg3 g4 18. Bg2 Qxd4+ 19. Kh1 Kd7 20. Bc3 Rxh2+ 21.

Kxh2 Rh8+ 22. Bh3 Rxh3+ 23. Kg2 Qe4+ 24. Rf3 Qxe2+ 25. Rf2 Qe4+ 26. Rf3 Qxf3+

27. Kg1 Rh1# 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Gunnar Andersen"]

[Black "Brian Wall"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "B00"]

[WhiteElo "2291"]

[BlackElo "2265"]

[PlyCount "118"]


1. e4 Na6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. Nc3 Qd6 5. h3 Bf5 6. Nf3 Nb4 7. Bb5+ c6 8.

Ba4 e6 9. Ne5 Rd8 10. Be3 Nf6 11. O-O h6 12. Ne2 b5 13. Bb3 Nbd5 14. Ng3 Bh7

15. c4 Nxe3 16. fxe3 Be7 17. Qf3 bxc4 18. Bxc4 O-O 19. Qxc6 Nd5 20. Bxd5 Qxd5

21. Qxd5 Rxd5 22. Kf2 Rb8 23. b3 Ba3 24. Nc4 Be7 25. Ke2 a5 26. Rfc1 f6 27. e4

Rdb5 28. Rc3 g5 29. Rd1 f5 30. Ne5 fxe4 31. Nh5 Bd6 32. Nf6+ Kg7 33. Nh5+ Kg8

34. Rdc1 Bxe5 35. dxe5 Bg6 36. Nf6+ Kh8 37. Rc6 a4 38. Rxe6 axb3 39. axb3 Rxb3

40. Nd7 Rb2+ 41. Ke1 Rd8 42. Rxg6 Rxd7 43. Rxh6+ Kg7 44. Rd6 Re7 45. Rd2 Rb5

46. Ke2 Rbxe5 47. Ke3 Ra5 48. Rc3 Ra1 49. Rd5 Kg6 50. Rcc5 Ra3+ 51. Kf2 e3+ 52.

Ke2 Ra2+ 53. Kf3 Rf2+ 54. Kg3 e2 55. Re5 Rff7 56. Rc6+ Kh7 57. Rce6 Rxe6 58.

Rxe6 Rf5 59. Rxe2 Kg6 {The game continued to move 124, when it was drawn.}

1/2-1/2


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Suhaas Narayanan"]

[Black "Dean Clow"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "D35"]

[WhiteElo "2046"]

[BlackElo "2064"]

[PlyCount "78"]


1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 Be7 6. Qc2 O-O 7. Nf3 Be6 8.

e3 Nbd7 9. Be2 c5 10. O-O Rc8 11. Rac1 cxd4 12. Nxd4 Ne4 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. Qd1

Nxc3 15. bxc3 Nb6 16. Qb3 Nc4 17. Rfd1 Rfd8 18. Qb1 Rc5 19. Nb3 Rc6 20. Rd4

Rdc8 21. Bf3 Nb6 22. e4 dxe4 23. Bxe4 Rxc3 24. Rxc3 Rxc3 25. Bxh7+ Kh8 26. Be4

Bxb3 27. axb3 Qc7 28. Rd1 Nd7 29. Qa1 b6 30. Bf5 Nf8 31. b4 Kg8 32. h3 g6 33.

Bg4 a5 34. bxa5 bxa5 35. Qa4 Qc5 36. Qf4 Rc2 37. Bd7 Rc4 38. Qf6 Rc1 39. Qf3 $2

Nxd7 0-1


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "David Hickman"]

[Black "Daniel Herman"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1773"]

[BlackElo "2057"]

[PlyCount "99"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. f4 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bb5 Nd4 6. d3 Nxb5 7. Nxb5 a6 8. Nc3

b5 9. O-O Bb7 10. Qe1 e6 11. f5 Qc7 12. fxe6 dxe6 13. Ng5 Nh6 14. Qh4 Qe7 15.

Bd2 O-O-O 16. Rad1 Rdf8 17. Rde1 Ng8 18. Qg3 h6 19. Nf3 Qd7 20. a3 Ne7 21. b4

cxb4 22. axb4 Qc7 23. e5 Nf5 24. Qf2 g5 25. Ne4 g4 26. Nh4 Bxe5 27. Nxf5 Bxh2+

28. Kh1 exf5 29. Qxf5+ Kb8 30. Nc5 Bc8 31. Qh5 Bg3 32. Bc3 f6 33. Ra1 Qc6 34.

Rf5 Bc7 35. d4 Rhg8 36. d5 Qd6 37. Ne4 Qd7 38. Raf1 Qf7 39. Qxf7 Rxf7 40. Rxf6

Re7 41. Nc5 Re2 42. d6 Bd8 43. Rf8 Rxf8 44. Rxf8 Be7 45. Re8 Rxc2 46. dxe7 g3

47. Rxc8+ Kxc8 48. e8=Q+ Kc7 49. Qd7+ Kb6 50. Qb7# 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Sullivan McConnell"]

[Black "Paul Baxter"]

[Result "1/2-1/2"]

[ECO "B23"]

[WhiteElo "1922"]

[BlackElo "1992"]

[PlyCount "81"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 g6 3. f4 Bg7 4. Nf3 Nc6 5. Bb5 e6 6. Bxc6 bxc6 7. e5 Ne7 8. Ne4

O-O 9. Nxc5 Nd5 10. d4 d6 11. Nd3 f6 12. Qe2 {Diagram [#]} fxe5 13. fxe5 Ba6

14. Bg5 Qd7 15. O-O h6 16. Bd2 Nf4 17. Qe4 d5 18. Qe3 Nxd3 19. cxd3 Qe7 20. a3

Rab8 21. b4 Rf7 22. Rfc1 Bb7 23. Rc5 g5 24. h3 Rf5 25. b5 cxb5 26. Rxb5 Rc8 27.

Bb4 Qd7 28. Rc5 Bf8 29. Rxc8 Bxc8 30. Bxf8 Rxf8 31. h4 g4 32. Nh2 Qg7 33. Qg3

h5 34. Qe3 Ba6 35. Rf1 Rxf1+ 36. Nxf1 Qg6 37. Ng3 Kh7 38. Qf4 Bxd3 39. Qf8 a6

40. Qe7+ Kh6 41. Qf8+ 1/2-1/2


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Daniel Ruvins"]

[Black "Mukund Gurumurthi"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "A47"]

[WhiteElo "1724"]

[BlackElo "1425"]

[PlyCount "91"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bf4 e6 3. e3 b6 4. c3 c5 5. Nd2 Bb7 6. Ngf3 Nc6 7. Bb5 Be7 8. Nc4

a6 9. Bxc6 Bxc6 10. Nd6+ Bxd6 11. Bxd6 Ne4 12. Be5 f6 13. Bg3 Nxg3 14. hxg3 g5

15. Qc2 Qe7 16. g4 d6 17. Qb3 b5 18. Rh6 c4 19. Qc2 Qg7 20. Rh2 O-O-O 21. Nd2

e5 22. a4 Qd7 23. axb5 axb5 24. f3 Rde8 25. Kf2 Qe7 26. Nf1 e4 27. b4 Qf7 28.

Ng3 Qb7 29. Nf5 Rd8 30. Rh3 Rhe8 31. Qe2 exf3 32. gxf3 Rd7 33. Qa2 Kc7 34. Qa5+

Qb6 35. Qa7+ Qxa7 36. Rxa7+ Bb7 37. Rh6 Rf8 38. Ra5 Kc6 39. d5+ Kxd5 40. Rxb5+

Ke6 41. Nd4+ Ke7 42. Rxh7+ Rf7 43. Nf5+ Ke8 44. Rxf7 Kxf7 45. Rxb7 Rxb7 46.

Nxd6+ 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Griffiin McConnell"]

[Black "DuWayne Langseth"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B01"]

[WhiteElo "1804"]

[BlackElo "1938"]

[PlyCount "103"]


1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd6 4. d4 Nf6 5. g3 Bg4 6. Be2 Bf5 7. Bf3 Nc6 8.

Bf4 Qd7 9. Nb5 Rc8 10. c3 Nd5 11. Bc1 Ncb4 12. Na3 Nd3+ 13. Kf1 Nxc1 14. Qxc1

e6 15. Nc2 Be7 16. h4 c5 17. dxc5 Qb5+ 18. Kg2 Bxc5 19. Ne2 O-O 20. Ned4 Qb6

21. Nxf5 Nxc3 22. bxc3 exf5 23. Rb1 Qf6 24. Bxb7 Rb8 25. Bf3 Qxc3 26. Rxb8 Rxb8

27. Qf4 Rb2 28. Bd1 g6 29. h5 Rxa2 30. Qf3 Rxc2 31. Bxc2 Qxc2 32. h6 Qe4 33.

Qxe4 fxe4 34. Rc1 Bf8 35. Rc8 a5 36. Kh3 a4 37. Kh4 f6 38. Kg4 Kf7 39. Rc7+ Be7

40. Ra7 a3 41. Kf4 f5 {Diagram [#]} 42. Ke5 a2 43. Rxa2 Bf6+ 44. Kd5 Bg5 45.

Ra7+ Kg8 46. Ke6 Bxh6 47. Kf6 Bf8 48. Ra8 h5 49. Kxg6 f4 50. gxf4 h4 51. f5 e3

52. f6 $1 1-0


[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White " Sami Al-Adsani"]

[Black "Coleman Hoyt"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "D38"]

[WhiteElo "1643"]

[BlackElo "1047"]

[PlyCount "117"]


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. Bg5 Be6 7. e3 Nbd7 8.

Bd3 c6 9. Qc2 h6 10. Bh4 Bg4 11. h3 Bxf3 12. gxf3 g5 13. Bg3 Qe7 14. a3 Ba5 15.

b4 Bb6 16. Ne2 a5 17. O-O axb4 18. axb4 Rxa1 19. Rxa1 O-O 20. b5 c5 21. dxc5

Bxc5 22. Nc3 d4 23. Na4 Ra8 24. Rd1 dxe3 25. Nxc5 Nxc5 26. fxe3 Qxe3+ 27. Bf2

Qxf3 28. Be2 Qxh3 29. Qxc5 Ng4 30. Qd6 Nxf2 31. Kxf2 Qf5+ 32. Ke1 Re8 33. Qd7

Qxd7 34. Rxd7 Rb8 35. Bf3 b6 36. Bd5 Re8+ 37. Kf2 Re5 38. Bxf7+ Kf8 39. Bc4

Rf5+ 40. Kg2 h5 41. Rd6 Rf4 42. Be2 Rb4 43. Rxb6 Rb2 44. Kf1 Rb1+ 45. Kf2 Rb2

46. Ke3 Rb3+ 47. Kf2 Rb2 48. Rh6 g4 49. Rxh5 g3+ 50. Kf3 Rb3+ 51. Kg2 Rb2 52.

Re5 Rb3 53. Bf3 Rb2+ 54. Kxg3 Rb3 55. Kf4 Rb4+ 56. Kf5 Rb1 57. Bc6 Rf1+ 58. Ke6

Kg7 59. Rf5 1-0

 

[Event "2017 Pikes Pk Open"]

[Site "?"]

[Date "????.??.??"]

[Round "5"]

[White "Scott Williams"]

[Black "Zane Youssef"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "1233"]

[BlackElo "998"]

[PlyCount "59"]


1. e4 d6 2. h3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. Nf3 e5 5. Bc4 Be7 6. d3 c6 7. a3 a5 8. Bg5 h6

9. Be3 Qc7 10. Ba2 Nf8 11. O-O g5 12. d4 Ng6 13. dxe5 dxe5 14. Qd3 O-O 15. Ne2

g4 16. hxg4 Bxg4 17. Nh2 Kh7 18. Nxg4 Nxg4 19. Ng3 Rg8 20. Nf5 h5 21. Bd2 Nf4

22. Bxf4 exf4 23. Qh3 Bf8 24. Qxh5+ Nh6 25. Nxh6 Bxh6 26. Qf5+ Kh8 27. Qf6+ Kh7

28. Bxf7 Rgf8 29. Qg6+ Kh8 30. Qxh6# 1-0

Make It A Combo

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 28, 2017 at 6:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30).  It was the fourth round, and I was facing by best student, Calvin DeJong.  More than any other student of mine, he put into practice the advice I had given him.  So, he had all my secrets in a couple months.  It took me over seven years of testing out different ideas over the board to realize these things.


One of my secrets was the DROP Method of tactics.  It was a way of simplfying the myriad descriptions chess players use to describe tactics.  I remember looking online at lists that contain over thirty different tactics.


When I was a child learning chess, I only remember three:  Pin, Fork, and Skewer.  How could there be so many about which I was not told?  Well, the reason was because most teachers weren't separating the basic tactics from the more advanced problems.


There are four basic kinds of tactics:  Discovery, Removal, Overload, and Pin.


The other tactical ideas players describe come from combinations.  A combination occurs when 2 or more of the basic tactics are needed to realize the material gain.  The more times a basic tactic is needed in a particular line or series of moves to gain the material goal the more difficult the problem becomes.  And this is what makes chess challenging.


Combinations have always been the most intriguing aspect of Chess.  The masters look for them, the public applauds them, the critics praise them.  It is because combinations are possible that Chess is more than a lifeless mathematical exercise.  They are the poetry of the game; they are to Chess what melody is to music.  They represent the triumph of mind over matter.

(Reuben Fine)


So, when both the teacher and student missed a combination, I was interested in discovering why that happened.  The game was still relatively young.  Neither player had made 20 moves and had plenty of time on their clocks.  Therefore, the difficultly in seeing the combination must have come from the nature of the position.


After looking a the position, I realized that it was one of those rare positions that combined all four of the basic tactics.  So, a player has to be familar with the pattern of each of the different kinds of tactics and good at calculating four moves deep.  Clearly, both of us were not up to the task that night.  See if you can do better...


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204382282


Make It A Combo

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=111138


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.08.22"]

[Round "4.1"]

[White "DeJong, Calvin"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B06"]

[WhiteElo "1876"]

[BlackElo "2001"]

[PlyCount "60"]

[EventDate "2017.08.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. d4 c6 2. e4 g6 3. Be3 Bg7 4. c3 d6 5. Bc4 d5

6. exd5 cxd5 7. Bd3 Nc6 8. Nf3 Nf6 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. O-O Ne8 11. Re1 Nd6 12. Bf4

a6 13. Nb3 b6 14. Ne5 Bb7 15. Qe2 Nb8 16. a4 e6 17. a5 b5 18. Nc5 Bc6 19. b3

Be8 20. Nxf7 Bxf7 21. Nxe6 Bxe6 22. Qxe6+ Nf7 23. c4 bxc4 24. bxc4 Qf6 25. Qxd5

Qxf4 26. Qxa8 Bxd4 27. Ra2 Ne5 28. Qd5+ Kh8 29. Kh1 Nxd3 30. Rf1 Nxf2+ 0-1


This Week In Chess


On August 22nd, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Rd 4 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2001 W6 W4 W2 W8 4.0

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1856 W13 W5 L1 W4 3.0 $5.00 GOW

3 Mark McGough 1876 W15 H--- L5 W10 2.5

4 Michael Smith II 1573 W14 L1 W7 L2 2.0

5 Aleksand Bozhenov 1994 W9 L2 W3 U--- 2.0

6 Derek Eskeldson 1270 L1 W15 L8 W14 2.0 $5.00 GOW

7 Clinton D Eads 1229 L11 W14 L4 W9 2.0

8 Calvin P Dejong 1876 H--- H--- W6 L1 2.0

9 Scott Ch Williams 1233 L5 L12 W14 L7 1.0

10 Dean W Brown 1494 H--- H--- U--- L3 1.0

11 Peter Barlay 1912 W7 U--- U--- U--- 1.0

12 William Leo Wolf 1322 U--- W9 U--- U--- 1.0

13 Brian Henry Baum 643 L2 H--- U--- U--- 0.5

14 Douglas N Clark 159 L4 L7 L9 L6 0.0

15 Daniel J Rupp 989 L3 L6 U--- U--- 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $27.00; 2nd $18.00; U1300 $12.00

Everything About You

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 23, 2017 at 3:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from my loss column.  I have a tradition of publishing four losses each year.  I hate looking at a chess loss, let alone publishing it, but forcing myself to do this keeps me humble.


When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom.

Proverbs 11:2 (KJV)


The worse part is that I lost to Mike Smith.


I know what you are thinking, "Hey Paul, isn't that the same guy who dated your sister in high school?  Didn't you hate that guy?"


Well, the good news is that this is Mike Smith part II.  And like most sequels, he is much better than the original.  We have become good friends, and I told him the story about my sister.  He responded:


"Everybody hates Mike Smith!"


I guess this widespread bias against Mike Smith has made him a little bitter.  Every week he comes to the club and tells me all the things he hates.  It is like listening to the song from Ugly Kid Joe, "Everything About You."


"I hate New Mexico!"

"I hate white socks!"

"I hate the Kissing Knights logo!"

"I hate gift cards from Will Wolf!"

"I hate LM Brian Wall's shirt!"


So, I will leave you with this year's chess position I hate the most.


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204367312


Everything About You

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=111107


[Event "April Quick"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.04.18"]

[Round "1.1"]

[White "Smith, Mike"]

[Black "Anderson, Paul"]

[Result "1-0"]

[ECO "B06"]

[WhiteElo "1569"]

[BlackElo "1986"]

[PlyCount "61"]

[EventDate "2017.04.18"]

[TimeControl "1440+5"]


1. e4 c6 2. d4 g6 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. Be3 Bg4

6. h3 Bxf3 7. Qxf3 Nd7 8. Bc4 Ngf6 9. g4 h6 10. h4 e6 11. g5 hxg5 12. hxg5

Rxh1+ 13. Qxh1 Nh5 14. Be2 Qb6 15. O-O-O O-O-O 16. d5 Qb4 17. dxc6 bxc6 18. e5

Nxe5 19. Bd4 Kc7 20. a3 Qa5 21. Bxh5 Rh8 22. Qe4 Rxh5 23. f4 c5 24. fxe5 d5 25.

Nxd5+ Kb8 26. Ne7 Qc7 27. Bxc5 Qxc5 28. Rd8+ Kc7 29. Rc8+ Kd7 30. Qb7+ Qc7 31.

Qxc7# 1-0


This Week In Chess


On August 15th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Rd 3 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2001 W7 W3 W2 3.0

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1856 W12 W4 L1 2.0

3 Michael Smith II 1573 W13 L1 W8 2.0

4 Aleksand Bozhenov 1994 W9 L2 W6 2.0

5 Calvin P Dejong 1876 H--- H--- W7 2.0

6 Mark McGough 1876 W14 H--- L4 1.5

7 Derek Eskeldson 1270 L1 W14 L5 1.0

8 Clinton D Eads 1229 L10 W13 L3 1.0

9 Scott Ch Williams 1233 L4 L11 W13 1.0

10 Peter Barlay 1912 W8 U--- U--- 1.0

11 William Leo Wolf 1322 U--- W9 U--- 1.0

12 Brian Henry Baum 643 L2 H--- U--- 0.5

13 Douglas N Clark 159 L3 L8 L9 0.0

14 Daniel J Rupp 989 L6 L7 U--- 0.0


Projected Prizes: 1st $27.00; 2nd $18.00; U1300 $12.00

Searchin' In The Sun For Another Overload

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 14, 2017 at 7:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game choice comes from Glen Campbell, the pop and country singer who passed away on August 8th from Alzheimer's disease.  In honor of his contributions to music, I was listening to a couple of songs from him that I have in my collection.  My sister and her best friend from the 4th grade, Jennifer Macpherson, performed "Rhinestone Cowboy" at the 1978 Elmwood elementary school carnival entitled, "The Razzle Dazzle Carnival." 


Jennifer was a very witty child and won the name the carnival contest, which included the honors of having her name announced over the loud speaker by Principal Barnicle and various cash and prizes.  However, her vocals left something to be desired, and she failed to win the talent contest despite performing one of the catchiest songs of all time.  After hours and hours of listening to my sister and Jennifer rehearse in our basement, the song remains in my head and in my collection to this day.


The other Glen Campbell song that I have in my collection is "Wichita Lineman."  It was a gift from my sister since it was popular in the year of my birth.  I don't really know what a Lineman does, but it seems to me he has time to play chess during his job.


At one point in the song, the Lineman is "searching in the sun for another Overload."  I can relate to this as I have often had to search through chess games to find an Overload tactic for my newsletter.  In fact, this week I found a position which had 2 Overloads.


See if you can decide which one is better.  And I recommend taking this puzzle out in the sun!


White to move


See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204339026


Searchin' In The Sun For Another Overload

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=111069


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.08.08"]

[Round "2.4"]

[White "Rupp, Dan"]

[Black "Eskeldson, Derek"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "B07"]

[WhiteElo "989"]

[BlackElo "1270"]

[PlyCount "62"]

[EventDate "2017.08.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]

1. e4 d6 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Nc3 g6 5. d4

Bg4 6. d5 Ne5 7. Bb5+ Ned7 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Bg7 10. Bg5 O-O 11. O-O-O Ne5 12.

Qe2 a6 13. Ba4 b5 14. Bb3 Nfd7 15. f4 Nc4 16. a3 Nxa3 17. e5 Nc4 18. exd6 cxd6

19. h4 Qa5 20.

Bxc4 bxc4 21. Bxe7 Rfe8 22. Rhe1 Rab8 23. Qxc4 Rec8 24. b4 Qa3+ 25. Kd2 Rxc4

26. Re3 Rxc3 27. Rde1 Rxe3 28. Rxe3 Qxb4+ 29. c3 Qxf4 30. g3 Rb2+ 31. Kd3 Nc5#

0-1


This Week In Chess


On August 8th, the Colorado Springs Chess Club continued the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Rd 2 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2001 W6 W5 2.0

2 Brian Jo Rountree 1856 W10 W4 2.0

3 Mark McGough 1876 W11 H--- 1.5

4 Aleksand Bozhenov 1994 W12 L2 1.0

5 Michael Smith II 1573 W13 L1 1.0

6 Derek Eskeldson 1270 L1 W11 1.0

7 Clinton D Eads 1229 L8 W13 1.0

8 Peter Barlay 1912 W7 U--- 1.0

9 William Leo Wolf 1322 U--- W12 1.0

10 Brian Henry Baum 643 L2 H--- 0.5

11 Daniel J Rupp 989 L3 L6 0.0

12 Scott Ch Williams 1233 L4 L9 0.0

13 Douglas N Clark 159 L5 L7 0.0

Remove The Attacker

Posted by Paul Anderson on August 7, 2017 at 7:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Game Of The Week


This week's game comes from the Colorado Springs Chess Club's August Swiss 90.  It will be a five round event this month and good preparation for our city championship coming up in October.


A couple of Brians met for the first time.  One is a regular at the club and this time control.  One is new to slow chess.  One has over 1,000 rated chess games under his belt.  One has 4 games in the bank.  One has been playing USCF chess for close to 25 years.  One has just started.


Despite the glaring difference in experience, the newby decided to castle opposite from the veteran.  Chess games where the Kings are located on different sides of the board are often a race to see which player can Pawn Storm the other player's King the fastest.  The veteran won that race.


With open files pointing towards the King and pieces pouring in the holes, the old Brian put the pressure on the new Brian to see how well he could rally his defence. 


While chess tactics are most commonly thought of as offensive weapons, similar ideas can be used as defensive weapons.  A chess player can remove the defender to gain material or get to the King.  However, when too many of your opponent's pieces are assembling around your King, it just might be time to deploy the counter measures.


See if you can find the moves to salvage this position.


White to move



See the diagram and answer here:

http://cschess.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=204316500


Remove The Attacker

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=111016


[Event "August Swiss 90"]

[Site "http://cschess.webs.com/"]

[Date "2017.08.01"]

[Round "1.5"]

[White "Baum, Brian"]

[Black "Rountree, Brian"]

[Result "0-1"]

[ECO "A00"]

[WhiteElo "643"]

[BlackElo "1856"]

[PlyCount "42"]

[EventDate "2017.08.01"]

[TimeControl "5400+30"]


1. e3 e5 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 c6 4. Ne2 Bd6 5. b3 Ne7

6. Bb2 Be6 7. d4 e4 8. Nbc3 O-O 9. Qd2 b5 10. Nf4 Nd7 11. Nxe6 fxe6 12. O-O-O

a5 13. a4 Bb4 14. Qe2 Nb6 15. axb5 a4 16. Bh3 Rf6 17. bxc6 axb3 18. Qb5 Ba3 19.

Qxb3 Nc4 20. Na4 Bxb2+ 21. Nxb2 Ra1# 0-1


This Week In Chess


On August 1st, the Colorado Springs Chess Club started the August Swiss 90 (5SS, G/90+30).


Standings. August Swiss 90


# Name Rtng Rd 1 Tot Prize

1 Paul D Anderson 2001 W7 1.0

2 Aleksand Bozhenov 1994 W8 1.0

3 Peter Barlay 1912 W9 1.0

4 Mark McGough 1876 W10 1.0

5 Brian Jo Rountree 1856 W11 1.0

6 Michael Smith II 1573 W12 1.0

7 Derek Eskeldson 1270 L1 0.0

8 Scott Ch Williams 1233 L2 0.0

9 Clinton D Eads 1229 L3 0.0

10 Daniel J Rupp 989 L4 0.0

11 Brian Henry Baum 643 L5 0.0

12 Douglas N Clark 159 L6 0.0


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